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Entertainment

    Actor Sylvester Stallone is the victim of a death hoax. A rumor claiming that the 71-year-old actor had passed away recently surfaced on social media — and he was not happy about it. >> Read more trending news  Stallone took to Twitter to express his annoyance. “Please ignore the stupidity,” the “Rocky” star tweeted Monday. “Alive and well and happy and healthy … Still punching!” >> See the tweet here Stallone’s younger brother, Frank, also took to the social media platform to inform everyone of the death hoax. And he wasn’t happy either. “Rumors that my brother is dead are false,” he wrote. “What kind of sick demented cruel mind thinks of things like this to post? People like this are mentally deranged and don’t deserve a place in society.” >> See the tweet here Read more here.
  • An actress who accused Oscar-winning actor Geoffrey Rush of inappropriately touching her on a Sydney stage later swore at him when he followed her into a toilet at a party after a performance, Australian court documents allege. Rush is suing Sydney's The Daily Telegraph newspaper in Federal Court for defamation over articles last year that he argued portray him as a pervert and sexual predator. The articles allege inappropriate behavior and touching during the Sydney Theatre Company production of 'King Lear' in 2015. Accusations in defense documents previously suppressed by the court were made public on Tuesday. Eryn Jean Norvill played Cordelia alongside the 66-year-old Australian actor, who played the title role and her father. The documents allege Rush touched Norvill in a way that made her feel uncomfortable on five separate occasions during the final week of the production, in a scene where he carried her as she simulated a lifeless body. Rush's lawyer, Richard McHugh, told the court on Monday the accusations were vague. But the newspaper will attempt to prove that Rush engaged in scandalously inappropriate behavior, and that his conduct was so serious that the theatre company would not work with him again. The defense documents allege Norvill was visibly upset and told Rush to stop after the first instance of on-stage touching, which was not scripted, directed or necessary for the performance. Rush is also accused of following the actress into the women's toilet at a restaurant during the cast's celebration after the final performance. Rush is accused of standing outside her toilet stall until she swore at him and told him to leave. The newspaper denies Rush's claims that its articles made him out to be a pervert and a sexual predator, and its lawyers previously told the court they made no allegations of a sexual nature. Justice Michael Wigney on Monday delayed to a later date Rush's request to have the newspaper's truth defense struck out. Rush has performed in the Sydney Theatre Company for 35 years. He won the 1997 best actor Academy Award for 'Shine' and has three other Oscar nominations. He is perhaps best known as Captain Barbossa in the 'Pirates of the Caribbean' films.
  • Actor Michael Keaton is slated to give the commencement address at Ohio's Kent State University. Keaton enrolled at Kent State in 1971, intending to major in journalism and speech. He left school to pursue acting, landing appearances on 'Mister Rogers' Neighborhood,' ''Maude' and 'The Mary Tyler Moore Show.' His range of hit movies includes 'Batman,' ''Birdman' and 'Spotlight.' Keaton spoke at Kent State in 1985 and said then that he would like to return someday. Kent State President Beverly Warren says having Keaton speak at the May 12th ceremony is a 'rare opportunity' for graduates to hear from 'someone who has walked in their shoes and now has risen to the top of his field.' The school will pay Keaton $100,000, the same it paid actress Octavia Spencer last year.
  • Saturday Night Live' alum Colin Quinn is exercising his wit days after a heart attack interrupted his busy touring schedule. The 58-year-old Quinn took to Twitter on Monday to let friends and foes alike know he's 'starting a list of those who didn't 'check in' yet,' five days after his Valentine's Day health emergency. The deep-thinking comic thanks the doctors and nurses at his New York hospital, saying they 'realized they had a precious jewel of comedy in their hands.' Quinn announced his heart attack last week, saying on Twitter his heart broke on Valentine's Day, 'literally.' He said he was doing well but if he dropped dead 'you would see a funeral like Al Capone!' He says the attack made him reflect, realizing 'we aren't guaranteed tomorrow.
