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    The Associated Press on Monday announced that award-winning journalist Susannah George will join its Washington bureau to cover U.S. intelligence agencies and national security. The appointment was announced by Julie Pace, AP's Washington bureau chief. 'Susannah is a dogged reporter with a track record of producing standout journalism on complex issues,' Pace said. 'In her new role as an intelligence reporter, she will be an integral part of our Washington-based national security team.' George, 33, joined the AP in 2015 and has led coverage from the Baghdad bureau. She was a member of the team of journalists who won the Overseas Press Club awards this year for coverage of the Islamic State and the fight for Mosul. Her Mosul coverage was also part of a larger body of work named as a Pulitzer Prize finalist this year. George is also a 2018 Livingston Award finalist for international reporting. George has spent much of her career overseas, covering conflict in Gaza, the NATO bombing campaign in Libya and uprisings in Egypt. She began her career in the U.S. as a producer for National Public Radio, covering elections, natural disasters and gun violence. A native of Connecticut, George grew up in the Middle East between Gaza, Ramallah and Jerusalem.
  • Richard N. Goodwin, an aide, speechwriter and liberal force for the Kennedys and Lyndon Johnson who helped craft such historic addresses as Robert Kennedy's 'ripples of hope' and LBJ's speeches on civil rights and 'The Great Society,' died Sunday evening at age 86. Goodwin, the husband of Pulitzer Prize winning historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, died at his home in Concord, Massachusetts. According to his wife, he died after a brief bout with cancer. Goodwin was among the youngest members of President John F. Kennedy's inner circle and among the last survivors. Brilliant and contentious, with thick eyebrows and a mess of wavy-curly hair, the cigar-smoking Goodwin rose from a working class background to the Kennedy White House before he had turned 30. He was a Boston native and Harvard Law graduate who specialized in broad, inspirational rhetoric — top JFK speechwriter Theodore Sorensen was a mentor — that 'would move men to action or alliance.' Thriving during an era when few feared to be called 'liberal,' Goodwin also worked on some of Lyndon Johnson's most memorable domestic policy initiatives, including his celebrated 'We Shall Overcome' speech. But he differed with the president about Vietnam, left the administration after 1965 and would later contend — to much debate — that Johnson may have been clinically paranoid. Increasingly impassioned through the latter half of the '60s, he co-wrote what many regard as then- Sen. Robert Kennedy's greatest speech, his address in South Africa in 1966. Kennedy bluntly attacked the racist apartheid system, praised protest movements worldwide and said those who speak and act against injustice send 'forth a tiny ripple of hope.' Goodwin's opposition to the Vietnam conflict led him to write speeches in 1968 for Kennedy and to manage the presidential campaign for anti-war candidate Sen. Eugene McCarthy. But McCarthy faded, Kennedy ('My best and last friend in politics,' Goodwin wrote) was assassinated and Republican Richard Nixon was elected president. Goodwin never worked for another administration, although he and his wife were fixtures in the Democratic Party and he continued to comment on current affairs for Rolling Stone, The New Yorker and other publications. In 2000, he was called upon for one of the least glamorous jobs in speechwriting history: Al Gore's concession to George W. Bush after a deadlocked race that ended with a 5-4 Supreme Court decision in Bush's favor. Goodwin was admired for his rare blend of poetry and political savvy, and criticized for being all too aware of his talents. Even one of his supporters, historian and fellow Kennedy insider Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr., would say that he 'probably lacked tact and finesse.' But Schlesinger also regarded Goodwin as the 'archetypal New Frontiersman' of JFK's brief presidency. 