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    Top-ranked Villanova led by as many as 44 points — 44! — and gave Georgetown coach Patrick Ewing a rude welcome back to the schools' rivalry, handing the Hoyas their worst loss in more than 40 years, 88-56 on Wednesday night.Jalen Brunson led the way with 18 points and seven assists for Villanova (17-1, 5-1 Big East), which finished 17 for 33 on 3s, while Georgetown went 4 for 15.Mikal Bridges scored 17 for the Wildcats, winners of seven consecutive games against the Hoyas, Villanova's longest streak in a series that dates to 1922.The last time Ewing faced Villanova in any capacity was in the last game of his college playing career at Georgetown, a surprising 66-64 victory for the underdog Wildcats in the 1985 NCAA championship game. It was quite clear, quite quickly, on Wednesday that there would be no such tight outcome —nor any chance of an upset by Georgetown (12-6, 2-5).This is Ewing's first season as a head coach at any level, and he opted to go with an easy-as-can-be non-conference schedule to try to build his players' confidence. Now that league play is underway, especially against a foe like Villanova, the gap between the Hoyas and the best teams is obvious.It was 42-20 at halftime, and Georgetown to that point had more turnovers (nine) than made baskets, shooting 8 for 26, including 0 for 8 on 3s.Villanova just kept pushing the margin after the break, going up by 30, then 40, and then reaching the apex at 88-44 on a layup by Dhamir Cosby-Roundtree with about 3½ minutes remaining. Less than a minute later, Villanova coach Jay Wright finally sent on the subs and pulled any remaining starters.INJURED AND ILLVillanova: Reserves Tim Delaney and Jermaine Samuels sat out with a virus.Georgetown: Backup PG Trey Dickerson left in the first half with a back spasm and did not return.BIG PICTUREVillanova: Since its only loss, 101-93 at Butler on Dec. 30, Villanova has won four games in a row, propelled by an efficient offense that gets a lot of its work done from beyond the arc.Georgetown: This was the Hoyas' largest margin of defeat since a 33-point loss to Maryland, 104-71, on Dec. 10, 1974.UP NEXTVillanova: Travels to UConn on Saturday in a matchup between former Big East rivals and the Wildcats' first game at Hartford in five years. Villanova is 12-0 in non-conference games heading into the last one on their schedule.Georgetown: Hosts St. John's on Saturday, the teams' second meeting in less than two weeks. The Hoyas won 69-66 at Madison Square Garden on Jan. 9___Follow Howard Fendrich on Twitter at http://twitter.com/HowardFendrich___More AP college basketball: http://collegebasketball.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • Seismic activity beneath a Papua New Guinea volcano could mean that a major eruption was imminent, a volcanologist said on Thursday.Thousands of people have been evacuated from islands surrounding Kadovar Island off the South Pacific nation's north coast since a volcano there began erupting on Jan. 5, spouting ash. Flights nearby have been canceled due to the risk posed by ash plumes and ships were warned to stay away from the island.Steve Saunders, principal geodetic surveyor at the Rabaul Volcano Observatory in Papua New Guinea, said seismic activity had recently increased beneath the volcano.'The reason we're getting activity is probably because new magma is moving up from deeper down,' Saunders told Australian Broadcasting Corp.Prime Minister Peter O'Neill has said relevant state resources were being made available to support evacuations and he warned northern coastal communities to be alert for possible tsunamis. Kadovar is offshore to the north of New Guinea, the larger island that includes Papua New Guinea's capital, Port Moresby.Papua New Guinea sits on the 'Ring of Fire,' a line of seismic faults encircling the Pacific that has frequent earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.
