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    ATHENS – Nick Chubb and Sony Michel are literally best friends and I’m sure they honestly don’t care, but it’s going to be very interesting to see which of the Georgia running backs is picked first in the NFL draft. They’re also very competitive with each other, so I wouldn’t be surprised if there might be a friendly wager involved. I’ll say this, though: I expect both of them to be selected by the end of the second day of the April 26-28 draft at least. And, regardless, I predict NFL success for both of these guys. The general consensus coming out of this season seemed to be that Michel will be the first of the Dogs’ duo to go off the board. The narrative is that Michel is the more versatile of the two backs. That’s an assertion that Chubb didn’t necessarily disagree with. He told me as much at one of the College Football Playoff media days. He said that Michel was probably a little better catching the ball out of the backfield. Certainly statistics back that up. At the end of their careers, Chubb had 30 catches for 362 yards and 4 touchdowns while Michel basically doubled him up had 64 receptions for 621 yards and 6 scores. But it’s not like Michel was a part-time flanker or anything like that. He had nine catches for 96 yards and one touchdown all season, with the lone TD catch not coming until the playoffs. And Chubb was actually utilized more in that fashion as a freshman while he was sharing time with Todd Gurley. Kind of forgotten from that season was that Chubb had 18 catches for 213 yards and scored twice via the pass that year. So, it could be argued that disparity was as much a function of role as it was anything else. Which is another thing I always liked about these two guys. I always thought they were at their best when they were interviewed side-by-side. That’s when their personality differences were the most stark. In case you weren’t paying attention, Chubb was the quiet and reserved one while Michel was (slightly) more talkative and certainly more flashy from the standpoint of his alter-ego as rapper flyguy2stackz. But they were also a mutual admiration society. Michel never begrudged Chubb always being the starter in the rotation. He joked that meant that Chubb had the harder role, coming out Saturday after Saturday against defenses that were jacked to stuff the run and would be selling out like a flea market on run blitzes. “He’s the one that has to take all that contact,” Michel said earlier this past season. “He was softening them up for me.” That trend was reflected in their rushing stats each of the last two seasons. Michel averaged more yards per carry than Chubb both years, 5.5 to 5.0 as juniors and 7.9 to 6.4 as seniors. And that might ultimately tip the ledger in Michel’s favor when it comes to their draft prospects this spring. Without question, Michel arrives at this juncture with less wear-and-tear on his body. Chubb had 740 carries in his career with the Bulldogs while Michel had 591. And it was Chubb that had to have his left knee rebuilt after that awful incident in Knoxville in 2015. Michel has had his own share of twists, pulls and bruises. And he actually played in one more game (47) than did his roommate in college. This much is certain: Together they were nearly an unstoppable force for the Bulldogs. They’ll go down as one of the most prolific running back duos of all time. Separately, they finished as the second and third rushers of all time at Georgia, with 4,744 and 3,638 yards, respectively. Between them, they scored 90 touchdowns, with 51 of those in Chubb’s column. Only Herschel Walker, with 52, had more. Wrap your head around that for a minute. And that’s what NFL executives are going to have to ponder between now draft day. Which one of these guys goes first and how high will they be taken? That’s anybody’s guess at this point. The theory is that the running back position has been devalued by the proliferation of passing in the NFL game over the years. But backs keep getting drafted in the early rounds, including the first. LSU’s Leonard Fournette went on the fourth pick last year and made good on it with 1,040 yards rushing and nine touchdowns this season. Christian McCaffrey was also a first-round selection and eight backs were selected in the first three rounds. Included in that bunch was Toledo’s Kareem Hunt, who led the NFL in rushing this year with 1,327 yards and was named rookie of the year. And we all know what Georgia’s Todd Gurley has done for the Los Angeles Rams. Chubb and Michel’s former running mate had 1,305 yards rushing, 2,093 total yards and 19 touchdowns this past season. He said at the Rose Bowl he expects believes Chubb and Michel will both make great pros. As for their draft projections, they’re all over the board. Penn State’s Saquon Barkley is the consensus pick to be the first running back selected, followed by LSU’s Derrius Guice. Chubb and Michel generally are projected a little behind those guys, almost always close together and with no consensus as to which might be selected first. Of the different rankings I perused, Michel’s highest rating among draft-eligible backs was fourth by draftwire.com (which had Chubb fifth). WalterFootball.com had Michel fifth and Chubb sixth, while CBSSports.com have Michel sixth and Chubb seventh. But then, ESPNInsider had Chubb seventh and Michel ninth and DraftTek.com had Chubb sixth and Michel eighth. Then there was ESPN’s well-known draft expert Todd McShay, who had Chubb fourth and did not include Michel in his Top 10. Wrote McShay: “Chubb rushed for more than 100 yards in 13 straight games before tearing several knee ligaments (not including his ACL) in 2015. He didn’t have the same explosiveness in 2016 coming off the injury, but he has quick feet for his size (listed at 5-foot-10, 228 pounds). Right now, he projects as a Day 2 pick, but he could move up the boards if he can regain some of that agility.” If you know Chubb like I do, I’m sure he’s busy “regaining that agility” as we speak. But same for Michel. These two Dogs spent the last four years trying to out-do each other in the weight room and on the practice field and in games. Maybe one team will take a page out of Georgia’s book and draft both of these guys. Wouldn’t that be something? The post Nick Chubb or Sony Michel: Who goes first in NFL draft not a sure thing appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS – So Roquan Smith and Trent Thomson have packed their bags and joined Georgia’s giant pack of seniors in heading on down the road. This is what makes college football so great. This is also what makes it so hard. Georgia’s toughest task will be in finding another inside linebacker that can have near the impact that Roquan Smith did this past season. (Perry McIntyre Jr./UGA) College football, by and large, is cyclical. That works to varying degrees for different programs, but because of the constant ingress and egress of players due to graduation and attrition, achieving sustained, championship-level success is next to impossible for any program not currently named Alabama. To me, that’s what makes it fun and somewhat unpredictable