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Probably only one consensus All-American for UGA so far, and he’s a good one

Probably only one consensus All-American for UGA so far, and he’s a good one

Probably only one consensus All-American for UGA so far, and he’s a good one

Probably only one consensus All-American for UGA so far, and he’s a good one

UGA Roquan Smit

ATHENS – He stands 6-foot-1 and weighs 225 pounds. He says right now, in the middle of the football season, he’d probably run a 40-yard dash in about 4.5 seconds. But, he said, “with a little training I’m probably a 4.4 guy,” and he’s clocked it before.

No, we’re not talking about an SEC tailback here. But anybody who has seen Roquan Daevon Smith run knows he’d probably make a pretty good one. In fact, that’s where he started out playing in high school.

“I realized early I didn’t like taking the blows, I liked delivering them,” Smith said during the Bulldogs’ preparations for Auburn this week.

Georgia is now benefiting from Smith’s strike-first mindset. More than anything else, it’s Smith’s tailback speed while operating at his middle linebacker position that his put the “Junkyard” back in the Bulldogs’ defense.

“It’s that speed,” senior noseguard John Atkins said when asked what make Smith’s the linebacker he is for the Bulldogs. “Roquan has always been a special player because he can run sideline to sideline. I always say, if I have Roquan and Lorenzo (Carter) on the field with me, that means I don’t have to run too far.”

Smith’s speed and skill will be put the ultimate test on Saturday when the No. 1-ranked Bulldogs face No. 10 Auburn and its high-powered offense at Jordan-Hare Stadium (3:30 p.m., CBS).

There are a lot of exceptional players on Georgia’s team this year, Carter being another one. That goes without saying seeing how the Bulldogs are undefeated through nine games and ranked No. 1 in the country. But at this point, Smith is probably only player on UGA’s roster who’s assured of being named a first-team All-American.

Or, at least, it’d be an egregious oversight if he was not.

Smith is as good of an inside linebacker as I’ve had the pleasure of observing in all my years covering Georgia. The junior from Montezuma is the leading tackler on Georgia’s Top 5 defense. That, in and of itself, is not that big of a deal. Linebackers are designed to make tackles, so most of them tend to lead their team in that category.

Smith leads the Bulldogs with 70 tackles. That’s a lot – 7.8 per game — but not anywhere close to the most in the SEC. He ranks 11th in the league. LSU’s Devin White tops the conference with 89, or 9.9 per game.

Smith gives Georgia so much more than that, however. His ability to anticipate where a play is headed and not lose sight of the football amid all the chaos and misdirection is what is setting him apart.

Asked what has allowed Smith to take his play to another level this season, Georgia coach Kirby Smart said: “I’d say his understanding of the defense is much better, but his leadership is even greater than that.

“He has not been afraid to speak when he’s felt strongly about something,” Smart said. “That’s a rare trait in a junior. He’s not worried what other people think about him, and that’s the way leaders have to be, and he’s been that way.”

There’s no telling the number of plays that Smith affects without actually being involved in the tackle. Smith prides himself on being just as fast as whatever play-maker an opponent plans to exploit the defense. Sometimes he’s asked to key on an opposing quarterback, sometimes it’s a running back, sometimes he’s just following the ball.

But if the intention is to get ahead of the pursuit on the outside, it’s Smith’s intent to make sure he beats them there.

“I definitely take pride in that,” Smith said. “I want to make sure early that they know I’ll be here all night, so be expecting that. There’s a sense of pride when you see someone you know is pretty fast, too. I’m a fierce competitor, so I just take great pride in that.”

Everybody on the team knew Smith was an exceptional player when he showed up on campus. Smith had been highly recruited. He was a 4-star prospect coming out of Macon County High in Montezuma. But so is pretty much everybody who signs with Georgia.

But early on, in some of his first workouts at Georgia, Smith’s teammates could tell they were dealing with an extraordinary athlete.

“We were running stadiums when he first got here and he just took off,” senior linebacker Reggie Carter said. “Everybody’s running and he just shoots out ahead. You could just see the athletic traits that he possessed. During camp his freshman year, he didn’t know the defense as well, but he showed flashes with all the athletic stuff he did. We knew then he was going to be a great player.”

It’s not just speed that’s getting Smith notice now. He has made a concerted effort to become “a student of the game.”

“I have a lot of God-given ability, a lot of instincts, but I actually watch a lot of film,” Smith said. “Knowing your opponent is half the battle. People say 90 percent of it is mental and 10 is physical. So, throughout the week I’m always watching film.”

Some of that development was a by-product of Smith being sidelined in the spring. He underwent off-season shoulder surgery, which meant he was held out of contact.

“He was out there behind the huddle, taking the steps, had a script in his hand,” Smart said. “It bothered him that he wasn’t able to practice. He didn’t lay back and just relax and have a good time. He was very businesslike and very professional in his approach when he was not in, and I think that’s helped him have better junior year.”

Said Smith: “You can see things from a coaches’ perspective, and that was big, I think, for my learning curve. I feel like I learned a lot during that time.”

It’s definitely showing now. As the Bulldogs have shot up the national rankings both on defense and as a team, there has been a lot more exposure for everyone involved. And whenever people are talking about what makes Georgia great, they start with that nationally-rated defense and that linebacker that wears No. 3 in the middle of it.

And Smith is getting his just due. He was named a midseason first-team All-American by The Associated Press and several other such polls.