  • Highlights from media coverage of the Pyeongchang Olympics: WARDROBE MALFUNCTION: Gabriella Papadakis took no chances. Her ice dancing costume on Tuesday contained no hooks, nothing that could come undone as it did a day earlier in the Olympics' most famous wardrobe malfunction. The French athlete and partner Guillaume Cizeron completed a lovely, lyrical free skate to win a silver medal behind the Canadian team of Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, but it was hard not to see in their faces the belief that the faulty costume had cost them gold. NBC analyst Tanith White said she was 'sitting here grabbing my chest feeling my heart pound' after their performance. White, however, punted when the time came to give her opinion on the deserving winner. 'It's making me sweat, just the idea of having to choose between the Canadian and the French, but most important, they were both exceptional,' she said. True, it was tough. But that's her job. WARDROBE MALFUNCTION, PART TWO: After two wardrobe malfunctions on the ice, it was hard to watch Canadian Kaitlyn Weaver's ice dancing routine without focusing on a loose red strap that kept falling down her arm. Apparently it was part of the costume. TUMBLE: NBC analyst Luke Van Valin built up the tension as defending American gold medalist Maddie Bowman skied through her final run in the freestyle halfpipe, noting as she was in the air that Bowman had reached the point where she wiped out in her first two runs. Then it happened again. Van Valin and Todd Harris wisely stayed quiet as the camera bore witness to Bowman sobbing in the snow, recognizing the moment as a metaphor for the U.S. team's rough showing in Pyeongchang. It was a welcome example of Van Valin stepping out of a world in which he's too comfortable. He tends to get lost in numbers describing various moves, and 'amplitude' is clearly his favorite word. We were stunned, however, to hear him talking about an earlier conversation with a judge about what they needed to see in a routine by American Brita Sigourney. Extraordinary reporting. But are Olympic judges supposed to be that forthcoming about a competition that hasn't been completed yet? I'M SO EXCITED: A tie for bobsled gold! OMG OMG OMG! We thought NBC's Leigh Diffey would blow a gasket when a Canadian team hit the same 3 minutes, 16.86 second winning time as a pair of Germans. Darned if he can't pull history out of thin air. 'It's a tie!' Diffey said. 'The last time Canada won a gold medal it was a tie as well. History repeats!' Not off your couch and cheering yet? 'The Olympic sliding center has seen some amazing things these games but nothing like this!' TWEET OF THE NIGHT : 'So great that @leighdiffey and @JohnMorgan7 can make almost every bobsled run sound like a walk-off home run in Game 7 of the World Series.' — @zagfreak. RUSSIAN TROUBLE: NBC doesn't have a great track record of talking about uncomfortable Olympic stories that are making news elsewhere, like the sexual misconduct accusations against Shaun White or Shani Davis' unhappiness at not being a flagbearer. So it should be noted that the network addressed, in prime time and elsewhere, the doping charge against a Russian curler. RATINGS: It was a comparatively slow Sunday for Olympic content, with an average of 18.2 million watching on NBC, NBCSN or through streaming services in prime time. That's down 15 percent from Sochi four years ago; the NBC-only telecast was down 23 percent. Saturday was the least-watched night of the Olympics so far, with 16.1 million viewers on NBC, NBCSN and streaming services, although that was down only 6 percent from Sochi. Viewership has largely exceeded expectations for the first half of the Olympics, but interest tends to dwindle in the second week. LAST LAUGH: NBC baffled some viewers Sunday by showing extended coverage of meaningless training runs by downhill skiers. The Nielsen company gave a window into NBC's thinking: The night's viewership peaked at 20.7 million when America's skiing sweethearts, Lindsey Vonn and Mikaela Shiffrin, were on the mountain. So no one should have been surprised to see yet another Vonn practice run on Monday's telecast. ___ Corrects to Todd Harris from Trace Worthing. ____ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • Michael Fabiano was singing at the Metropolitan Opera when a key mix-up occurred. The tenor began Rodolfo's famous first act aria in Puccini's 'La Boheme' on Friday night when it became clear the orchestra was playing in a different key under conductor Marco Armiliato. 'I said, oh, no, they can't be doing this,' Fabiano recalled on Monday. The Met is presenting Franco Zeffirelli's 1981 production 15 times this season with four different lead tenors. When Russell Thomas sang the role in October and November, he opted for a version of 'Che gelida manina! (How cold your little hand is!)' that was one half tone down and finished with a top B natural, as opposed to the original key which ends in a top C, the Met music staff said. Puccini wrote both versions, and Fabiano prefers the higher key. 'The brilliance of the whole aria is lost in the transposition,' Fabiano said. 'When you sing in the lower key, the whole aria becomes fatter.' But the orchestra's sheet music never got changed for the resumption of the run last week. Fabiano glanced at the podium when that became apparent. 'We took a look at each other, like, what can we do now?' Armiliato said. The tenor kept on going, but the mix-up was noticeable enough to prompt comments on the Opera-L chat room. 'Once you're on the new train track, there's no way to stop, have a timeout on the football field and confer,' Fabiano said. The Met said the parts will be restored to the original key for the remaining performances. Fabiano took solace at one aspect of the mix-up. 'It's better to be down than up, I'll tell you that,' he said.