from year to year. Alabama, at this place in time, is the exception. I know it’s still awfully soon in these parts to be offering the Crimson Tide any kudos but — those egregiously bad calls aside — Bama did, in fact, make it back to the penultimate game for a third year in a row. The past decade under coach Nick Saban has been, in a word, astonishing. The Tide has won five national championships in that span and more games than any team in America. Maybe the next 10 years will be similarly grand for Georgia. But that’s where coach Kirby Smart will have to distinguish himself as different from coaches that have preceded him. As we all know, Georgia is a very proud and successful football program by its own right. It is, after all, third all-time in number of bowl appearances with 53. Only Bama (66) and Texas (54) have more. But historically speaking, the Bulldogs have been the very the definition of cyclical when it comes to high-level success. Again, only Alabama (26) has won more SEC football championships than Georgia (13) over the years (the Bulldogs are tied with Tennessee). But as one might suspect, those have been few and far between in what we’d call the modern era, which would begin with Vince Dooley’s tenure back in 1964. Georgia won six SEC championships in 25 seasons under Dooley, or roughly one in every four seasons. Neither Ray Goff nor Jim Donnan were able to hoist the conference crown. Mark Richt won two in 15 seasons, while playing for it five times. Now Smart is a sporty 1-for-2. But that’s all about league titles. That’s no longer the ultimate measurement. Now it’s all about getting into the playoff. As Alabama can attest, you can do that without being a conference champion. Judging Georgia’s success more from the perspective of having good years – that is, winning a lot of games and playing in a good bowl – the Bulldogs’ cycle looks more like this: Dooley 12 of 25 seasons, or about half; Goff one in seven; Donnan one in five; Richt eight in 15 (I’m not counting the 10-win seasons that resulted in Taxslayer and Belk Bowl bids). Taken as a whole, that’s about 42 percent of the time Georgia has been in for a really fun and exciting season. We don’t need to discuss how it often it has played for the ultimate prize (OK, four times in 37 years, but I’m not discussing it). Back to the here and now, part of what makes it so difficult to regularly get your program “in the hunt,” as it were, is that cyclical tendency of the college game. If your team is good enough to compete for a championship, conference or national, then two factors are probably going to apply: One, it featured a lot of extremely talented players; two, it was veteran-laden and experienced. In both cases, they’re usually followed by an exodus. That was definitely the case for Georgia in 2017. As was well-chronicled all year, the Bulldogs featured a total of 31 seniors. Seventeen of those seniors were on scholarship. Fifteen of those would fall in the category of major contributors. At least four or five of them could be first or second-day NFL draftees. Then you add in the losses of the juniors Smith and Thompson to the NFL draft – a relatively light number given the level of success Georgia enjoyed — and you begin to get a sense of the talent deficit the Bulldogs are going to have to replenish if they are to have similar success in 2018. As for Smith, I don’t have to tell anybody who watched Georgia this season what kind of an absence he’s going to leave. He was a once-a-generation player, to be sure, as some of these Top 10 and 15 draft projections suggest. And Thompson, even though his junior season was less productive than the previous one, is a unique physical talent that will be difficult to replace. All told, that’s six starters off your offense, nine off the defense and two specialists. If not for junior Jonathan Ledbetter’s decision to return, it could’ve been a 7-for-7 loss of Georgia’s front seven. This is not to sprinkle doom-and-gloom over the prospects of next season for the Bulldogs. That’s just a little reality check on the challenge that’s in front of Smart and his staff. But as evidenced from this past season, I definitely believe they’re up for it. You can start with recruiting, where Smart is in the midst of building his third straight Top-10 class, each one better than the last. The current group is ranked No. 1, with only a handful targets remaining on the board after that smashing experiment that was the first year of an early-signing period. Georgia already has netted 20 actual signees, with at least five more on the way. None of which has slowed down the charge of Smart and his staff. Since the championship game ended, they hardly have even come up for air. They’re laser-focused on the remaining targets, all the elitist of the elite, while concentrating hard on prospects for 2019 and even ’20. It’s a luxury the Bulldogs can afford with the current state of affairs being what it is. But replacing seasoned veterans with unproven talent is always a risky proposition. Certainly it helps when they have a lot of stars by their name, but that’s no guarantee. Hopefully Georgia will get a nice blend of contribution from brilliant newcomers, developing lettermen and established stars. That certainly came to past this last season, though finding leadership to rival the group that just left will be the ultimate challenge. Of all this, Smart is well aware. He comes from a place that has been able to put all that back together on the regular. And he’s bringing all that knowledge to a place that’s been doing pretty doggone good as it is. Nobody has won more than Alabama over these last 10 years, games (125) or national championships (5). But Georgia hasn’t been all that far behind. The Bulldogs stand ninth in victories over that span with 96. The key is keeping those lows high and the highs at the very top of the mountain. Smart has given the Bulldogs a peek of that view. Everyone seems to be in agreement that they like it. Now, to find the next Roquan. … The post Greatest coaching challenge for Georgia’s Kirby Smart awaits him in 2018 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Every year we see a handful of prospects drastically improve their NFL draft stock with huge bowl game performances. This season, no player’s stock was helped more by a huge postseason than Georgia’s Sony Michel, according to a report by NFL.com’s Daniel Jeremiah.  Jeremiah polled a handful of NFL executives, asking which player helped himself the most in bowl season, with three of the five executives naming Michel as the biggest winner. One called Michel a “three-down back,” while another took things a step further by saying that Michel “separated himself from [Nick] Chubb.”  In his two College Football Playoff games, Michel totaled 320 yards from scrimmage and 4 touchdowns. His performance against Oklahoma was particularly monstrous, as he ran for 181 yards and 3 touchdowns on just 11 attempts, while also adding 4 catches for 41 yards and another touchdown.  At the moment, Michel is likely to go in Round 2 or 3, though he could continue to improve his stock with a big NFL combine or Georgia pro day.