'Goodwin was the supreme generalist,' Schlesinger wrote in his Pulitzer Prize-winning 'A Thousand Days,' published in 1965, 'who could turn from Latin America to saving the Nile Monuments, from civil rights to planning a White House dinner for the Nobel Prize winners, from composing a parody of Norman Mailer to drafting a piece of legislation, from lunching with a Supreme Court Justice to dining with Jean Seberg — and at the same time retain an unquenchable spirit of sardonic liberalism and unceasing drive to get things done.' Richard Naradof Goodwin was born in Boston on Dec. 7, 1931, but spent part of his childhood in suburban Maryland, where he would recall being harassed and beaten because he was Jewish. His enemies only inspired him. He graduated summa cum laude from Tufts University, at the top his class from Harvard Law School, then clerked for Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter, the first of a series of powerful men Goodwin worked under. His road to Kennedy's 'Camelot' began not with an election, but with the corruption of TV game shows. He was an investigator in the late '50s for the Legislative Oversight Subcommittee of the U.S. House of Representatives, which helped reveal that the popular 'Twenty One' program was rigged. Goodwin's recollections were adapted into the 1994 film 'Quiz Show,' directed by Robert Redford and featuring Rob Morrow as Goodwin, who was one of the producers. 'Quiz Show' received four Academy Award nominations, including for best picture, but was criticized for inflating Goodwin's role in uncovering the scandal. His efforts were noticed by Kennedy, then a U.S. senator from Massachusetts and aspiring presidential candidate. Goodwin was hired to write speeches for the 1960 race, advised Kennedy for his landmark television debates with Nixon and held a number of positions in the administration, from assistant special counsel in the White House to an adviser on Latin America. When the president was assassinated in 1963, Goodwin took on a sensitive task — prodding the military to act upon Jacqueline Kennedy's wishes and place an eternal flame at the national cemetery in Arlington, Virginia. Under Kennedy, Goodwin's most ambitious work may have been on the Alliance for Progress, a program of economic and social reforms meant to break the U.S. from its history of supporting dictators in Latin America. The Alliance was announced in March 1961 with a promise from Kennedy that the spirit would not be 'an imperialism of force or fear but the rule of courage and freedom and hope for the future of man.' In the long term, the alliance had mixed results, as support dropped among subsequent administrations. In the short run, it was overshadowed by an imperialist fiasco, the Bay of Pigs invasion, the failed U.S.-backed attempt in April 1961 to overthrow Cuba's socialist government, led by Fidel Castro. Goodwin had questioned the plan, but still had to answer for it. Not long after the Bay of Pigs, he met with Castro ally and finance minister Ernesto 'Che' Guevara, the two of them sitting on the floor of a hotel room in Monte Video, Uruguay. They were both in town for an Inter-American conference that was to ratify the alliance. 'But, of course, when we started this conversation though, he said, 'Mr. Goodwin, I'd like to thank you for the Bay of Pigs,'' Goodwin recalled during a joint 2007 appearance with his wife at the John F. Kennedy library in Boston. 'He said, 'We were a pretty shaky middle class, support was uncertain, and this solidified everything for us.' So what could I say? I knew he was right.' After Kennedy's death, Goodwin was urged — implored — to stay on by the new president: 'You're going to be my voice, my alter ego,' Goodwin remembered Lyndon Johnson saying. There was constant tension between Johnson, a Texan, and the 'Harvards' around Kennedy, but Goodwin initially had strong influence and was an essential shaper of LBJ's legacy. He was assigned key policy speeches, including the 1964 address at the University of Michigan, when Johnson outlined his domestic vision of a 'Great Society.' Johnson's 1965 civil rights speech to a joint session of Congress is among the most famous presidential orations in history. It was written by Goodwin — within hours, he alleged — in the wake of the bloody marches in Selma, Alabama, and ended with an exhortation, drawing upon the language of the protest movement, that reportedly left the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in tears. 'Their cause must be our cause, too,' Johnson said. 