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    The Atlanta Hawks are tied for the worst record in the NBA. Predictably, the team’s local TV ratings have dropped dramatically. The decline is the largest by any NBA team in its home market this season. > More:  How many Atlantans are watching Hawks games? All 82 Hawks games this season are being televised on Fox Sports Southeast. The Hawks’ next game is Friday at Indiana.  > Also:  Seating changes coming to SunTrust Park
  • A Slovenian hockey player who became the third athlete to be caught doping at the Pyeongchang Olympics said Tuesday he tested positive for an asthma drug that he took under doctor's orders and he had forgotten to seek approval for its use. The Court of Arbitration for Sport said Ziga Jeglic tested positive for fenoterol in an in-competition test. Fenoterol is a drug designed to open the airways to the lungs. 'I take the mentioned drug due to asthma under medical advice,' Jeglic said in a statement, adding he was tested on Friday. 'It has been prescribed to me after testing for respiratory problems in Slovakia in 2017. Unfortunately I have forgot to declare it as (a therapeutic use) exception.' Jeglic was suspended from the games and has been ordered to leave the athletes village within 24 hours. 'I have overlooked the difference between comparable drugs, which are allowed and would enable me to use it for my respiratory problems during the Olympics,' he said. 'I apologize for my negligence to all the persons involved and I accept the further anti-doping procedures.' Slovenia lost to Norway 2-1 in overtime in men's hockey on Tuesday and was eliminated from the Olympic tournament. Jeglic was scratched from the team ahead of the announcement about his positive test. The 29-year-old forward played in all three preliminary-round games and had an assist. He also scored the winner in a shootout as Slovenia beat Slovakia 3-2 on Saturday, a day after he gave his sample to testers. 'He's a big part of our team. We were kind of disappointed and a little upset that he won't be able to play, but we don't really know what the situation is,' Slovenia captain Jan Mursak said after the loss to Norway. 'Ziga's a great guy, big part of that team, great team guy, so I'm sure whatever the problem is, it's going to get fixed and Ziga's going to be fine.' This is the second consecutive international tournament from which Jeglic has been suspended. He was banned for two games at the world championships last year for swinging his skate at Switzerland winger Thomas Rufenacht. 'He's one of the better players, better offensive players,' Mursak said. 'Every guy counts on our team, and to lose a guy like that in such an important game means a lot to our team.' In the Kontinental Hockey League, Jeglic plays for Neftekhimik Nizhnekamsk. He has two goals and four assists in 26 games this season. Japanese short-track speedskater Kei Saito failed a pre-competition test in Pyeongchang and Russian curler Alexander Krushelnitsky, who won a bronze medal, tested positive during the games. Late Tuesday, the delegation of the 'Olympic Athletes from Russia' said Krushelnitsky's 'B'' sample had also tested positive for the banned substance meldonium but the results suggested he had only consumed it once — not enough to indicate intent to enhance his performance. ___ AP Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno in Gangneung contributed to this report. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • Relaxed, fast and excited. It was a good day for Mikaela Shiffrin on the Olympic downhill course Tuesday. Shiffrin will no longer start in the downhill medal race on Wednesday, choosing to focus on the following day's Alpine combined event that was moved up in the wind-buffeted schedule. That decision, taken late Monday, cleared her mind enough to post a fast run in the third and final practice. Any regrets about skipping the Olympic downhill? 'Not so much. To be honest, a little bit of relief,' Shiffrin said after clocking the fifth-fastest time in Tuesday's practice. 'That run today was much more what I was looking for as far as being relaxed goes.' Shiffrin said her practices on the previous two days were tense and conservative, and she was 'struggling to find my timing a little bit, struggling to find an aerodynamic position.' Then came a forecast of strong winds for Friday, forcing organizers to condense the program with more back-to-back race days. The same winds already eliminated all off-days between Shiffrin's races last week. She was only fourth as an overwhelming favorite in slalom after taking gold in giant slalom. 'Having the Alpine combined move forward was actually a relief to me,' the 22-year-old American said. 'Today I put something together (in training) that I'm really excited about. I was able to push it a little more.' Still, she said she would have raced the downhill if there was still a day off before the combined as scheduled. 'But I didn't want to be taking spots (in downhill) from our girls who are all potentially a threat for top five (and) medal positions,' Shiffrin said. Instead, Shiffrin planned to spend the afternoon training for the slalom run in combined, and 'have more of a rest day' on Wednesday. Shiffrin is a strong contender in combined, which typically rewards slalom specialists over speed racers. The best men's slalom skier, Marcel Hirscher, won the men's Olympic combined title at the Pyeongchang Games. Unlike Shiffrin, most top downhill racers don't have time for serious slalom training — not on the World Cup circuit and certainly not at the Olympics where their top medal target is on Wednesday. The Swiss team said there would be no slalom training Tuesday for Lara Gut. One year ago at the world championships, Gut severely injured her right knee crashing in slalom warm-ups after the downhill run in combined. Lindsey Vonn said she had no intention skiing any slalom gates that would risk her chance in downhill on Wednesday. 'Hell, no,' she said Tuesday, explaining how skiing slalom could 'make my knees sore' and burn unnecessary energy. 'I feel like I'm playing Russian roulette,' Vonn said of the combined event. 'If everything lands perfectly I could potentially get a medal. It's not worth it for me to be training slalom because I'm not good enough at it to really make an improvement in training.' Advantage Shiffrin. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org/