  • ATHENS – Well, there goes Jacob Eason, headed back West, we assume. And there goes Trent Thompson, headed for the NFL. And just like that, the top players in Georgia’s classes of 2015 and ’16 are gone. No, surprise in either case, I’d say. As to how it might affect the 2018 Bulldogs, any loss of elite talents such as these two are is going to hurt your team. Sure, they will be replaced by others, but to assume that it will be an equal or even net gain trade-off would be foolhardy. But in each case the moves were made with their personal futures in mind, not Georgia’s. On that front, I’d argue that they were both justified and understandable. Eason should arrive back in Lake Stevens, Wash., with his bags packed full of good will and kudos from the Bulldog Nation. I certainly hope he does. The kid certainly didn’t do anything wrong. In fact, I’d go as far as saying he did everything right. There’s no question he did once that fateful injury sidelined him on Sept. 2, 2017. Running to the sideline under pressure from an Appalachian State defender, Eason caught a little shove in the back as he was heading out of bounds. That little bit of force caused him to land awkwardly on his left leg as he tried to step over the yard-marking chain and all sorts of other sideline flotsam with those long and lanky legs. It was just enough to sprain the medial collateral ligament and sideline him for at least four weeks. Then the world discovered Jake Fromm. The true freshman from Houston County, who thought he might play in garbage time that day, had to scramble to throw on his helmet and get in the game. Fifteen games and 13 wins later, it was only at garbage that he ever left a game the rest of the way. The season didn’t end until this past Monday when Georgia fell short in the CFP Championship game against Alabama, 26-23 in overtime. There were a lot of reasons why the Bulldogs lost, but quarterback play wasn’t one of them. One of the memorable scenes for me at the end of that heartbreaking loss involved Eason. The former 5-star quarterback prospect nicknamed “Skinny” – who’s not so skinny anymore — waited inside the tunnel leading to Georgia’s locker room for Fromm to come off the field. There Eason greeted his road-game roommate with a hug and put his arm around Fromm as they made their way out of the limelight. Eason told us out in Los Angeles during Rose Bowl preparations that he healthy enough to play again by midseason. But Georgia, offensive coordinator Jim Chaney would also attest, made the choice to stick with Fromm, who at that point remained undefeated and was improving at an incredible rate with each week. All the while, Eason kept preparing and staying ready if called on while also supporting his position-mate. As he said, he always remained “a play away.” The Seattle Times, citing “several sources,” reported days ago that Eason was transferring to Washington, his home-state school located 45 minutes away from his home in Lake Stevens. For what it’s worth, Eason’s father told me in a text they “aren’t a source” and “I don’t know where that came from.” So Eason may or may not be headed there, but I have no reason to doubt that very reputable news outlet. If he does land at UW, Eason will have to sit out a year. But the biggest thing will be his proximity to home. Think about these last two years for the Eason family. They’ve made the trip from Seattle to Atlanta multiple times and were pretty much everywhere Georgia was all this season. They were doing that not knowing whether their kid, the one they call “Jake,” would get in and knowing he probably wouldn’t. Another year or so of that didn’t make much sense. To have their son just down the road and in position to come him every holiday does, regardless of future prospects. As for Thompson, his decision doesn’t surprise me in the least. Though he was largely insulated from interacting with the media very much since he arrived at UGA, I felt like I knew Thompson pretty well. I spent a couple of days with him down there in Albany for a Next Generation piece I did the week he graduated from Westover High School. I sat in his house and talked to his mom and aunt and little brother and rode around town with Trent and met his uncle down at his Goodtimes restaurant on South Slappey Boulevard. Thompson is a great college player who probably could benefit from another year in school to improve his draft status and all that. But there’s also a lot of people in Albany hoping and praying for him to earn living to help out all his loved ones down there who have lifted him up so much the last several years. Clearly, Thompson had some medical problems that led to that rather high-profile incident on campus last February. He also battled shoulder and knee injuries that forced him to miss a lot of playing time this season. As a result, Thompson didn’t have as exceptional a season as he did as a sophomore. But he made it through 15 games still upright and still made a lot of plays for the Bulldogs, including three tackles in the championship game. Still walking and relatively healthy after all that, I’m sure that made him think, “I better do this while I can.” Thompson likely won’t be the last of the underclassmen leaving Georgia after this magical season. Linebacker Roquan Smith almost certainly will be next. He’s getting some Top 10 projections in NFL mock drafts. There’s no guarantee, but that’s like winning the lottery, for you and me. So I’m sure no one will begrudge Smith whenever he makes that decision. There might be others. Jonathan Ledbetter has been pretty adamant that he’s coming back, and that’s a very good thing for Georgia if he does. Cornerback Deandre Baker and center Lamont Gaillard are among those who were still thinking about it late in the year. It’d be worth their while to remain in college, in my opinion. But who knows. I saw some fans post on social media that Friday’s news was adding to their depression from having lost the national championship to Alabama. But it shouldn’t. This is just the price of doing business on this level. This is why Kirby Smart remains such a relentless recruiter and tries to stack 5-stars on top of 5-stars at every position. As for the quarterback position, I think the Bulldogs will be fine. Certainly there are some depth concerns. But in addition to getting Justin Fields ready to play fast, the Bulldogs also have Stetson Bennett waiting in the wings. Scoff if you want, but it has been a long time since I’ve heard as many players and coaches rave about a scout team quarterback the way they have Bennett. I’m convinced he could handle anything Georgia needed if pressed into service. Meanwhile, I’ll watch with great interest how Eason’s future unfolds. He gave Georgia all he had and remained a good teammate and friend when things didn’t go his way. He told me in L.A. he thought things would have gone just as well for the Bulldogs had he not gotten injured because of the tremendous team chemistry and overall talent this team possessed. Alas, we’ll never know. But Eason should also leave knowing there’s a whole nation of Bulldogs rooting for him going forward. Unless and until they run into each other in the playoffs one day. And even then they’ll probably hope he plays well. I know I will. The post Can’t really begrudge these two Bulldogs for their decisions to leave appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Georgia junior football player Rashad Roundtree announced he is giving up football due to concussions, which caused him to miss most of this past season. Roundtree, a reserve at safety and inside linebacker, revealed the news in a series of Twitter messages he posted on Wednesday. > Also: Read more about concussions in college athletics, and the steps some schools are taking to minimize concussion-related injuries on myAJC.com “As a result of a number of