'Because it is not just negroes, but all of us who must overcome the crippling legacy of bigotry and injustice. And we shall overcome.' Upon signing the Voting Rights Act in August 1965, Johnson gave the pen to Goodwin. But by then, LBJ had committed ground troops to Vietnam and Goodwin was personally and professionally estranged. He had become convinced, he later wrote, that 'President Johnson's always large eccentricities had taken a huge leap into unreason.' 'My conclusion is that President Johnson experienced certain episodes of what I believe to have been paranoid behavior,' he wrote in 'Remembering America,' published in 1988. 'I do not use this term to describe a medical diagnosis. I am not L.B.J.'s psychiatrist, nor am I qualified to be. I base my judgment purely on my observation of his conduct during the little more than two years I worked for him.' Goodwin's theory was widely debated. He was backed by Time magazine journalist Hugh Sidey, while former Johnson aide Jack Valenti said Goodwin was simply trying 'to flog a book.' Goodwin was married for 14 years to Sandra Leverant, who died in 1972. Three years later, he married Doris Kearns, a former LBJ aide who became one of the country's most popular historians with such works as 'Team of Rivals' and 'No Ordinary Time.' Goodwin had three children, one with his first wife and two with his second. Goodwin's other books included 'Triumph or Tragedy: Reflections on Vietnam,' released shortly after he left the Johnson administration and 'Promises to Keep.' He also wrote a play, 'The Hinge of the World' (later retitled 'Two Men of Florence'), a drama about the clash between Galileo Galilei and Pope Urban VIII that reflected on the need to raise 'poor, lowly creatures' from ignorance so they could 'travel the Heavens.' 'And how is this mighty liberation accomplished?' Goodwin wrote. 'Not through holy text. By these hands, these eyes, this brain. The skull of a single being imprisons the power to unravel creation, to encompass and describe the entire world. Why, this teaches man they may regain our native, the dominion granted Adam in their days of innocence. Creatures who can accomplish this have such power, they are almost like Gods.
  • Meghan Markle has offered a glimpse of how she sees her new role as the Duchess of Sussex in two new pages posted on the royal website hours after the former actress married Britain's Prince Harry. The newly minted duchess' pages highlight her focus on social issues and notes that she campaigned successfully at age 11 to have a company change the sexist language it used to sell dishwashing soap. The 'About the Duchess of Sussex' page also pointed out that she volunteered at a soup kitchen in Los Angeles' Skid Row and worked at another kitchen in Canada while working as an actress in Toronto. 'I am proud to be a woman and a feminist,' the page quotes her as saying. A second 'biography' page mentions her education, first at the Hollywood Little Red Schoolhouse, Immaculate Heart High School and Northwestern University, where she earned a double major in theater and international relations. It also discusses the seven years she spent playing Rachel Zane in the U.S. television drama 'Suits.' 'Whilst working on Suits, the duchess moved to Toronto, Canada where the show was filmed; she feels very connected to Canada, as it became a second home to her,' the biography said. Prince Harry and Markle were named the Duke and Duchess of Sussex as they were married Saturday at St. George's Chapel in Windsor.
  • Aww! Model, TV host and cookbook author Chrissy Teigen took to Instagram on Sunday to share a sweet photo and reveal the name of her newborn son. >> Chrissy Teigen, John Legend welcome baby boy 'Hello, world! This is Miles Theodore Stephens,' Teigen wrote. 'We are drowning in his little peeps and nuzzles. Our household feels overwhelmed with love. Thank you for all your well wishes!' >> See the post here Meanwhile, Teigen's husband, singer John Legend, shared the same photo with the caption: 'Our new love, Miles Theodore Stephens.' It's the first photo the celebrity couple has shared of their second child, who joins big sister Luna, 2. >> Read more trending news  On Thursday, Teigen announced that the baby boy had arrived but did not give any other details. 'Somebody’s herrrrrrre!' she tweeted at the time. >> See the tweet here Read more here.