  • The Rev. Jesse Jackson said on Monday he's deeply insulted by a Fox News host's 'attack' on Cleveland Cavaliers star LeBron James and thanked the basketball All-Star for standing up for what he believes in. Political commentator Laura Ingraham criticized the three-time NBA champion for his recent comments about social issues, suggesting he should 'shut up and dribble.' James has vowed he won't do that, saying he'll continue to 'talk about what's really important.' Jackson said it's important for James, Golden State Warriors teammates Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry and other NBA players to keep speaking out against injustice and the behavior of President Donald Trump. 'No one told David to just play his harp and not stand up for his people,' Jackson said by telephone from Chicago on Monday. 'No one told Samson just lift weights and not challenge the Philistines. They told Jackie Robinson, 'Just play baseball.' He told them, 'I'm a man with dignity first.' They told Dr. King, 'Go be confined to the pulpit.' He said, 'I must speak peace to a troubled world.' In that tradition, King James, LeBron, his slam dunk for justice is needed. We thank him.' Jackson, who founded the two nonprofit organizations that merged to become Rainbow/PUSH, said it's star athletes' duty to speak up when confronted with inequity or wrongdoing. 'When Trump is attacking the FBI and covering up for the KGB,' Jackson said, 'LeBron's voice is needed.' The Republican president has repeatedly slammed the FBI, tweeting that its reputation was in 'tatters' and suggesting it failed to stop a Florida school shooting massacre because it was fixated on investigating allegations Russia meddled in the 2016 election. Jackson disclosed last year he has Parkinson's disease. He said on Monday he's doing 'very well.
  • It’s been “a beautiful day in this neighborhood” for 50 years. Feb. 19, 1968, was the day that PBS aired the first episode of “Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood,” and the lessons that Fred Rogers taught still resonate today. A re-imagined tales of “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood,” several televised tributes and even a feature-length movie remind us of the legacy of Mr. Rogers.  According to his official biography from the foundation that carries on his mission of education, Rogers was born in 1928 in the small town of Latrobe, Penn., east of Pittsburgh. After getting a degree in music composition, he was hired by NBC in New York as an assistant producer and eventually a floor director for some of the network’s programming in the ’50s. History was made in 1953 when WQED in Pittsburgh asked Rogers to come up with their first schedule. He produced a show called “The Children’s Corner,” where he  introduced characters such as Daniel Striped Tiger, X the Owl and Henrietta Pussycat. Those characters have found new life on “Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood,” where children now learn those positive messages not in puppet form, but from cartoons.  Fred Rogers’ belief in kindness led him to seminary, where he was ordained as a Presbyterian minister. Instead of moving toward a traditional religious calling, his charge was “to continue his work with children and families through the mass media.” In 1963, he was offered the opportunity to start a show in Canada called “Misterogers.” Three years later, he went back to Pittsburgh and created a new show called “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood,” which went national 50 years ago, on what would become PBS. Fred Rogers died on Feb. 27, 2003, in Pittsburgh and was survived by his wife, Joanne, and their two sons and three grandsons. >> Read more trending news  Rogers’ message of love and kindness still resonates today. When there is a national tragedy, memes or video clips of Fred Rogers telling children and adults alike to “look for the helpers” gives those who need it a moment of reassurance that everything will be OK. “Mr. Rogers’ Neighborhood” also helped launch the careers of some current stars.  Actress Ming-Na Wen, known for her role as Agent Melinda May on “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” and as the voice of Disney’s Mulan, appeared on the show. Bill Nye the Science Guy appeared on an episode in 1997 to help everyone’s neighbor perform an experiment, Entertainment Weekly reported. Rogers also introduced kids to various genres of music, thanks to guest stars who dropped by, including Wynton Marsalis, Yo-Yo Ma and Tony Bennett, Entertainment Weekly reported. Michael Keaton, who went by his original name at the time, Michael Douglas, had one of his first jobs working as a stagehand on the show. He helped operate the iconic trolley, CBS News reported. He was also one of the “Flying Zookeeni Brothers,” Parade reported. Keaton will host a one-night-only PBS special that pays tribute to Rogers on March 6. “Mister Rogers, It’s You I Like” will feature Keaton and cast regulars, including Joe Negri, who portrayed Handyman Negri, and David Newell, who portrayed Mr. McFeely. Rogers will also be remembered by guests Judd Apatow, Whoopi Goldberg and Sarah Silverman, according to PBS. But that’s not the only remembrance planned for Mr. Rogers. Starting on Feb. 26, PBS Kids will run a weeklong tribute to Rogers, PBS announced.  A forever stamp will also honor Rogers this year and is scheduled to be released on March 23, WPXI reported. And a biopic has been announced in which Tom Hanks has been slated to star as Rogers.