  • They cheered. They cried. They hugged. They watched as fans by the thousands shouted, 'We are one.' Unification flags for the two Koreas, longtime rivals and sometimes bitter enemies, flapped across the Olympic arena. And now they go back home, quite possibly never to see each other again. The Korean women's hockey team, which included players from both North and South, ended its historic Olympic run on Tuesday with a fifth straight loss but a host of unforgettable feel-good sparks. Team Korea was defeated by Sweden 6-1 in a seventh-place match in the Pyeongchang Games on Tuesday, a healthy crowd again on hand to cheer them on. The team lost by a combined score of 28-2 in its games and was rarely competitive. Yet the repeated defeats were, for many, insignificant. Instead, this notion dominated discussion: the significance of the Koreas' first-ever joint Olympic squad taking the ice smack in the middle of an abrupt, now ongoing reconciliation between the rival Koreas. 'They are an amazing group,' said the team's Canadian coach, Sarah Murray, who wept while hugging some of her squad. 'I could have never imagined our players being this competitive in the Olympics,' Murray said after the game. 'So when I was standing there I was just so proud of them, just watching them skate around and salute the fans.' South Korean forward Kim Heewon wiped away tears as she and teammates waved to cheering fans during a standing ovation. Some spectators wept as Korean players — North and South — stood in a circle at the center of the rink and hit the ice with their sticks in a post-game ceremony before leaving the rink. 'It's been a special opportunity to get to know those girls, and we'll miss having them around,' said player Randi Heesoo Griffin of Cary, North Carolina, whose mother is South Korean. The two governments bar their citizens from visiting each other's country and exchanging phone calls, letters and emails. Griffin said she understood that when it came to staying in touch, 'there's some barriers to that, obviously.' 'I mean, none of them have Facebook, so might be hard,' Griffin said. 'But there were definitely bonds that were formed. And I think if we end up playing against each other again, South Korea vs. North Korea, there's definitely going to be some hugs and some smiles.' The team was formed just days before the Pyeongchang Games began during an eleventh-hour push by the two Koreas to improve ties after a year of spiking nuclear tensions that triggered fears of a war on the Korean Peninsula. The team's makeup was a key part of agreements the Koreas struck to cooperate in the Olympics, which eventually provided a breather from a nuclear standoff involving the North, the South and the United States. Despite initial worries about their teamwork, North and South Korean players were seen getting along with each other. There were many small moments of warm relations that seemed to improve as the games went on. During Tuesday's classification round game against Sweden, the Korean team played with newfound pace and more confidence against a team they were earlier routed by 8-0 in a preliminary-round match. On Sunday, they lost 2-0 to Switzerland, which beat them 8-0 in their landmark debut match. The Korean team lost 4-1 to Japan its final preliminary-round match. The Koreas' improving performances were likely because players gradually got over nervousness and pressures from the spotlight. Every minor interaction between North and South Korean players was in the news because it was so extraordinary. They took selfies, visited a beach and created a dictionary to overcome the North-South dialect divide. 'We have really enjoyed working with the North's players and coaches and we really do want to help them in the future,' Murray said. She said a possible 'exchange game' has been discussed to maintain the connection. 'They want to get better, they want to keep learning from us and we want to help them,' she said. 'And there are things that we can learn from them, too.' The team's formation raised hopes that Olympics-related warming gestures could transcend beyond sports and contribute to easing nuclear tensions. But it is unclear if the good mood will last after the Olympics end, particularly since Seoul and Washington are set to kick off delayed springtime military drills that Pyongyang views as a rehearsal for invasion. Joo Moon-sook, a 43-year-old who attended the game Tuesday with her husband and 12-year-old daughter, said the joint team's Olympic appearance has helped soften South Koreans' hawkish views on North Korean people after years of animosity. 'It's an educational experience for children, letting them see for themselves that North Koreans aren't scary and bad people, but part of who we are as a nation,' Joo said. 'I can't forget the first game — the moment they stepped onto the ice. I was choking with tears.' For now, the team will remain in South Korea until the closing ceremony — not practicing, but continuing video meetings until the weekend and, presumably, going over good memories. For South Korean goalie Shin So Jung, the opportunity to experience such a moment from the inside — and appreciate it while it was happening — was unforgettable. 'Our win-loss record isn't good, but I hope we brought them joy and heartfelt moments,' Shin said. 'I don't think I will experience anything like this again. So many people came here to see us and cheer for us. I hope their love for us lasts.' ___ Hyung-jin Kim and Kim Tong-hyung are Seoul-based correspondents for The Associated Press. Follow them on Twitter at @hyungjin1972 and @KimTongHyung.