  • What makes a private sexual encounter newsworthy? A little-known website raised that very question after publishing an unidentified woman's vivid account of comedian Aziz Ansari's sexual advances while the two were on a date. The story on Babe.net threw a wrench into the #MeToo movement, with some feminist writers dismissing the incident as a bad date that should have remained private. Others welcomed the piece for spurring a debate over deeper cultural attitudes that normalize aggressive behavior toward women. Media ethics experts say it's not easy to determine what constitutes a legitimate story of sexual misconduct in the midst of a social movement that has emboldened people to speak out on subjects once considered taboo. 'What takes this out of the realm of a really bad date and into the realm of something that is publicly significant?' asked Ed Wasserman, dean of the journalism school at the University of California, Berkeley. 'It's a little borderline.'   The story, which appeared Saturday, offers a detailed 3,000-word account of a night out between Ansari and a 23-year-old Brooklyn photographer that ended at the comedian's home. The woman told the site that the actor repeatedly initiated sexual activity despite what she later called 'clear non-verbal cues' indicating her discomfort and lack of interest. She also reportedly told Ansari that she didn't want to 'feel forced' in the encounter. The woman told Babe.net that she eventually decided the incident was a sexual assault and said she was angered when she saw Ansari wearing a 'Time's Up' pin at the Golden Globe Awards. The pin referred to a movement against sexual misconduct in Hollywood. The website published screenshots of what it said were text messages between the two the next day. The woman told Ansari the encounter had made her uncomfortable; he texted back with an apology. The story was initially published with no comment from Ansari because, the website said, his representatives did not get back to them by its deadline. Many major news organizations reacted cautiously. The Associated Press and other media outlets did not report on the story until Ansari issued a public statement addressing the claim the next day. The actor, who stars on the Netflix hit 'Master of None,' acknowledged that he apologized to a woman last year when she told him about her discomfort during a sexual encounter in his apartment that he believed to be consensual. Feminist writers, other actors and media commentators were left to debate the public value of an anonymous tale about a confusing encounter at a time when more women are speaking publicly about sexual assault. Some prominent women, including Whoopi Goldberg and Ashleigh Banfield, a host on the CNN spinoff HLN, concluded that the story didn't describe sexual misconduct of any kind and lacked newsworthiness. The feminist writer Jill Filipovic, in a column for The Guardian , said the piece touched on the need for more stories about 'how pervasive power imbalances benefit men and make sex worse for women.' But she said Babe.net squandered that opportunity by failing to 'tell this particularly story with the care it called for' and muddying the line between sexual assault and misogynistic behavior.   The story's reporter and editors at Babe.net, which is less than two years old and says it has 3 million readers, have publicly defended their news judgment. 'We stand by our story,' said site editor Amanda Ross. Babe.net is published by Tab Media, a company that has received funding from Rupert Murdoch. Helen Benedict, a Columbia journalism professor, said the story's one-sided, anonymous account was difficult to judge. But that, she said, encapsulates the tension between the public's need to know and the obligation of the media to protect sources, particularly people who say they are victims of sexual assault and request anonymity. Benedict said the story didn't sufficiently press the woman on her motivations and took a flippant approach as to whether the incident constituted sexual assault. 'I don't feel that the reporters asked enough about what the goal was,' she said. 'What does she want?' Ryan Thomas, an assistant professor at the Missouri School of Journalism, said the piece lacked the rigor of other stories that used multiple sources to establish a clear pattern of abuse by prominent men like Harvey Weinstein and Louis C.K. 'Most of the journalism has been very methodical in identifying a catalog of incidents to build a picture of a pattern of behavior,' Thomas said. By contrast, he said, the Babe.net story 'focuses on a single case against a named individual by an anonymous individual,' thus raising questions about its newsworthiness and the care with which it was reported. Few have called into question the veracity of the report, particularly because Ansari himself did not dispute it. Wasserman, the Berkeley professor, said he finds it difficult to criticize the piece for crossing any lines of journalistic integrity. After wrestling with the question of whether the article addressed an issue of legitimate public concern, he said, he 'reluctantly' sided with Babe.net. 'Is this news? It really does come out of an area of activity that is normally considered to be pretty private,' he said. 'But on balance, the entire question of sexual misconduct arises from interactions that we should consider private.