  • Bold. Visionary. A spectacular success. The words in an online promotion for a new museum exhibit in Washington, D.C., describe an 1830 U.S. law that forced thousands of American Indians from their lands in the South to areas west of the Mississippi River. Provocative, yes, says the co-curator of the exhibit 'Americans' that opened last month at the National Museum of the American Indian. Bold and visionary in imagining a country free of American Indians. A spectacular success in greatly expanding wealth from cotton fields where millions of blacks worked as slaves. 'When you're in the show, you understand bold and visionary become tongue in cheek,' co-curator Cecile Ganteaume said. The exhibit that runs through 2022 has opened to good reviews and pushes the national debate over American Indian imagery — including men in headdresses with bows, arrows and tomahawks — and sports teams named the Chiefs, Braves and Blackhawks. The NFL's Washington Redskins logo on one wall prompts visitors to think about why it's described both as a unifying force in D.C. and offensive. The exhibit falls short, some say, with an accompanying website and its characterization of the Indian Removal Act. The online text is a perplexing way to characterize an effort that spanned multiple presidencies and at one point, consumed one-fifth of the federal budget, said Ben Barnes, second chief of the Shawnee Tribe. The law led to the deaths of thousands of people who were marched from their homes without full compensation for the value of the land they left behind. And it affected far more tribes than the five highlighted online, he said. 'It made it seem like it was a trivial matter that turned out best for everyone,' he said. 'I cannot imagine an exhibit at the newly established African-American museum that talked about how economically wonderful slavery was for the South.' Ganteaume said the website isn't encyclopedic and neither it nor the exhibit is meant to dismiss the experiences of American Indians. Instead, it challenges the depths at which people recognize indigenous people are ingrained in America's identity and learn how it happened, she said. An opening gallery has hundreds of images of American Indians — often a stoic chief in a Plains-style headdress or a maiden — on alcohol bottles, a sugar bag, motor oil, a missile mounted on the wall and a 1948 Indian Chief motorcycle. Dozens of clips expand on how the imagery has permeated American culture in television and film. But when historic or cartoonish images are the only perception people have of what it means to be Native, they can't imagine American Indians in the modern world, said Julie Reed, a history professor at the University of Tennessee. 'Even when I'm standing in front of students, identified as a Cherokee professor, making the point from Day 1 that I'm still here and other Cherokee people are still here, I still get midterm exams that talk about the complete annihilation of Indian peoples,' she said. Ganteaume said that while Native people have deep histories in other countries, the United States is more often fixated on using images of them. Side galleries expand on what's familiar to most Americans: the Trail of Tears, Pocahontas and the Battle of Little Bighorn. An orientation film on the invention of Thanksgiving starts with a once widely used television screen test featuring an Indian head and then questions the hoopla of the national holiday when America already had Independence Day. Eden Slone, a graduate student in museum studies in the Washington, D.C., area, said she was impressed by the exhibit's design and interactive touch tables. She never realized that Tootsie Pop wrappers featured an image of an American Indian in a headdress, holding a bow and arrow. 'I think the exhibition was carried out well and it definitely makes you think of Native American imagery,' she said. 'When I see images like that, I'll think more about where it came from.' Reed, University of Tennessee professor and Cherokee woman, fears people will get the wrong impression about the Indian Removal Act from the website. An essay puts a positive spin on what Reed calls ethnic cleansing. Yet, she plans to visit. 'I think there is legitimacy to say, come look at this exhibit. That's a fair response to criticism,' Reed said. 'I want to go and give the exhibit a fair shake because it may be brilliant and could do everything the website does not.