  • Ryan Zapolski was more worried about losing the sensation in his hands and feet than carrying the pressure of the United States' Olympic medal hopes on his shoulders. In a frightening play, Ladislav Nagy crashed into Zapolski's head and the goaltender was down on the ice for several minutes Tuesday. Zapolski recovered and ended up delivering perhaps his best game so far as the Americans beat Slovakia 5-1 in an elimination game to reach the quarterfinals, where they will face the Czech Republic on Wednesday. The U.S. had scored only four goals in its previous three games at the Olympics, but Ryan Donato scored twice and fellow collegiate player Troy Terry had three assists. With the offense finally clicking, the U.S. needed Zapolski to be on his game and he was, stopping 21 shots and playing after jamming his neck. 'My hands and feet went numb a little bit, so it just kind of pinched my nerve, I guess,' Zapolski said. 'I think I just needed time for the feeling to come back. It took a little bit. It was a little bit of a scary thing for me kind of losing feeling in your body for a little bit, but it went away pretty quickly.' The U.S. got two scares simultaneously when Zapolski and Donato went down following hits to the head. Zapolski insisted he never felt concussion symptoms from the collision with Nagy, while Donato said he felt fine after taking a shoulder to the jaw from 6-foot-4 Slovakia defenseman Michal Cajovsky, who was ejected. Donato has four of the Americans' five goals, and Zapolski has started every game. Losing them both would have been devastating, but instead they shook it off and were two of the best players on the ice. 'We all had to show up,' Zapolski said. 'We know we have to win now to keep moving on. I think that's something that shows how strong this team is and how resilient we are. We had I think our best game today.' Donato scored two goals to tie his father, Ted, with four in a single Olympics. Between periods, Donato saw video of his dad — who had four goals for the U.S. at the 1992 Albertville Games and coaches him at Harvard — in the stands and said, 'I've never seen him smile like that before.' Donato also scored twice against Slovakia in a 2-1 win in group play. Terry showed he can thrive on the big stage and overall it was a breakout performance by a team that needed one. The offensive outburst included a 5-on-3 power-play goal by James Wisniewski and goals at even strength by Mark Arcobello and Garrett Roe. Donato added his goals and shook off the hit from Cajovsky that left him with a bloody nose. Fearing it was broken, Donato didn't miss a shift and set the screen on Wisniewski's goal. 'He's a really tough kid, and you see how much just of a natural goal-scorer he is,' Terry said. 'He's fun to play with and if I get the puck to him I know it's got a pretty good chance of going in.' Slovakia scored a second-period power-play goal by Peter Ceresnak through traffic that Zapolski had little chance of stopping. Zapolski didn't have any flashbacks to blowing a two-goal lead in an overtime loss to Slovenia, and there was enough offense to make sure that didn't happen. Scoring five goals against the team coach Tony Granato called perhaps the best defensive team in the tournament has the Americans feeling good going into the quarterfinals. 'I think people saw tonight we have a very fast team and a team that can play good hockey,' Terry said. 'So we have a lot of belief in our team and we're excited to keep going.' Despite a 4-0 loss to the Russians to wrap up group play, Granato and his players believe they've gotten better each game and see a benefit in playing the extra qualification-round game to keep improving. The Czech Republic is up next for the U.S. 'There's some different weapons that we'll have to be aware of,' Granato said. 'I think what we learned from our team is it doesn't matter what the other team does. We have to attack, we have to get in on the forecheck, we have to use our offensive players that we do have, the skillset that we do have.' Elsewhere in the qualification round: — Norway beat Slovenia 2-1 in overtime for its first Olympic win since 1994. Norway will face the Russians in its first Olympic quarterfinal appearance, while Slovenia played without Ziga Jeglic, who was suspended for doping. — Finland played South Korea, with the winner advancing to take on Canada. — Germany played Switzerland, with the winner advancing to play top-seeded Sweden. NOTES: Slovakia goaltender Jan Laco allowed five goals on 33 shots. ... St. Cloud State defenseman Will Borgen was a healthy scratch again for the United States. ... Veteran forward Jim Slater returned to the lineup, replacing Chad Kolarik. ... Former NHL player and coach Craig Ramsay coaches Slovakia. ___ Follow Hockey Writer Stephen Whyno on Twitter at https://twitter.com/SWhyno ___ More AP Olympics: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir were the last couple to leave the ice after their warmup early Tuesday, the Canadian ice dancers soaking in every second before their final Olympic performance. They sure made it a memorable one. After training partners Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron broke the world record with a flawless free skate, Virtue and Moir took the ice one last time with a dazzling, dramatic interpretation of 'Moulin Rouge.' Every movement was synchronized, every element raw and emotional, the only question left inside Gangneung Ice Arena was whether it would be enough. The score: a personal-best 122.40 points, and a record 206.07 total, pushing them past their French rivals' score of 205.28 and making them the most decorated figure skaters in Olympic history. 'We didn't know we had won, that's for sure,' Moir said with a laugh. 