concussions, it is with a heavy heart that I announce that my journal in the path of football has come to an end,” Roundtree wrote. “As a child, all of my dreams involved playing football and it deeply saddens me that I can’t play anymore. I want to humbly thank everyone that has supported me and who continue to support me. “From little league, to middle school, through high school and now at Georgia my life has always been filled with football. My best memories involve being out on the field with my boys and with my family in the crowd cheering me.” Roundtree did not play this season. He did not practice for the latter part of the season. Head coach Kirby Smart said that Roundtree was dealing with injuries. An AJC Super 11 selection in 2014 out of Lakeside High in Evans, Roundtree played in 24 games as a freshman and sophomore, mostly on special teams. He began as a safety, briefly tried inside linebacker in 2016, the moved back to the secondary. It is unclear whether Roundtree will remain at UGA on scholarship, but that is usually an option in medical cases. Roundtree could take a medical disqualification, allowing the team to keep him on scholarship but not having him count against the team’s NCAA scholarship limit of 85. > Also: Read more about concussions in college athletics, and the steps some schools are taking to minimize concussion-related injuries on myAJC.com
  • ATHENS, Ga. — Georgia’s Yante Maten was named to the Midseason Top-25 list for the John R. Wooden Award, presented by Wendy’s, the Los Angeles Athletic Club announced on Thursday. Maten, a 6-8, 243-pound, forward from Pontiac, Mich., is in the midst of a standout senior season for the Bulldogs and currently ranks second in the SEC in scoring at 19.3 ppg and first in rebounding at 8.9 rpg. He also is among league leaders in minutes played (fifth), field goal percentage (seventh) and free throw percentage (10th).  Maten has scored in double figures in 14 of the Bulldogs’ 15 games, with seven 20-point outputs and seven double-doubles. He scored a season-high 30 points against Temple, his fifth career 30-point outing and third career 30-point, 10-rebound performance. Earlier this season, Maten joined the Bulldogs’ top-10 carer leaders in both points and rebounds. He currently ranks No. 8 in both scoring (1,539 points) and rebounding (740 boards), as well as No. 4 in blocked shots (167), No. 5 in free throws made (410) and No. 6 in free throw attempts (547). Maten, who is the SEC’s active career leader in points, rebounds, blocks and double-doubles, was one of two league players on the 25-player Wooden ledger. Chosen by a poll of national college basketball experts based on their performances during the first half of the 2017-18 season, the list comprises of 25 student-athletes who are front-runners for the sport’s most prestigious honor. The players on the list are considered strong candidates for the 2018 John R. Wooden Award presented by Wendy’s.  The leading candidates will be further pared to 20 top players in early February. Fifteen top players who have proven to their universities that they are also making progress toward graduation and maintaining at least a cumulative 2.0 GPA will be submitted to voters on the Final Ballot prior to the NCAA Tournament.  Every year, players have made the Final Ballot that were not on the preseason or midseason lists. Voters are permitted to take into consideration the opening rounds of the NCAA Tournament when casting the ballot. The 10-man Wooden Award All American Team will be announced the week of the “Elite Eight” round of the NCAA Tournament. The winner of the 2018 John R. Wooden Award will be presented during the ESPN College Basketball Awards presented by Wendy’s on Friday, April 6, 2018. Created in 1976, the John R. Wooden Award is the most prestigious individual honor in college basketball. It is bestowed upon the nation’s best basketball player at an NCAA Division I university who has proven to his university that he is making progress towards graduation and maintaining a minimum cumulative 2.0 GPA. Previous winners include Larry Bird (’79), Michael Jordan (’84), Tim Duncan (’97), and last year’s recipient, Frank Mason III of Kansas. Georgia is currently 11-4 on the season and 2-2 in SEC play. The Bulldogs return home on Saturday at 1:00 p.m. to host South Carolina at Stegeman Coliseum, where Georgia is a perfect 8-0 this season. The game is a sell-out The only seats that remain are the free 2,000 tickets for UGA students that will be distributed beginning at 11:30 a.m. on Saturday.
  • Vegas oddsmakers like what they saw from Georgia’s freshman quarterback Jake Fromm. The Bulldogs’ signal caller opens with the best odds to win the 2018 Heisman Trophy. Fromm finished his first year with 2,615 passing yards and 24 touchdowns. Also among the leading contenders is Fromm teammate D’Andre Swift. The freshman rushed for 618 yards and 3 touchdowns behind senior running backs Nick Chubb and Sony Michel. Fromm was the starter in the Bulldogs’ College Football Playoff Championship loss to Alabama. Oklahoma’s Baker Mayfield won the 2017 Heisman Trophy. Top 10 (+1) 2018 Heisman favorites • Jake Fromm, QB, Georgia: 10/1• Trace McSorley, QB, Penn State: 14/1• Jonathan Taylor, RB, Wisconsin: 14/1• D’Andre Swift, RB, Georgia: 14/1• Bryce Love, RB, Stanford: 15/1• Shea Patterson, QB, Michigan: 16/1• Jarrett Stidham, QB, Auburn: 20/1• Khalil Tate, QB, Arizona: 20/1• Jalen Hurts, QB, Alabama: 22/1• Kelly Bryant, QB, Clemson: 25/1• Tua Tagovailoa, QB, Alabama: 50/1
  • ATHENS — Jeff Dantzler still hasn’t gotten over it. Not Georgia’s overtime loss to Alabama Monday night in the College Football Playoff Championship. I’m talking about the Bulldogs’ loss to Pitt in the Sugar Bowl on Jan. 1, 1982. Dantzler Same goes for Georgia’s loss to Penn State in the Sugar Bowl the next year, Jan. 1, 1983. That one still stings for Dantzler, too, then a 10-year-old superfan. Both of those games were remarkably similar to the one we witnessed at Mercedes-Benz Stadium earlier this week. That is, each of those contests had national championship implications and also were decided by a long, heart-piercing touchdown pass late in the game. But, 35 years later, this one had some added layers of drama. It was in overtime. It was in Atlanta. It was against Alabama. It was Kirby Smart versus Nick Saban. And there were some really bad calls. This one hurt more. “This was Pitt, Penn State and Bama in 2012 rolled into one,” said Dantzler, now an Athens radio talk-show host and play-by-play commentator on the Bulldogs. “It’s the most heartbreaking loss in Georgia history. And it comes at the end of what was, without a doubt, one of the greatest and most enjoyable seasons in history.” That’s the sad reality about Monday’s game. If you’re like Dantzler — a dyed-in-wool, live-and-die-with-the-team, life-long fan — you’re not going to all the sudden get over this. You’re not going to wake up next Thursday and instantly become OK with the outcome. Not according to Dantzler. His steel-trap memory and lifelong association with the school and its athletic program have made him into a resident historian for the Bulldogs along the lines of Loran Smith and the late Dan Magill. But the passion with which he follows Georgia places him even closer to the most fervent of fans. He has never denied being a fan first and media personality second. And he comes about it honestly. Dantzler watched the game against Pitt on New Years Day in 1981 on TV at home in Statesboro. The Bulldogs needed to beat the Panthers in the Sugar Bowl and Clemson to lose to Nebraska in the Orange Bowl to repeat as national champions. And it looked like Georgia was going to take care of its end of the deal as Pitt faced fourth-and-13 at the Bulldogs’ 33 inside the final minute. But quarterback Dan Marino hit tight end John Brown with a touchdown pass with 35 seconds remaining to score a 24-20 upset. “We blitzed and (linebacker) Knox Culpepper got pulled down by his facemask,” Dantzler recounted. “I was so mad I was beside myself. I was back in my room still crying when my dad came in. He said, ‘if it makes you feel any better, Clemson won anyway.’ I told him to get out of my room.” The next year was even worse because Dantzler’s parents took him to the game in New Orleans. This time Georgia trailed the whole time but was mounting a comeback when Todd Blackledge hit Greg Garity on a 47-yard bomb in the fourth quarter. The Nittany Lions hung on to win 27-23 to secure the national championship and give the Bulldogs their only loss of the year. Dantzler said his mother insisted on him wearing the new Herschel Walker jersey he’d bought him rather than the tattered old sweatshirt he’d always worn for good luck. Sure it was his fault, he told her he’d never forgive her. “I’ll never forget those games,” Dantzler said. “I think about the Pitt and Penn State games every day in my life.” So, like Dantzler, you diehards will probably never forget about Georgia vs. Alabama on Jan. 8, 2018. You’ll never forget them leading 13-0 at halftime. You’ll never forget Jake Fromm’s 80-yard touchdown pass to Mecole Hardman. And you’ll never forget Rodrigo Blankenship’s 51-yard field goal in overtime. You’ll also remember DeVonta Smith zipping past Malkom Parrish into a remarkably open end zone and hauling in Tua Tagovailoa’s perfectly-thrown 41-yard pass for the game-winning touchdown on second-and-26 in overtime. Nor will you forget everything that happened in between. All indications are the Bulldogs were victims of some incredibly bad calls — or no-calls — from the Big Ten officiating crew. We’ve all seen the replays now that seem to validate that. It appears not only that Tyler Simmons was not offsides when he blocked a punt deep in Alabama territory early in the third quarter, but that the Crimson Tide actually false-started as well. Georgia’s offense was headed in the wrong direction at the time, but had a flag been thrown for a facemask as it should have when D’Andre Swift was dropped for an 8-yard, the Bulldogs would have had a first down at midfield and at least swapped field position before a possession in which Alabama scored its first touchdown. It certainly looks like a Bama receiver moved up field too soon on fourth-and-four at the Georgia 7 late in the quarter. A penalty there would have nullified Calvin Ridley’s TD catch and probably forced a short field goal try from the Tide’s ill-fated kicker, Andy Pappanastos. For that it’s worth, I followed up on all that with the CFP folks and with the Big Ten. I was told by the CFP the NCAA selects from what conference the officiating crew is chosen for the championship game and the conference itself chooses those officials. I was told to contact the Big Ten’s supervisor of officials, Adam Augustine, for comment on any specifics calls that took place in the game or any other details I might be interested in. I did that via phone call and email and haven’t heard back. And probably won’t. It won’t change anything anyway. The name “Alabama” has already been etched on the championship trophy for the year of 2017. At the same time, the memories of that game and this season have been etched onto our brains. Whether we want to or not, if you paid close attention and you care, you’re not going to forget about that game even if you want to. “Obviously the zebras didn’t help,” Dantzler said. “I a couple of those are correctly made, maybe the outcomes different. I don’t know if that makes it tougher or makes it easier. Same thing with their kicker. I almost wished he’d just made the kick in regulation rather than to lose in overtime like we did. “But it was just an unbelievable season and I do have full faith and confidence that we’re going back and will have a shot to win it all.” Hopefully it just won’t be 35 years this time.       The post Bad calls or not, there’s really no getting over Georgia’s loss to Bama in title game appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Some fans who attended the College Football Playoff National Championship game at Mercedes-Benz Stadium on Monday night voiced their frustration over the security lines to get into the stadium. “It’s just been a cluster,” fan Everett Stubbs said. People said they waited in line for 90 minutes to get in to see the game they paid thousands of dollars to attend. 'This line is, like, a mile long to get in. I don't understand it. Same number of people coming to this that were coming to the SEC championship. Why can't we get in?' fan Lara Long said. College Football Playoff executive director Bill Hancock said it was a perfect storm of thousands of fans showing up at the same time as President Donald Trump. 'I'm very sorry. When you have a president visit, security trumps everything, so to speak, and we're just very sorry that people were inconvenienced,' Hancock said. Unlike other big games, the Secret Service ran the security show, cranking up the sensitivity on metal detectors, among other things. 'The Secret Service people are very professional. They were good to work with, but there were some curveballs that we did not anticipate,' Hancock said. One of those curveballs was a nearly hourlong closure of one of the stadium's main gates before and during President Trump's arrival that sent stadium leaders scrambling. 'In real time, we were looking at it, saying, 'OK. Here's what we can do now. Boy I wish maybe we did this differently,'' said Mercedes-Benz Stadium general manager Scott Jenkins. Jenkins said stadium officials will work to make sure it doesn't happen again. 'We'll learn and make some adjustments next time, but we really are dependent on the Secret Service and how they want to manage the president's arrival, so if it happens again, next time we will certainly be reminding them of the impacts it has to our guests,' he said. A spokesperson for the Secret Service sent the following statement. '(The agency) created a screening plan that was reflective of presidential-level security for the college football championship game. By kickoff, all fans who'd arrived with enough time to allow for screening were inside the venue.
  • Georgia sophomore quarterback Jacob Eason is expected to transfer to Washington as long as he doesn’t have a “last-minute change of heart,” the Seattle Times reported Tuesday morning. Eason, from Lake Stevens, Wash., played behind freshman Jake Fromm for nearly the entire 2017 season after suffering a knee injury in Georgia’s season opener against Appalachian State.  In compliance with NCAA transfer rules, Eason would have to sit out the 2018 season, but would have two seasons of eligibility remaining, beginning in 2019. In 2019, Eason would most likely compete for starting quarterback spot after current quarterback, junior Jake Browning, runs out of eligibility. During the early signing period, Washington signed quarterbacks Jacob Sirmon (No. 30 on 2018 ESPN100) and Colson Yankoff (No. 92 on 2018 ESPN100). Sirmon and Yankoff have both enrolled at Washington and will compete alongside  Jake Haener— who will be a redshirt freshman in 2018— and current freshman Daniel Bridge-Gadd.  Four-star quarterback Dylan Morris out of Graham-Kapowsin High School in Graham, Wash. is also committed to the Huskies’ 2019 recruiting class. The news of Eason’s expected transfer comes less than 24 hours after Georgia lost the College Football Playoff National Championship to Alabama, 26-23. As a freshman, Eason threw for 2,430 yards, 16 touchdowns and eight interceptions, leading the Bulldogs to an 8-5 overall record including a win over TCU in the Liberty Bowl. This season, Eason played in three games and threw for 28 total yards, registering a quarterback rating of 90.7.