  • London Fashion Week saw a flurry of shows Monday emphasizing romance and femininity, often with exquisite workmanship and dashes of mystery and drama. Dresses dominated the runway. Christopher Kane offered a strong collection of very feminine, sometimes very revealing dresses at his catwalk show at the Tate Britain museum. Canada-born designer Erdem Moralioglu turned the National Portrait Gallery into a showcase for his contemporary designs, which featured long, elaborately made dresses, many with floral themes offset by black backgrounds. ___ CHRISTOPHER KANE CHANNELS 'THE JOY OF SEX' Kane went 'old school' for his London Fashion Week show with a collection that overtly referenced two 70s' classics: 'The Joy of Sex' and 'More Joy of Sex' books. 'I have never shied away from sex in the collections and this one is no different,' said Kane. 'Since the beginning, I have found it fundamental to our idea of women. Women with their own power who create their own worlds.' Anyone who missed the point was reminded by the none-too-subtle voiceover on the soundtrack encouraging people to experience more joy, more play and more sex. Many of Kane's dresses were semi-sheer and lacy, in simple but effective blacks and reds, along with some relatively demure knitwear, including an impressive deep purple dress. Kane made very effective use of black set off with silver, as well as primarily black outfits that seemed to shimmer with color. Pants were sometimes ripped or had fabric cut out and some blouses and dresses sported horizontal 'peekaboo' slits. Kane used a wide variety of materials, including cotton canvas coats, raw wools and crushed velvet. ___ FALSE ALARM AT TATE SENDS MODELS INTO DRIZZLY RAIN There was an unexpected evacuation of the Tate Britain Museum several hours before the Christopher Kane show, sending visitors — and models — into a light rain outside while a fire alarm was checked. The models were rained on for about 20 minutes before the alarm was lifted, creating some challenges for makeup artists and stylists preparing for Kane's showcase event. ___ ERDEM BUILDS ON A DELICATE, VEILED THEME Erdem's London Fashion Week show made heavy use of veils — and black veil material — not only to shade the faces of many models but also as the fabric for leggings, long gloves and some shawls and capes. The veil material was detailed with black polka dots that became a design motif throughout the show, giving the models an unearthly and sometimes off-putting look when their faces were totally obscured. A few outfits had retro flair, including some silver metallic skirts that evoked the flapper era, and some fused Asian designs that gave the show an international feel. Colors were rich and vibrant and the floral designs were complex and evocative. The show, with American Vogue editor Anna Wintour in her customary front-row seat, showed a remarkably uniform approach to design, each piece reinforcing and building on the look. ___ GLAMOUROUS NIGHT AT BUCKINGHAM PALACE Prince William's wife, Kate, the Duchess of Cambridge, co-hosted a fashion reception at Buckingham Palace with Sophie, the Countess of Wessex and wife of Prince Edward, William's uncle. The two were acting on behalf of Queen Elizabeth II at the glittery event. Among the guests Monday night were model Naomi Campbell, designer Stella McCartney and Edward Enninful, the new editor of British Vogue. The event was a celebration of the Commonwealth Fashion Exchange, launched earlier this month to foster partnerships between established and emerging talents in the Commonwealth countries ahead of the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in London in April. ___ BLAST FROM THE PAST: PAULINA PORIZKOVA RETURNS Almost overlooked in the flood of attention paid to Christopher Bailey's farewell show at Burberry was the return of Czech-born Paulina Porizkova, one of the original supermodels. She made a rare catwalk appearance Saturday to support designer Jiri Kalfar.