  • With her 1,000th victory in the books, Barbara Stevens gave a predictable answer when asked what's next.'The next one. Southern Connecticut (Saturday). That's where our focus is and that's where our preparation will be tomorrow,' Stevens said after Division II Bentley beat Adelphi 78-66 Wednesday night for her 1,000th win.Stevens (1,000-275) joined North Carolina's Sylvia Hatchell and Connecticut's Geno Auriemma as coaches reaching the milestone this season — both Hatchell and Auriemma getting there on the same night earlier in the year. Tara VanDerveer got there last February.Pat Summitt is the other women's coach to get there, while two coaches on the men's side — Mike Krzyzewski and Herb Magee — have also won 1,000.'When people mention those peoples' names, those coaches' names, along with my name, it doesn't register with me, honestly,' Stevens, 63, said. 'I don't know, maybe when I have a minute, somewhere down the road, to reflect, maybe I'll think about it and I'll say, 'That was kinda cool.''Right now, we're kind of a one game at a time — we have the (Bill) Belichick thing going on here. But honestly . I so enjoy coaching them. It's kind of just on to the next one.'With 17.5 seconds left in the game, the packed student section began a 'Bar-bara Ste-vens chant.'When the final buzzer sounded, one of the Bentley players dumped a Gatorade bucket — filled with paper — on the coach, and Stevens received a hug from Adelphi coach Missy Travesi.Monica Viapiano, one of five Falcons in double figures in the win, was in charge of the bucket, saying she knew it had to contain paper because the men's game followed the special event. The once-crowded gym was mostly empty for the men's game, also against Adelphi.Stevens said she wasn't worried about liquid in the bucket 'because they know better.'Stevens was presented with a bouquet of flowers and posed with her team for pictures at center court. All fans in attendance received a 'Stevens 1000' t-shirt. Later, she posed for a huge group picture, which included her mother, Betty.In typical Stevens fashion, she said, 'I have tried to avoid this whole situation like the plague — if I heard anybody talking about it I just walked the other way. I knew that this milestone was approaching and you can't avoid it, but at the same time I didn't want anything to distract me. I wanted to prepare my team to the best of its ability.'I didn't want the spotlight or the focus to be on anything else but them.'The Falcons (17-1) had to defeat a nemesis to get Stevens to her milestone on the first try, as Adelphi (9-10) coming in with four straight wins over Bentley.Stevens called timeout with her team down 22-13 and the Falcons responded by outscoring the Panthers 27-9, closing the first half on a 14-0 run to establish control.Up by nine at the half, the Falcons saw a 12-point lead shaved to five but then finished the third quarter on a 9-1 run to lead by 13 after three.The lead was 14 before Adelphi ran off seven straight points to cut its deficit in half with 3:39 remaining. The Panthers would get no closer as the Falcons went on a 10-0 run to put the game away.Stevens also coached at Clark and Massachusetts, totaling eight years between the two before taking over at Bentley for the 1986-87 season. Her first team went 24-5 and the winning has not stopped.The only coach to be named WBCA Division II National Coach of the Year five times, notched her first win Dec. 1, 1977. No. 100 came in the MAIAW Championships in 1982; No. 200 was recorded Feb. 6, 1988; No. 300 came March 1, 1991; 400 was Jan. 21, 1995; 500 came Nov. 20, 1998; 600 was Jan. 26, 2003; 700 came Jan. 5, 2006, 800 was earned Dec. 9, 2010; and 900 Jan. 25, 2014.She has had 12 30-win seasons, Bentley won the Division II national title in 2014 (with a 35-0 record) and was inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in 2006.