'We really committed to our training because we knew we'd have to be better than we've ever been.' They were better than anybody has ever been. It was the second gold medal of the Pyeongchang Games for Virtue and Moir, who were instrumental in helping Canada win the team event . It was also their third gold overall after winning their home Olympics in Vancouver in 2010, and their fifth total medal after two silvers at the 2014 Sochi Games. They briefly retired after that disappointment, seemingly content with their place in history, only to decide a couple years ago to make one more run at Olympic glory. Now, they're being called the greatest ice dancers ever. 'I mean, it's incredibly flattering,' Virtue said, 'but it's hard to wrap our heads around so close to the event. We're grateful for the legends that came before us and really paved the way.' Virtue and Moir's medal total broke a tie with Russia's Evgeni Plushenko and Sweden's Gillis Grafstrom for the most in Olympic figure skating, and their golden haul matched the record shared by Grafstrom, Sonja Henie of Norway and Irina Rodnina of the Soviet Union. 'They're a once-in-a-generation talent,' said Patrice Lauzon, who along with his wife, Marie-France Dubreuil, coaches the Canadians and French at their school in Montreal. American siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani won the bronze medal with a near-flawless free skate to 'Paradise' by Coldplay. Their total of 192.59 points made up the two-hundredths of a point they trailed teammates Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue, leaving them fourth. 'It was amazing to finally have that Olympic moment,' Alex Shibutani said. 'We didn't really think about results. If we did the best we could, we were going to be satisfied.' The third American team, Madison Chock and Evan Bates, also was within sight of the podium after the short dance. But a rare and stunning fall entering their combination spin was enough to damage an otherwise beautiful performance to 'Imagine' that still drew an emotional applause. Meanwhile, the race for the gold medal came down to two teams a cut above the rest. Virtue and Moir have been the standard bearers for the better part of a decade, the longest-tenured ice dance team in Canadian history. They carried the Maple Leaf flag into the opening ceremony, and their rock-inspired Latin short dance Monday broke their own world record. Papadakis and Cizeron were the new rivals on the scene, bringing a fresh, contemporary style that had won the judges over. They upset the Canadians at the Grand Prix Final in December, then set the world record with their elegant, mesmerizing performance at last month's European championships. The French couple, whose wardrobe malfunction in the short dance made them a trending topic worldwide, drew the penultimate starting number for Tuesday's free dance. They put on a program that former ice dancer Meryl Davis described as 'art in motion' — their lifts were effortless, choreographed elements smooth and synchronized twizzles as if they were tied together. Their score of 123.35 points was exactly what they needed to make a case for gold. 'We did the best we could, an amazing performance,' Papadakis said, 'so then there's nothing else you can do. You sit back and enjoy.' The unflappable Virtue and Moir answered the challenge with 4 minutes to last a lifetime, a short dance certain to go down in Olympic history. The throaty, gritty portion of 'El Tango de Roxanne' had the crowd roaring, and their finishing lift was a fitting conclusion to an exemplary performance. Not to mention their exemplary careers. 'They were born under good stars,' Dubreuil said with a smile, 'because they found each other at a young age, and it's a partnership that kept growing. I mean, 20 years of skating together. Eyes closed, they know what they're doing. It's something spectacular.' ___ AP Sports Writer Barry Wilner contributed to this report. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • Eric Hosmer and the San Diego Padres finalized their $144 million, eight-year contract Monday night. The team announced the signing after Hosmer passed his physical. The first baseman, who spent his first seven major league seasons with Kansas City before becoming a free agent this winter, can opt out of the deal after five years. The contract is the largest in Padres history. Hosmer gets a $5 million signing bonus payable within 30 days of the contract being approved by the commissioner's office. His salary is $20 million each year from 2018-22 and would be $13 million annually from 2023-25 if he doesn't terminate the deal. A four-time Gold Glove winner and 2016 All-Star, Hosmer will be introduced during a news conference Tuesday morning at Padres camp in Peoria, Arizona. In a statement, Padres Executive Chairman Ron Fowler and General Partner Peter Seidler called the move 'a significant moment in Padres history.' 'The intangibles and experience that he brings to the table will be vital as we continue the development of our young club and strive to bring a championship to deserving Padres fans everywhere,' they said. San Diego general manager A.J. Preller said Hosmer 'has been a winner throughout his career' and his resume 'speaks for itself.' 'We believe his leadership and passion for the game will be invaluable,' Preller said. Selected third overall by the Royals in the 2008 amateur draft, Hosmer helped Kansas City win the 2014 AL pennant and 2015 World Series. He is a .284 career hitter with a .342 on-base percentage and 127 home runs. He's also played in 31 career postseason games, batting .276 with three homers and 29 RBIs. The 28-year-old Hosmer hit a career-high .318 for the Royals in 2017, playing in all 162 games, and matched his best from the previous season with 25 home runs. He drove in 94 runs and scored 98. He also had a career-best .385 on-base percentage. Hosmer, who will wear No. 30 with the Padres, was the MVP of the 2016 All-Star Game at Petco Park in San Diego. He also helped Team USA win the World Baseball Classic last year, batting .385 (10 for 26) during the tournament. San Diego went 71-91 last season and finished fourth in the NL West, above only San Francisco. The rebuilding Padres, with one of the top-rated farm systems in baseball, haven't been to the playoffs since 2006. ___ More AP baseball: https://apnews.com/tag/MLBbaseball