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  • ATHENS – Nick Chubb and Sony Michel are literally best friends and I’m sure they honestly don’t care, but it’s going to be very interesting to see which of the Georgia running backs is picked first in the NFL draft. They’re also very competitive with each other, so I wouldn’t be surprised if there might be a friendly wager involved. I’ll say this, though: I expect both of them to be selected by the end of the second day of the April 26-28 draft at least. And, regardless, I predict NFL success for both of these guys. The general consensus coming out of this season seemed to be that Michel will be the first of the Dogs’ duo to go off the board. The narrative is that Michel is the more versatile of the two backs. That’s an assertion that Chubb didn’t necessarily disagree with. He told me as much at one of the College Football Playoff media days. He said that Michel was probably a little better catching the ball out of the backfield. Certainly statistics back that up. At the end of their careers, Chubb had 30 catches for 362 yards and 4 touchdowns while Michel basically doubled him up had 64 receptions for 621 yards and 6 scores. But it’s not like Michel was a part-time flanker or anything like that. He had nine catches for 96 yards and one touchdown all season, with the lone TD catch not coming until the playoffs. And Chubb was actually utilized more in that fashion as a freshman while he was sharing time with Todd Gurley. Kind of forgotten from that season was that Chubb had 18 catches for 213 yards and scored twice via the pass that year. So, it could be argued that disparity was as much a function of role as it was anything else. Which is another thing I always liked about these two guys. I always thought they were at their best when they were interviewed side-by-side. That’s when their personality differences were the most stark. In case you weren’t paying attention, Chubb was the quiet and reserved one while Michel was (slightly) more talkative and certainly more flashy from the standpoint of his alter-ego as rapper flyguy2stackz. But they were also a mutual admiration society. Michel never begrudged Chubb always being the starter in the rotation. He joked that meant that Chubb had the harder role, coming out Saturday after Saturday against defenses that were jacked to stuff the run and would be selling out like a flea market on run blitzes. “He’s the one that has to take all that contact,” Michel said earlier this past season. “He was softening them up for me.” That trend was reflected in their rushing stats each of the last two seasons. Michel averaged more yards per carry than Chubb both years, 5.5 to 5.0 as juniors and 7.9 to 6.4 as seniors. And that might ultimately tip the ledger in Michel’s favor when it comes to their draft prospects this spring. Without question, Michel arrives at this juncture with less wear-and-tear on his body. Chubb had 740 carries in his career with the Bulldogs while Michel had 591. And it was Chubb that had to have his left knee rebuilt after that awful incident in Knoxville in 2015. Michel has had his own share of twists, pulls and bruises. And he actually played in one more game (47) than did his roommate in college. This much is certain: Together they were nearly an unstoppable force for the Bulldogs. They’ll go down as one of the most prolific running back duos of all time. Separately, they finished as the second and third rushers of all time at Georgia, with 4,744 and 3,638 yards, respectively. Between them, they scored 90 touchdowns, with 51 of those in Chubb’s column. Only Herschel Walker, with 52, had more. Wrap your head around that for a minute. And that’s what NFL executives are going to have to ponder between now draft day. Which one of these guys goes first and how high will they be taken? That’s anybody’s guess at this point. The theory is that the running back position has been devalued by the proliferation of passing in the NFL game over the years. But backs keep getting drafted in the early rounds, including the first. LSU’s Leonard Fournette went on the fourth pick last year and made good on it with 1,040 yards rushing and nine touchdowns this season. Christian McCaffrey was also a first-round selection and eight backs were selected in the first three rounds. Included in that bunch was Toledo’s Kareem Hunt, who led the NFL in rushing this year with 1,327 yards and was named rookie of the year. And we all know what Georgia’s Todd Gurley has done for the Los Angeles Rams. Chubb and Michel’s former running mate had 1,305 yards rushing, 2,093 total yards and 19 touchdowns this past season. He said at the Rose Bowl he expects believes Chubb and Michel will both make great pros. As for their draft projections, they’re all over the board. Penn State’s Saquon Barkley is the consensus pick to be the first running back selected, followed by LSU’s Derrius Guice. Chubb and Michel generally are projected a little behind those guys, almost always close together and with no consensus as to which might be selected first. Of the different rankings I perused, Michel’s highest rating among draft-eligible backs was fourth by draftwire.com (which had Chubb fifth). WalterFootball.com had Michel fifth and Chubb sixth, while CBSSports.com have Michel sixth and Chubb seventh. But then, ESPNInsider had Chubb seventh and Michel ninth and DraftTek.com had Chubb sixth and Michel eighth. Then there was ESPN’s well-known draft expert Todd McShay, who had Chubb fourth and did not include Michel in his Top 10. Wrote McShay: “Chubb rushed for more than 100 yards in 13 straight games before tearing several knee ligaments (not including his ACL) in 2015. He didn’t have the same explosiveness in 2016 coming off the injury, but he has quick feet for his size (listed at 5-foot-10, 228 pounds). Right now, he projects as a Day 2 pick, but he could move up the boards if he can regain some of that agility.” If you know Chubb like I do, I’m sure he’s busy “regaining that agility” as we speak. But same for Michel. These two Dogs spent the last four years trying to out-do each other in the weight room and on the practice field and in games. Maybe one team will take a page out of Georgia’s book and draft both of these guys. Wouldn’t that be something? The post Nick Chubb or Sony Michel: Who goes first in NFL draft not a sure thing appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS – So Roquan Smith and Trent Thomson have packed their bags and joined Georgia’s giant pack of seniors in heading on down the road. This is what makes college football so great. This is also what makes it so hard. Georgia’s toughest task will be in finding another inside linebacker that can have near the impact that Roquan Smith did this past season. (Perry McIntyre Jr./UGA) College football, by and large, is cyclical. That works to varying degrees for different programs, but because of the constant ingress and egress of players due to graduation and attrition, achieving sustained, championship-level success is next to impossible for any program not currently named Alabama. To me, that’s what makes it fun and somewhat unpredictable