  • Not being in the limelight has never bothered Kyle Van Noy.He didn't start a NFL game until his third season when he was with the Detroit Lions, and even then was thought of as a role player.So now being considered one of the leaders on a Patriots defense that is on the cusp of making a return trip to the Super Bowl seems somewhat out of place for the fourth-year linebacker as he heads into Sunday's AFC championship game against Jacksonville.'I've been in so many situations since I've been here,' Van Noy said of the increased role he's had in New England.'I mean going deep in the playoffs last year and then playing all of the games this year. ... Each and every game there's different situations, different scenarios that come up. So I would say that my awareness has gone up a lot since I've been here.'The same could be said about his value.When linebacker Dont'a Hightower went down with a season-ending torn pectoral muscle in the Patriots' win over the Falcons in Week 7, it left a void in the side of a defense that entered 2017 young and inexperienced up front.New England had already given up 30 or more points three times to that point and was ranked 23rd in the NFL in scoring defense, allowing 23.7 points per game.Van Noy began the season starting at outside linebacker alongside Elandon Roberts in the middle and Hightower at the other outside spot.But when Hightower went down, the coaching staff asked Van Noy to handle multiple roles, playing both on the edge and middle of the field at times.Safety and defensive captain Devin McCourty said that the 26-year-old showed glimpses of that versatility even last season.It's why it wasn't strange for him to see Van Noy tackle the responsibility of receiving the defensive play call from the sideline, another role that he's inherited with Hightower out.He flourished in them all, and over the final nine weeks of the season New England got stingier on defense.By the end of the season it was allowing just 18.5 points per game — the fifth-best mark in the league.Van Noy missed three of the final four games with a calf injury, but still finished the regular season third on the team with 73 tackles and second with 5½ sacks. Van Noy's sack total was just a half-sack short of Hightower's career-high of six in 2014.'It helps our defense out a lot, and he's one of a lot of guys on our defense that have been able to play different positions that allow us to do different things defensively,' McCourty said. 'He's been a leader, he's run the huddle kind of since he's been in there.'Coach Bill Belichick said continuity and execution has improved all over the defense, with lots of contributions from Van Noy and others such as Trey Flowers, Marquis Flowers, Adam Butler, Deatrich Wise Jr. and Ricky Jean Francois.'Some of the guys that are playing now weren't playing. If we had had this conversation in the middle of the season, you wouldn't be asking about them,' Belichick said.'They've stepped into different roles and they've worked together more, gotten a better feel for each other, execution's better, so it's good.'Van Noy said any success he's had is simply a product of his environment.'There are a lot of superstar defensive players that aren't even talked about,' he said. 'When I was with the Detroit Lions there was a guy named DeAndre Levy who never made a Pro Bowl, but who everybody knew, if you played football, who he was. There are situations like that all the time. And there's teams that have really good defenses that aren't talked about. We're one of them.'NOTES: The Patriots placed defensive back and special teamer Jonathan Jones on injured reserve. They also announced the signing of receiver Bernard Reedy. Reedy was a member of the Patriots' practice squad.___For more NFL coverage: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFL___Follow Kyle Hightower at http://www.twitter.com/khightower
  • Archaeologists and divers on Mexico's Yucatan peninsula announced Wednesday that they found a passage connecting two underwater caves, creating what they say is the world's longest continuous flooded cave.Divers from the Great Maya Aquifer Project said the discovery has revealed a combined cave about 216 miles (347 kilometers) long.Mammoth Cave in Kentucky remains the world's longest cave of any kind, with more than 400 miles (650 kilometers) of passages explored.The Sac Actun and Dos Ojos caves were both previously known and are near the Caribbean coast town of Tulum. The combined cave will be known as the Sac Actun system, taking on the name of the longer section.Divers have long known that Yucatan's underground caves and rivers are frequently connected, but finding this connection was a task that involved years of searching through labyrinthian passageways.Many caves in the Yucatan were at one time above sea level and were dry or partly dry. Evidence of early human inhabitants and extinct fauna have been found inside some cave systems. Relics of Mayan culture, whose descendants still populate the peninsula, have also been found in the caves.'This immense cave represents the most important submerged archaeological site in the world, as it has more than a hundred archaeological contexts,' Guillermo de Anda, a subaquatic archaeologist, said of the find. 'Along this system, we had documented evidence of the first settlers of America, as well as extinct fauna and, of course, the Mayan culture.