  • Two of the Big 12's most powerful offenses collided when No. 8 Kansas hosted Oklahoma. Only one lived up to the hype, though. Devonte Graham had 23 points and seven assists, Malik Newman added 20 points and No. 8 Kansas beat Oklahoma 104-74 on Monday night in its first true blowout of the Big 12 season. 'It was a fun night, a good win,' coach Bill Self said. 'Certainly we needed a game where we could not sweat until the very, very end.' The Jayhawks (22-6, 11-4 Big 12) controlled things early, jumping out to a 10-0 lead less than four minutes into the game and forcing Oklahoma coach Lon Kruger to burn a timeout before the first media break. The Sooners (16-11, 6-9 Big 12) never recovered. 'From the start, seemed like we were fighting uphill all night,' Kruger said. 'Just hanging on to stay within range. Guys fought it pretty good for a while, obviously didn't finish it like we want to or need to.' Kameron McGusty led the way for Oklahoma with 22 points while Jamuni McNeace added 18 in his first career start. It was a cold shooting night for Trae Young, who missed 10 of his 13 shots and had a career-low 11 points. He led the game with nine assists. Six Jayhawks scored in double figures, and the team broke the 100-point threshold for the first time since December. It was an offensive performance unlike any other during their Big 12 season, fueled partially by the memory of their loss to the Sooners in Norman back in January. 'The only the thing that was on our mind was just getting payback,' Newman said. 'We went down there, and they stole one from us.' The win marks No. 300 all-time in Big 12 play for the Jayhawks. Only two other schools (Texas, Oklahoma) have surpassed the 200 mark. NEW LOOK SOONERS Kruger made a drastic change to his team's starting lineup, replacing three starters before tonight's game. Only Young and Christian James remained from last game's starting five. 'We lost a few in a row,' Kruger said. 'We're just searching. We're just trying to get some sort of spark.' DAWN OF DE SOUSA Silvio De Sousa had the first notable performance of his Kansas career, scoring 10 points and grabbing six rebounds in just 13 minutes. He's struggled mightily in his sparse playing time, as early graduation allowed him to enroll at the semester break while he should be a high school senior. 'Tonight he was poised, he took his time on the post,' Self said. 'You compare that performance and at OU, where he had three turnovers in one minute and everything, and it's night and day.' INTO THE RAFTERS Former Kansas point guard Sherron Collins had his jersey retired at halftime, making him the 33rd player in program history to receive the honor and the second in the last three days, after teammate Cole Aldrich had his number raised Saturday. Collins ranks No. 5 all-time in scoring at Kansas with 1,888 points, and No. 9 in assists with 552. In 2010, he was named a consensus first team All-American, and was the Big 12 sixth man of the year on the team that won the 2007-08 national championship. BIG PICTURE Kansas now sits a half-game ahead of Texas Tech atop the Big 12 standings after gaining a game on the Red Raiders when they fell to Baylor Saturday. Oklahoma has now dropped its last six games, and has fallen to No. 8 in the Big 12. The skid has led some to speculate that the Sooners could miss the NCAA Tournament. UP NEXT Kansas has a road clash with Texas Tech Saturday, serving as a battle for the outright Big 12 lead. Oklahoma will look to rebound at home against a hot Kansas State team on Saturday.
  • The Latest on the Pyeongchang Olympics (all times local): 10:25 p.m. Johannes Rydzek has won the Nordic combined large hill gold medal at the Pyeongchang Olympics, leading a German sweep of the podium. Fifth after the ski jumping, Rydzek took the lead on the last lap of the 10-kilometer cross-country race and beat compatriot Fabien Riessle by four seconds Tuesday. Normal hill champion Eric Frenzel won the bronze. Akito Watabe of Japan was first after the ski jumping stage and started with a one-second lead over Norway's Jarl Magnus Riiber but finished fifth behind Riiber. Defending champion Joergen Graabak of Norway couldn't recover from a poor result on the ski jump and finished 10th. Nordic combined features ski jumping and a cross-country ski race. The athlete who wins the ski jumping stage starts first followed by the remaining athletes in their order of finish. ___ 9:30 p.m. Biathlete Martin Fourcade has become the first athlete to win three gold medals at the Pyeongchang Games, helping France to a first-place finish in the mixed relay. Fourcade erased nearly a 38-second deficit on the final leg of the relay by hitting all 10 shots to help the French team of Marie Dorin Habert, Anais Bescond and Simon Desthieux to a come-from-behind victory. Fourcade waved the French flag as he crossed the finish line for his team in 1 hour, 8 minutes and 34.3 seconds. Norway took home the silver medal and Italy the bronze. It was the fifth Olympic gold medal in the biathlon for Fourcade. Only Norway's Ole Einar Bjoerndalen has more Olympic golds than Fourcade in the biathlon; he has eight. ___ 8:55 p.m. South Korea has won the penalty-filled women's 3,000-meter short-track relay final at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Italy took silver and the Netherlands earned bronze after being elevated to the podium after winning the B final in world-record time. China and Canada were penalized, moving Italy from bronze to silver. Canada and Italy's skaters waited anxiously for the referees to sort out the chaos at the end of the race. The Italians