from year to year. Alabama, at this place in time, is the exception. I know it’s still awfully soon in these parts to be offering the Crimson Tide any kudos but — those egregiously bad calls aside — Bama did, in fact, make it back to the penultimate game for a third year in a row. The past decade under coach Nick Saban has been, in a word, astonishing. The Tide has won five national championships in that span and more games than any team in America. Maybe the next 10 years will be similarly grand for Georgia. But that’s where coach Kirby Smart will have to distinguish himself as different from coaches that have preceded him. As we all know, Georgia is a very proud and successful football program by its own right. It is, after all, third all-time in number of bowl appearances with 53. Only Bama (66) and Texas (54) have more. But historically speaking, the Bulldogs have been the very the definition of cyclical when it comes to high-level success. Again, only Alabama (26) has won more SEC football championships than Georgia (13) over the years (the Bulldogs are tied with Tennessee). But as one might suspect, those have been few and far between in what we’d call the modern era, which would begin with Vince Dooley’s tenure back in 1964. Georgia won six SEC championships in 25 seasons under Dooley, or roughly one in every four seasons. Neither Ray Goff nor Jim Donnan were able to hoist the conference crown. Mark Richt won two in 15 seasons, while playing for it five times. Now Smart is a sporty 1-for-2. But that’s all about league titles. That’s no longer the ultimate measurement. Now it’s all about getting into the playoff. As Alabama can attest, you can do that without being a conference champion. Judging Georgia’s success more from the perspective of having good years – that is, winning a lot of games and playing in a good bowl – the Bulldogs’ cycle looks more like this: Dooley 12 of 25 seasons, or about half; Goff one in seven; Donnan one in five; Richt eight in 15 (I’m not counting the 10-win seasons that resulted in Taxslayer and Belk Bowl bids). Taken as a whole, that’s about 42 percent of the time Georgia has been in for a really fun and exciting season. We don’t need to discuss how it often it has played for the ultimate prize (OK, four times in 37 years, but I’m not discussing it). Back to the here and now, part of what makes it so difficult to regularly get your program “in the hunt,” as it were, is that cyclical tendency of the college game. If your team is good enough to compete for a championship, conference or national, then two factors are probably going to apply: One, it featured a lot of extremely talented players; two, it was veteran-laden and experienced. In both cases, they’re usually followed by an exodus. That was definitely the case for Georgia in 2017. As was well-chronicled all year, the Bulldogs featured a total of 31 seniors. Seventeen of those seniors were on scholarship. Fifteen of those would fall in the category of major contributors. At least four or five of them could be first or second-day NFL draftees. Then you add in the losses of the juniors Smith and Thompson to the NFL draft – a relatively light number given the level of success Georgia enjoyed — and you begin to get a sense of the talent deficit the Bulldogs are going to have to replenish if they are to have similar success in 2018. As for Smith, I don’t have to tell anybody who watched Georgia this season what kind of an absence he’s going to leave. He was a once-a-generation player, to be sure, as some of these Top 10 and 15 draft projections suggest. And Thompson, even though his junior season was less productive than the previous one, is a unique physical talent that will be difficult to replace. All told, that’s six starters off your offense, nine off the defense and two specialists. If not for junior Jonathan Ledbetter’s decision to return, it could’ve been a 7-for-7 loss of Georgia’s front seven. This is not to sprinkle doom-and-gloom over the prospects of next season for the Bulldogs. That’s just a little reality check on the challenge that’s in front of Smart and his staff. But as evidenced from this past season, I definitely believe they’re up for it. You can start with recruiting, where Smart is in the midst of building his third straight Top-10 class, each one better than the last. The current group is ranked No. 1, with only a handful targets remaining on the board after that smashing experiment that was the first year of an early-signing period. Georgia already has netted 20 actual signees, with at least five more on the way. None of which has slowed down the charge of Smart and his staff. Since the championship game ended, they hardly have even come up for air. They’re laser-focused on the remaining targets, all the elitist of the elite, while concentrating hard on prospects for 2019 and even ’20. It’s a luxury the Bulldogs can afford with the current state of affairs being what it is. But replacing seasoned veterans with unproven talent is always a risky proposition. Certainly it helps when they have a lot of stars by their name, but that’s no guarantee. Hopefully Georgia will get a nice blend of contribution from brilliant newcomers, developing lettermen and established stars. That certainly came to past this last season, though finding leadership to rival the group that just left will be the ultimate challenge. Of all this, Smart is well aware. He comes from a place that has been able to put all that back together on the regular. And he’s bringing all that knowledge to a place that’s been doing pretty doggone good as it is. Nobody has won more than Alabama over these last 10 years, games (125) or national championships (5). But Georgia hasn’t been all that far behind. The Bulldogs stand ninth in victories over that span with 96. The key is keeping those lows high and the highs at the very top of the mountain. Smart has given the Bulldogs a peek of that view. Everyone seems to be in agreement that they like it. Now, to find the next Roquan. … The post Greatest coaching challenge for Georgia’s Kirby Smart awaits him in 2018 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Every year we see a handful of prospects drastically improve their NFL draft stock with huge bowl game performances. This season, no player’s stock was helped more by a huge postseason than Georgia’s Sony Michel, according to a report by NFL.com’s Daniel Jeremiah.  Jeremiah polled a handful of NFL executives, asking which player helped himself the most in bowl season, with three of the five executives naming Michel as the biggest winner. One called Michel a “three-down back,” while another took things a step further by saying that Michel “separated himself from [Nick] Chubb.”  In his two College Football Playoff games, Michel totaled 320 yards from scrimmage and 4 touchdowns. His performance against Oklahoma was particularly monstrous, as he ran for 181 yards and 3 touchdowns on just 11 attempts, while also adding 4 catches for 41 yards and another touchdown.  At the moment, Michel is likely to go in Round 2 or 3, though he could continue to improve his stock with a big NFL combine or Georgia pro day.