  • Three men accused of plotting to bomb an apartment complex housing Somali refugees in Kansas have no legal basis to request that prospective jurors come from rural counties where more residents voted for President Donald Trump, a federal judge ruled Wednesday.The men are accused of targeting apartments and a mosque in Garden City, a meatpacking area in rural western Kansas. But they are being tried about 220 miles (354 kilometers) away at the closest federal courthouse in Wichita, where trials pull prospective jurors from surrounding, more urban counties.The men argue the practice is discriminatory because it excludes western Kansas counties where more rural, conservative residents live.U.S. District Judge Eric Melgren ruled that the demographic differences between the regions aren't legally recognizable and wouldn't violate the men's right to a jury trial before a cross-section of the community. Melgren also said the defendants lacked standing to act on behalf of citizens in those counties to challenge the court's practice.Prosecutors had opposed the men's request, arguing that defense attorneys were trying to pick a jury pool based on ideology and open 'a dangerous door' to similar requests in other cases.The defendants — Gavin Wright, Patrick Stein and Curtis Allen — are accused of plotting to detonate truck bombs in Garden City a day after the November 2016 election. They are charged with conspiracy to use a weapon of mass destruction and conspiracy against civil rights. Wright also is accused of lying to the FBI.The men, who prosecutors allege were part of a militia group, have pleaded not guilty.Defense attorneys noted that prospective jurors who live in southwestern Kansas were twice as likely to have voted for Trump than prospective jurors in the Wichita area. That's important because jurors will have to decide whether the men's alleged conduct constituted a crime, or whether it was protected under the constitutional rights to free speech and assembly, and to bear arms.Melgren said there was no evidence to support the 'bare assertion' that citizens in southwest Kansas possess an ideology that fundamentally differs from citizens to their east in the Wichita area.The judge also noted that adding prospective jurors from sparsely populated western Kansas counties would boost the number of registered Republicans in the jury pool by only 2.37 percent, which he said was 'entirely insufficient to show political discrimination.
  • A former photographer at the Department of Energy says he lost his job in retaliation for making public photos of a meeting between Secretary Rick Perry and a coal baron peddling a wish list of policy initiatives that would directly benefit his company.Simon Edelman has filed a federal whistleblower complaint alleging he was terminated from the agency after he provided the photos to two media outlets that published them in December. Edelman was at the March 29, 2017, meeting snapping shots as Robert 'Bob' Murray handed Perry a four-page 'action plan' to revive the nation's struggling coal industry. Murray is chairman and CEO of Ohio-based Murray Energy, one of the nation's largest coal producers.Also attending the meeting were Perry's chief of staff and Andrew Wheeler, a coal company lobbyist later nominated by President Donald Trump to serve as the second-highest ranking official at the Environmental Protection Agency.Copies of the plan were obtained earlier this month by The Associated Press and other media outlets. A review of the plan shows many of the proposals provided by the major GOP political donor were later advanced by the Trump administration.Edelman and his lawyer, John Tye, are seeking a formal Justice Department investigation into what they allege was corrupt conduct by a public official. Edelman also filed a complaint with Energy's inspector general and a Senate oversight committee.In an interview with The Associated Press on Wednesday, Edelman said he listened in as Murray detailed the actions he wanted the Trump administration to take. They included replacing members of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, pulling the United States out of the Paris climate accords and revoking the Clean Power Plan, former President Barack Obama's signature effort to limit planet-warming emissions from coal-fired power plants.Edelman said he heard Perry respond, 'I think we can help you on this.'Energy Department spokeswoman Shaylyn Hynes denied anything improper occurred during the meeting.'The assertions that this individual has made about Secretary Perry and the Department of Energy are ridiculous,' Hynes said Wednesday. 