The Bulldogs will be depending on Smith a lot Saturday against Auburn’s high-scoring offense. The Tigers feature the SEC’s leading rusher in running back Kerryon Johnson (124 ypg) and the league leader in completion percentage in quarterback Jarrett Stidham.

As much as Smith has been preparing for those guys, you can be sure they’re preparing for No. 3 in the middle of the Georgia defense as well.

Smith’s jacked for the challenge.

“They do a lot of things on offense, have a lot of eye candy and window dressing,” Smith said. “They do a lot of rockets and things like that. You have to have eye discipline and read what you have to read and not be looking all over the field. … It’s moreso, find the ball and hit the person with the ball. That’s simple enough.”

That has certainly worked for Smith so far. Keep it simple and overwhelm them with speed.

The post Probably only one consensus All-American for UGA so far, and he’s a good one appeared first on DawgNation.

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Georgia Sports News

  • ATHENS — Deangelo Gibbs will not be with the Georgia football team this spring, but it appears he will be for the 2018 season. Gibbs, who is not enrolled in classes this spring because of an unspecified medical issue, has also been dealing with a left shoulder injury. Head coach Kirby Smart sounded optimistic when asked Tuesday about the sophomore’s status going forward. “He’s doing very well with rehab. We anticipate a full return in the fall,” Smart said. Gibbs was contending for a starting spot during the 2017 preseason, ultimately losing out to his cousin J.R. Reed. For most of the season Gibbs ran with the second team at cornerback and nickel back, then late in the season he left the team for what was termed a “medical issue.” Then it emerged in January that Gibbs was not enrolled in classes for the spring semester. If available, Gibbs would be a contender again for a starting spot in a secondary that lost three starters. The only returning starters are top cornerback Deandre Baker and safety J.R. Reed, leaving openings at safety, cornerback and nickel back. (Richard LeCounte is a favorite to start at safety, while the other two spots are a bit more open.) Meanwhile, inside linebacker Natrez Patrick is with the team and is expected to be a full participant in spring practice. Patrick missed Georgia’s playoff run because he entered drug treatment, as part of an issue arising from a probation violation. That took away someone who had started for the better part of the previous two seasons. After returning to the team, Patrick re-enrolled in class at UGA this semester, with his lawyer saying his client hoped to return to the field this season. In another good sign, Patrick was recently named one of the team’s student-athletes of the week, an academic recognition. “He’s done everything we’ve asked,” Smart said on Tuesday. “He’s working hard on and off the field.” Patrick would be a huge lift to a defense that loses the majority of its starters, including all four linebackers who started in the Rose Bowl and national championship. When healthy and eligible, Patrick has been one of the team’s steadiest defensive players. He was second on the team in tackles in 2016, trailing only Roquan Smith. Last year Patrick started seven games, missing four games with a suspension and then both playoff games.       The post Deangelo Gibbs expected to make ‘full return’ to Georgia football team appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Georgia will be without two offensive linemen this spring, as well as five-star tailback recruit Zamir White, the latter of which is not a surprise. White tore his ACL near the end of his high school season. He enrolled early at Georgia and has been rehabbing in Athens since January. “He’s progressing very well,” Smart said of White. “He’ll be able to do some things. But he won’t be full-contact for spring.” Two reserve offensive linemen will also miss spring practice: Justin Shaffer and Sean Fogarty also suffered knee injuries, but are expected back for the season, according to Smart. “They’ll fine. They’ll be back in full go,” Smart said. “But they will not be out there practicing for the spring.” Shaffer, who will be a sophomore this season, played in eight games last year as a reserve. He was expected to compete to be on the two-deep at guard. Fogarty, a walk-on, was the second team center last season.   The post Georgia injury updates: Zamir White, Justin Shaffer and Sean Fogarty appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Georgia has changed roles on its offensive staff, with Jim Chaney and James Coley moving around and Coley gaining the co-offensive coordinator title. Coley, who received interest from Texas A&M this offseason, is now the quarterbacks coach. Chaney, who had been the quarterbacks coach, is now the tight ends coach. Chaney retains the coordinator of offensive coordinator, without the “co” in front of it. Coley does have a background coaching the position: He was the quarterbacks coach for Miami from 2013-15 while he was also the offensive coordinator there. And he began his coaching career coaching quarterbacks at the high school level, at Miami Senior High School from 1997-99, and he was later the QB coach at Florida International in 2007. (He also has experience coaching tight ends, which he did for five years at Florida State.) In fact, this stint at Georgia was the first time Coley served as a receivers coach. Coley received a significant raise this season, up to $850,000 from $450,000. That made him the third-highest paid assistant coach, behind Chaney and defensive coordinator Mel Tucker. Georgia’s salary pool for assistant coaches this year is $6.42 million, an increase from $4.56 million last year. (Read more on that here.)   The post Kirby Smart announces new roles for James Coley and Jim Chaney on Georgia staff appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Here’s a look at the next five offseason key dates on the NFL/Falcons calendar: March 25-28: Annual league meetings in Orlando April 16: Teams with returning head coaches can begin offseason workout programs. April 26-28: NFL draft in Arlington, Texas May 4-7 or 11-14: Teams may hold their one three-day post-draft rookie minicamp Friday through Sunday or Saturday through Monday. May 21-23: Spring league meeting, Atlanta Bow Tie Chronicles: D. Orlando Ledbetter discusses what’s ahead for Matt Ryan Never miss a minute of what’s happening with the Atlanta Falcons. Subscribe to myAJC.com