  • ATHENS – Well, there goes Jacob Eason, headed back West, we assume. And there goes Trent Thompson, headed for the NFL. And just like that, the top players in Georgia’s classes of 2015 and ’16 are gone. No, surprise in either case, I’d say. As to how it might affect the 2018 Bulldogs, any loss of elite talents such as these two are is going to hurt your team. Sure, they will be replaced by others, but to assume that it will be an equal or even net gain trade-off would be foolhardy. But in each case the moves were made with their personal futures in mind, not Georgia’s. On that front, I’d argue that they were both justified and understandable. Eason should arrive back in Lake Stevens, Wash., with his bags packed full of good will and kudos from the Bulldog Nation. I certainly hope he does. The kid certainly didn’t do anything wrong. In fact, I’d go as far as saying he did everything right. There’s no question he did once that fateful injury sidelined him on Sept. 2, 2017. Running to the sideline under pressure from an Appalachian State defender, Eason caught a little shove in the back as he was heading out of bounds. That little bit of force caused him to land awkwardly on his left leg as he tried to step over the yard-marking chain and all sorts of other sideline flotsam with those long and lanky legs. It was just enough to sprain the medial collateral ligament and sideline him for at least four weeks. Then the world discovered Jake Fromm. The true freshman from Houston County, who thought he might play in garbage time that day, had to scramble to throw on his helmet and get in the game. Fifteen games and 13 wins later, it was only at garbage that he ever left a game the rest of the way. The season didn’t end until this past Monday when Georgia fell short in the CFP Championship game against Alabama, 26-23 in overtime. There were a lot of reasons why the Bulldogs lost, but quarterback play wasn’t one of them. One of the memorable scenes for me at the end of that heartbreaking loss involved Eason. The former 5-star quarterback prospect nicknamed “Skinny” – who’s not so skinny anymore — waited inside the tunnel leading to Georgia’s locker room for Fromm to come off the field. There Eason greeted his road-game roommate with a hug and put his arm around Fromm as they made their way out of the limelight. Eason told us out in Los Angeles during Rose Bowl preparations that he healthy enough to play again by midseason. But Georgia, offensive coordinator Jim Chaney would also attest, made the choice to stick with Fromm, who at that point remained undefeated and was improving at an incredible rate with each week. All the while, Eason kept preparing and staying ready if called on while also supporting his position-mate. As he said, he always remained “a play away.” The Seattle Times, citing “several sources,” reported days ago that Eason was transferring to Washington, his home-state school located 45 minutes away from his home in Lake Stevens. For what it’s worth, Eason’s father told me in a text they “aren’t a source” and “I don’t know where that came from.” So Eason may or may not be headed there, but I have no reason to doubt that very reputable news outlet. If he does land at UW, Eason will have to sit out a year. But the biggest thing will be his proximity to home. Think about these last two years for the Eason family. They’ve made the trip from Seattle to Atlanta multiple times and were pretty much everywhere Georgia was all this season. They were doing that not knowing whether their kid, the one they call “Jake,” would get in and knowing he probably wouldn’t. Another year or so of that didn’t make much sense. To have their son just down the road and in position to come him every holiday does, regardless of future prospects. As for Thompson, his decision doesn’t surprise me in the least. Though he was largely insulated from interacting with the media very much since he arrived at UGA, I felt like I knew Thompson pretty well. I spent a couple of days with him down there in Albany for a Next Generation piece I did the week he graduated from Westover High School. I sat in his house and talked to his mom and aunt and little brother and rode around town with Trent and met his uncle down at his Goodtimes restaurant on South Slappey Boulevard. Thompson is a great college player who probably could benefit from another year in school to improve his draft status and all that. But there’s also a lot of people in Albany hoping and praying for him to earn living to help out all his loved ones down there who have lifted him up so much the last several years. Clearly, Thompson had some medical problems that led to that rather high-profile incident on campus last February. He also battled shoulder and knee injuries that forced him to miss a lot of playing time this season. As a result, Thompson didn’t have as exceptional a season as he did as a sophomore. But he made it through 15 games still upright and still made a lot of plays for the Bulldogs, including three tackles in the championship game. Still walking and relatively healthy after all that, I’m sure that made him think, “I better do this while I can.” Thompson likely won’t be the last of the underclassmen leaving Georgia after this magical season. Linebacker Roquan Smith almost certainly will be next. He’s getting some Top 10 projections in NFL mock drafts. There’s no guarantee, but that’s like winning the lottery, for you and me. So I’m sure no one will begrudge Smith whenever he makes that decision. There might be others. Jonathan Ledbetter has been pretty adamant that he’s coming back, and that’s a very good thing for Georgia if he does. Cornerback Deandre Baker and center Lamont Gaillard are among those who were still thinking about it late in the year. It’d be worth their while to remain in college, in my opinion. But who knows. I saw some fans post on social media that Friday’s news was adding to their depression from having lost the national championship to Alabama. But it shouldn’t. This is just the price of doing business on this level. This is why Kirby Smart remains such a relentless recruiter and tries to stack 5-stars on top of 5-stars at every position. As for the quarterback position, I think the Bulldogs will be fine. Certainly there are some depth concerns. But in addition to getting Justin Fields ready to play fast, the Bulldogs also have Stetson Bennett waiting in the wings. Scoff if you want, but it has been a long time since I’ve heard as many players and coaches rave about a scout team quarterback the way they have Bennett. I’m convinced he could handle anything Georgia needed if pressed into service. Meanwhile, I’ll watch with great interest how Eason’s future unfolds. He gave Georgia all he had and remained a good teammate and friend when things didn’t go his way. He told me in L.A. he thought things would have gone just as well for the Bulldogs had he not gotten injured because of the tremendous team chemistry and overall talent this team possessed. Alas, we’ll never know. But Eason should also leave knowing there’s a whole nation of Bulldogs rooting for him going forward. Unless and until they run into each other in the playoffs one day. And even then they’ll probably hope he plays well. I know I will. The post Can’t really begrudge these two Bulldogs for their decisions to leave appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Georgia junior football player Rashad Roundtree announced he is giving up football due to concussions, which caused him to miss most of this past season. Roundtree, a reserve at safety and inside linebacker, revealed the news in a series of Twitter messages he posted on Wednesday. > Also: Read more about concussions in college athletics, and the steps some schools are taking to minimize concussion-related injuries on myAJC.com “As a result of a number of concussions, it is with a heavy heart that I announce that my journal in the path of football has come to an end,” Roundtree wrote. “As a child, all of my dreams involved playing football and it deeply saddens me that I can’t play anymore. I want to humbly thank everyone that has supported me and who continue to support me. “From little league, to middle school, through high school and now at Georgia my life has always been filled with football. My best memories involve being out on the field with my boys and with my family in the crowd cheering me.” Roundtree did not play this season. He did not practice for the latter part of the season. Head coach Kirby Smart said that Roundtree was dealing with injuries. An AJC Super 11 selection in 2014 out of Lakeside High in Evans, Roundtree played in 24 games as a freshman and sophomore, mostly on special teams. He began as a safety, briefly tried inside linebacker in 2016, the moved back to the secondary. It is unclear whether Roundtree will remain at UGA on scholarship, but that is usually an option in medical cases. Roundtree could take a medical disqualification, allowing the team to keep him on scholarship but not having him count against the team’s NCAA scholarship limit of 85. > Also: Read more about concussions in college athletics, and the steps some schools are taking to minimize concussion-related injuries on myAJC.com