celebrated their surprise medal. In the closing laps, a Korean skater fell and brought down a Canadian skater. Italy also fell late in the 27-lap race. Korea came into the final ranked first in the world with China ranked second. The Dutch won the B final in 4 minutes, 3.471 seconds, lowering the mark of 4:04.222 set by Korea in November 2016 at Salt Lake City, Utah. ___ 8:45 p.m. The Russian delegation to the Pyeongchang Olympics says a second test of a sample from a curler who won bronze is positive for the banned substance meldonium. The delegation says in a statement that 'we express our sincere regret over the fact of the incident.' But the statement says results indicate Alexander Krushelnitsky only consumed meldonium once. The delegation says that would be 'absolutely useless and ineffective' if the intent was to enhance performance. It has not provided any data from the test. The Russian Olympic Committee has set up its own investigation, which could treat the issue as a criminal matter. Russian curling officials have previously suggested that Krushelnitsky could have been set up by a rival Russian athlete or Russia's political enemies. He and his wife, Anastasia Bryzgalova, were third in mixed-doubles curling. Meldonium is designed for people with heart problems and some believe it can help athletes increase stamina. It was banned in sports in 2016. The second test was on the same sample as the first. The sample is split into two bottles and tested separately to make sure lab equipment error doesn't result in a false positive. ___ 8:30 p.m. Skaters from South Korea, China, Canada and Hungary are among those advancing out of the heats of the men's 500-meter short track at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Wu Dajing of China won his heat in an Olympic-record 40.264 seconds. Lim Hyo-jun, the 1,500 champion, moves on to Thursday's quarterfinals. Canadian Samuel Girard, the 1,000-meter winner, and 1,000-meter bronze medalist Seo Yira of South Korea safely advanced out of their heats. A couple of big names — 2010 Olympic champion Charles Hamelin of Canada and Sjinkie Knegt of Hungary — failed to advance after being penalized for impeding. Knegt won silver in the 1,500. Americans John-Henry Krueger, Aaron Tran and Thomas Hong were eliminated. Krueger earned silver in the 1,000, which so far is the only speedskating medal won by the U.S. The only North Korean skater in the event, Jong Kwang Bom, fell in the first turn. Referees called for a re-start and Jong fell again coming out of the first turn while fighting for second place. He was later penalized. ___ 7:50 p.m. Choi Min-jeong of South Korea, Arianna Fontana of Italy, Li Jinyu of China and Kim Boutin of Canada are among the top short-track speedskaters safely into the quarterfinals of the women's 1,000 meters. Others advancing to Thursday's quarterfinals include Shim Suk-hee of South Korea, Yara van Kerkhof of the Netherlands, Marianne St-Gelais of Canada and Kim Alang of South Korea. Elise Christie of Britain returned to competition after injuring her right ankle in a dramatic crash last weekend. But she went down going into the first turn and slid across the ice while grabbing at her ankle. The referees allowed a re-start and Christie came off the line in last place. She nearly fell in a turn, but briefly rallied only to receive a yellow card after committing two penalties. She was carried to the locker room. Americans Jessica Kooreman and Lana Gehring were eliminated. __ 7:15 p.m. Norway has its first win in men's hockey at the Olympics since 1994 on home ice in Lillehammer. The traditional Winter Games powerhouse is an underdog in hockey but beat Slovenia 2-1 in overtime on a goal by Alexander Bonsaksen on Tuesday at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Before the game, Slovenian hockey player Ziga Jeglic became the third athlete to be caught doping at the Pyeongchang Games. The Court of Arbitration for Sport said Jeglic tested positive for fenoterol in an in-competition test. Fenoterol is a drug designed to open the airways to the lungs. Jeglic said it was an asthma drug that he took under doctor's orders. Jeglic was scratched from the team ahead of the announcement about his positive test. ___ 6:05 p.m. The Germans have made a change to their mixed relay biathlon team just hours before race time in the Pyeongchang Olympics. Arnd Peiffer has replaced Simon Schempp as the anchor on the relay team Tuesday night. Peiffer won gold in the 10-kilometer sprint earlier in the Olympics. Schempp nearly took gold in the 15-kilometer mass start on Sunday but lost in a photo finish to Martin Fourcade, the world's No. 1 biathlete from France. The Germans gave no explanation for the change. Germany enters the competition seeded third and looking for their 12th gold medal overall, which would pull them even with Norway for the most golds in the Pyeongchang Games. ___ 5:50 p.m. Lindsey Vonn won't have to wear the unwanted No. 1 bib again when she starts the downhill at the Pyeongchang Olympics. On Saturday in the super-G, her only choice was being the first starter. It didn't work out and she finished sixth. It's a cat-and-mouse game top skiers play in picking start numbers for speed races. Vonn will start No. 7 on Wednesday, right after big rival Sofia Goggia. The top-ranked Italian had first pick of odd-numbered bibs from Nos. 1 to 19 and took 5. Vonn had next pick. The American says she based her pick off what Goggia selected. She says, 'I'm picking right behind her so I would like to start behind her. I like knowing my competitors, what times they get, how they're skiing.' ___ 5:20 p.m. A Norwegian curler who lost out on the Olympic bronze medal to a Russian charged with doping says he feels horrible knowing they may have been cheated out of a medal. Magnus Nedregotten said Tuesday from Norway that if Alexander Krushelnitsky is found guilty, then he robbed the Norwegian team of their 'moment of glory.' Krushelnitsky