'Industry and other stakeholders visit the Department of Energy on a daily basis. The secretary welcomes their input and feedback to strengthen the American energy sector.'Hynes did not address Edelman's claims of retaliation.Gary Broadbent, a spokesman for Murray, said the coal company CEO does not have a recollection of the exact statements he might have made in the meeting, which occurred nearly a year ago.'Mr. Murray has frequently said that the Trump administration must advance reliable and low-cost electricity for all Americans and protect coal mining jobs,' Broadbent said. 'We applaud the actions taken by President Trump's administration, to date, to protect these jobs and to advance the energy security of the United States.'Records show Murray Energy contributed $300,000 to Trump's inaugural committee and has financially backed the campaigns of Perry, a former Texas governor and presidential candidate.The AP reported last year that Murray had asked the Trump administration to issue an emergency order protecting coal-fired power plants from closing. Murray warned that failure to act could cause thousands of coal miners to be laid off and force his largest customer, Ohio-based FirstEnergy Solutions, into bankruptcy.Perry ultimately rejected Murray's specific request, but later asked FERC to boost coal and nuclear plants by subsidizing their continued operation. The Republican-controlled commission voted unanimously earlier this month to reject Perry's claim that further retirements of coal-fired power plants pose a threat to reliability of the nation's electric grid.Edelman said he was placed on administrative leave and subsequently dismissed from the agency in December after the photos of the meeting were published by In These Times, a left-leaning news site. He said he was escorted by the building by security and said some of his personal property was seized, including a laptop computer, photo equipment and three external hard drives. Edelman is demanding the return of his property as part of his complaint.The photographer said he was motivated to make the photos public after seeing a published interview where he believes Murray misrepresented what occurred in the March meeting. Edelman said the free market should determine which sources of energy are profitable, not government regulations favoring a specific industry or company.The photos were not classified and he believes he had a First Amendment right to release them.'They're angry at me, but I didn't do anything wrong,' Edelman said. 'The Department of Energy are the ones breaking the law. And they kept all my stuff.'___Follow AP environmental writer Michael Biesecker at http://twitter.com/mbieseck
  • A purported psychic who charged an elderly Massachusetts woman $3.5 million for exorcisms and 'spiritual cleansing' has been sentenced for evading taxes.Federal prosecutors say 41-year-old Sally Ann Johnson, of south Florida, was sentenced Wednesday to two years and two months in prison. She was ordered to repay the woman and pay $725,000 to the IRS.Prosecutors say Johnson ran businesses that claimed to offer psychic readings and spiritual cleansing and strengthening.Between 2007 and 2014, prosecutors say a Martha's Vineyard woman paid Johnson about $3.5 million for services that claimed to rid the woman of demons.Prosecutors say Johnson didn't report the income and tried to hide the money to avoid paying taxes.Johnson pleaded guilty in October to attempting to interfere with the administration of IRS laws.
  • Michael Wolff's 'Fire and Fury' sold more than 190,000 hardcover copies last week, the book's first full week of publication, a company which tracks the retail market told The Associated Press on Wednesday.In less than two weeks since its release, combined e-book, audio and hardcover sales now top 500,000 for Wolff's sensational account of a dysfunctional Trump administration.NPD BookScan, which compiles about 85 percent of hardcover and paperback sales, told the AP that about 220,000 hardcover copies have sold in all. That number is expected to go much higher. The book caught on with so many people that publisher Henry Holt and Co. has struggled to keep copies available. Amazon.com, where 'Fire and Fury' has been No. 1 throughout its publication, is advising customers that shipments may take 2-4 weeks. NPD BookScan does not register a sale until the book has actually been sent.Meanwhile, 'Fire and Fury' also has been a hit in other formats. Last week, CEO John Sargent of Holt parent company Macmillan told the AP that 'Fire and Fury' had sold more 250,000 copies as an e-book and more than 100,000 in audio. More than 1 million hardcover copies are in print.'Fire and Fury' is among the fastest selling nonfiction books in recent years, likely helped by President Donald Trump's denunciations and threats to sue. It also was last week's dominant seller. According to BookScan, no other release even reached 30,000 copies.