and his partner, Anastasia Bryzgalova, won the curling mixed doubles bronze medal last week after beating Nedregotten and his partner Kristin Skaslien 8-4. If Krushelnitsky is convicted of doping, he could be stripped of his medal. The Norwegians would then get the bronze. Nedregotten says he's thought about his fourth-place finish every day. He says, 'Now knowing that we may have been robbed and having to sit at home and wait to see what happens is obviously emotional and very stressful.' ___ 4:40 p.m. The Russian Hockey Federation says defenseman Slava Voynov has every right to play at the Pyeongchang Olympics despite his domestic violence conviction. The federation says Voynov and his wife 'are living together in a happy marriage' despite Voynov's conviction on a misdemeanor charge of corporal injury to a spouse and his suspension from the National Hockey League. The federation says Voynov is eligible to participate in international competitions. Voynov has two assists in three games for the Russian team, which will play either Switzerland or Germany in Wednesday's quarterfinals. Voynov was convicted of assaulting his wife after a Halloween party in 2014. The International Olympic Committee set strict criteria to bar Russians linked to a state-backed doping program, but it didn't rule out those with criminal convictions for other matters. ___ 4:25 p.m. A Slovenian hockey player has become the third athlete to test positive for doping at the Pyeongchang Olympics. The Court of Arbitration for Sport says Ziga Jeglic tested positive for fenoterol in an in-competition test. Fenoterol is a drug designed to open the airways to the lungs. Jeglic has been suspended from the games and has been ordered to leave the athletes village within 24 hours. Slovenia was scheduled to play Norway in men's hockey on Tuesday, but Jeglic was scratched from the team. The 29-year-old forward played in all three preliminary-round games and had an assist. Japanese short-track speedskater Kei Saito and Russian curler Alexander Krushelnitsky, who won a bronze medal, have also tested positive at the Pyeongchang Games. ___ This item has been corrected to show Jeglic is a forward, not a defenseman. ___ 3:05 p.m. The women's big air final at the Pyeongchang Olympics has been rescheduled to Thursday because of expected strong winds on Friday. The snowboarding competition sends racers down a 160-foot-long (50-meter) ramp to vault off a huge kicker and travel up to 100 feet (30 meters) below for the landing. It made its debut at the Olympics on Monday. The slopestyle competition at the Pyeongchang Games was raced last week in strong winds, and almost every rider agreed it should not have been held then. Snowboarders in that event completed only nine of the 50 runs without a fall. Wind has been a persistent problem in Pyeongchang and forced three of the first four Alpine ski events to be postponed. Last week, winds howled through the Olympic Park, and the area was evacuated. ___ 2:45 p.m. A hearing has not yet been scheduled in the case of a Russian curler accused of doping at the Pyeongchang Olympics. Secretary-General Matthieu Reeb of the Court of Arbitration for Sport says a hearing for Alexander Krushelnitsky won't occur Tuesday, but there is no fixed date for it yet. Krushelnitsky won the bronze medal in mixed doubles. Russian officials have said he tested positive for the banned substance meldonium. If he is found guilty, he could be banned and forced to return his Olympic bronze medal. The International Olympic Committee could decide against formally reinstating Russia for the Pyeongchang closing ceremony, meaning its athletes would not be allowed to march under the Russian flag. The Russian Curling Federation president has said it's possible someone spiked Krushelnitsky's food or drink. ___ 2:30 p.m. The United States' men's hockey team has beaten Slovakia 5-1 in the qualification round at the Pyeongchang Olympics to advance to face the Czech Republic in the Olympic quarterfinals. American Ryan Donato scored his third and fourth goals of the tournament, and Troy Terry had three assists Tuesday. College kids again led the way for the U.S., which scored more against Slovakia than it did in all three preliminary-round games. James Wisniewski, Mark Arcobello and Garrett Roe also scored for the Americans, who took advantage of a 5-on-3 power play for hits on Donato and goaltender Ryan Zapolski. Zapolski shook off a collision with Ladislav Nagy and had arguably his best game of the tournament. ___ 1:40 p.m. Upon further review, the two-man bobsled race at the Pyeongchang Olympics was even closer than first thought. It ended up with a tie for gold between Germany and Canada. It was also the closest finish by the top four sleds in any Olympic sliding race ever. Canada's Justin Kripps and Alexander Kopacz shared the two-man gold with the German duo of Francesco Friedrich and Thorsten Margis. Each finished in 3 minutes, 16.86 seconds. Latvia got bronze, with Oskars Melbardis and Janis Strenga finishing 0.05 seconds back. Nico Walther and Christian Poser of Germany finished 0.20 seconds back of the lead and somehow didn't medal, getting only fourth. No individual athlete or team has even been that close to the winner in an Olympic sliding race and not medaled. ___ 1:20 p.m. Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir have won the gold medal in ice dance at the Pyeongchang Olympics, becoming the most decorated figure skaters in Olympic history with their third gold and fifth medal overall. The Canadian pair scored a record 206.07 points, highlighted by their dramatic free dance set to the music of Moulin Rouge, to beat training partners Gabriella Papadakis and Guillaume Cizeron. The French pair broke their own world record for a free dance with 123.35 points to 'Moonlight Sonata,' forcing Virtue and Moir to beat their own best by 3.28 points. The Canadians' score of 122.40 points gave them room to spare. American siblings Maia and Alex Shibutani took the bronze medal with a strong free skate. ___ 1 p.m. Mikaela Shiffrin is feeling relaxed by her decision not to race in the Pyeongchang Olympic downhill and has produced a fast practice run to set her up for Thursday's Alpine combined event. The American acknowledged feeling 'a little bit of relief' after the program changed late Monday. Organizers brought forward the combined by one day to avoid forecast strong winds. The demands of back-to-back race days meant Shiffrin opted out of Wednesday's downhill to focus on combined, which includes a run of slalom, her specialist discipline. Shiffrin posted the fifth-fastest time in Tuesday's practice. She is among the favorites to add the combined Olympic title to the giant slalom she won last Thursday. ___ 12:30 p.m. Lindsey Vonn used the final practice run before Wednesday's Pyeongchang Olympic downhill to test different racing lines on the course. Some worked, some didn't, and Vonn went outside a gate clocking the fourth-fastest time behind Ramona Siebenhofer of Austria on Tuesday. The American star says, 'Some of the lines I took today I think were faster. Others not.' Siebenhofer was 0.20 seconds faster than Michelle Gisin of Switzerland, whose sister Dominique tied for victory in the 2014 Olympic downhill. Nadia Fanchini of Italy was third, 0.21 behind the leader. Vonn was 0.29 back, having stood up and carved a turn before the finish line. Mikaela Shiffrin was fifth fastest, though she is preparing for the Alpine combined event on Thursday. Shiffrin will skip the downhill. ___ 12 p.m. Canada's Cassie Sharpe has given her country its first medal in Olympic freestyle halfpipe skiing. Sharpe posted the top two scores in the women's final at Phoenix Snow Park, with the 95.80 she put up during her second run the best of the finals. France's Marie Martinod added a second silver to go with the one she captured in Sochi four years ago when the sport made its Olympic debut. Martinod scored 92.60 on her second run but fell during her third to assure Sharpe of the gold. American Brita Sigourney edged teammate Annalisa Drew for bronze. Drew scored 90.80 on her final run to slip past Sigourney only to have Sigourney, the next skier down, put up a 91.80. Defending Olympic champion Maddie Bowman of the United States fell on the final hit during each of her three runs in the finals. ___ More AP Olympic coverage: https://wintergames.ap.org
  • Baker Mayfield doesn't like comparisons to Johnny Manziel, although the Heisman Trophy winner from Oklahoma wasn't surprised by them after an arrest and other antics during his time with the Sooners. At a stop in his home state of Texas to accept the Davey O'Brien Award as the nation's top quarterback, Mayfield said Monday he and Manziel were 'two completely different people.' Mayfield will be at the NFL combine next week and is projected as a possible first-round pick in the draft in April. It's been four years since Manziel, the first freshman to win the Heisman at Texas A&M in 2012, was taken 22nd overall by Cleveland and dumped after two trouble-filled seasons. A former Texas high school star like Mayfield, Manziel has been out of football for two years. After an offseason arrest for public intoxication and disorderly conduct, Mayfield planted an OU flag at midfield after a win at Ohio State. He made a lewd gesture toward the Kansas sideline after the Jayhawks refused to shake his hand before the coin flip. 'We're two completely different people,' Mayfield said. 'I've always been a team-oriented guy. Not saying that Johnny wasn't. But I've quickly earned the respect of my teammates because of how I worked. 'I wasn't given the natural talent that Johnny had. Because he's a talent. And there's a reason he got taken in the first round, amazing player. We're just not the same mentally. Just wired differently.' Mayfield acknowledged last weekend that NFL personnel have talked to him about having more awareness of his social media use and trying to stay out of trouble. But coaches have long praised his leadership and infectious energy. 'I've always been an outgoing person, somebody that's confident, somebody who has passion and energy for the game of football and for whoever I'm playing for, I'm going to be passionate about it,' said Mayfield, who broke his own single-season passing efficiency rating and threw for 4,627 yards and 43 touchdowns. After the Sooners lost to Georgia in the Rose Bowl in the national semifinals, Mayfield stayed in the Los Angeles area and has spent most of his time there preparing for the combine and draft. 'This process right now is different than anything of the stuff I've been through before because it's more individualized right now than anything else,' Mayfield said. 'Normally in the offseason I'm with the team. We're working toward one goal together.' The Kansas sideline incident cost Mayfield a start in his final home game when coach Lincoln Riley benched him. He also apologized for the flag plant. But Mayfield said the arrest in Arkansas last February is what braced him for the Manziel chatter. 'I didn't want to be portrayed as the villain or somebody like that,' Mayfield said. 'I do good things within my community. I'm not trying to say those cover up any mistakes that I've made. But there's always a learning curve when you're growing up.' And Mayfield knows where his career is taking him next. 'You get a bunch of grown men that work really hard, so it'll be different going from 18 (to) 22-year-olds to people that are feeding their families, their children,' Mayfield said. 'A lot of these guys make their money just based off work ethic and never quitting.' Mayfield thinks that's what he's bringing to the NFL, not Manziel-like baggage. ___ More AP NFL: https://pro32.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL ___ More AP college football: https://collegefootball.ap.org and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25