  • Patients at St. Joseph's Hospice in London received a special gift after Saturday's royal wedding. >> Meghan Markle's rescue dog, Guy the beagle, goes from shelter pup to royal pet According to People magazine, Britain's Prince Harry and bride Meghan Markle, now the Duchess of Sussex, gave the hospice some flowers that had been used to decorate St. George's Chapel for their ceremony. >> Royal wedding: Kitty Spencer stuns with resemblance to her aunt, Princess Diana 'Today we got a very special delivery. Beautiful bouquets made from the #royalwedding flowers which we gave to our patients,' the hospice wrote on Facebook, along with a photo of a smiling patient holding a bouquet. 'A big thank you to Harry and Meghan and florist Philippa Craddock. Our hospice smells and looks gorgeous. Such a lovely gesture.' >> See the post here >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news  Meanwhile, Markle sent her bridal bouquet to Westminster Abbey 'to rest on the Grave of the Unknown Warrior,' a tribute to those who died in World War I and other military conflicts, according to a press release. >> Read more trending news  'This is a tradition which was begun by HM Queen Elizabeth, the Queen Mother, at her marriage to King George VI in memory of her brother Fergus who was killed in 1915 at the Battle of Loos during the First World War,' the release said. >> See the photo here
  • A Portuguese theater director has cancelled his attendance at a major cultural festival opening in Jerusalem this week over Israel's treatment of the Palestinians. Tiago Rodrigues said he was dropping out of the Israel Festival so that his work will not 'condone and promote a government that deliberately violates human rights.' In a Facebook post on Thursday, he said he was joining a global cultural boycott of Israel that has seen some artists and musicians refuse to perform in Israel. Rodrigues, who is also an actor and playwright, said he rejected the fact that the festival was not openly critical of Israel's treatment of the Palestinians while working in cooperation with Israeli government ministries. The annual Israel Festival, which hosts Israeli and international performers, said it was disappointed by Rodrigues' decision. 'The Israel Festival has a deep belief in the power of art to express new points of reference, open up people to the recognition of the 'other,' and to promote understanding and tolerance,' festival CEO Eyal Sher said in a statement. Rodrigues' declaration came after Israeli forces shot and killed nearly 60 Palestinians during a violent protest last week along the border with the Gaza Strip. His cancellation follows international fallout from that violence. Israel faced global condemnation over what critics say was its excessive use of force.
  • The New York Police Department is investigating allegations of sexual misconduct leveled against celebrity chef Mario Batali. The NYPD confirmed the probe following a '60 Minutes' broadcast Sunday night in which an unnamed woman accused Batali of drugging and sexually assaulting her in 2005. She says she remembers joining him for a glass of wine at a Manhattan restaurant, then waking up on the floor feeling drugged and assaulted. She says she talked to the police but never filed a report. Batali issued a statement to CBS denying that he assaulted the woman. Batali stepped down from daily operations at his restaurant empire and cooking show 'The Chew' in December after four women accused him of inappropriate touching over a period of 20 years. Batali has apologized for those encounters.
  • International stars of acting, music and sports have urged Indonesia's president to ban what they say is a 'brutal' trade in dog and cat meat for human consumption. The appeal comes after Indonesian campaigners against animal cruelty and Humane Society International in January exposed markets on the island of Sulawesi where dogs were bludgeoned by the thousands and blow-torched alive to remove their hair before onlookers, including children. The letter to President Joko 'Jokowi' Widodo released Monday said if Indonesia joined other Asian nations that have already banned the cruel trade, it would be 'celebrated globally' and end a stain on the country's reputation. The coalition of campaigners, calling itself Dog Meat-Free Indonesia, also warned of health risks posed by the trade due to its potential to spread rabies. 'These animals, many of them stolen pets, are subjected to crude and brutal methods of capture, transport and slaughter, and the immense suffering and fear they must endure is heartbreaking and absolutely shocking,' the letter said. Actress Cameron Diaz, talk show host Ellen DeGeneres, talent spotter Simon Cowell, comedian Ricky Gervais, Indonesian pop singer Anggun and musician Moby are among the more than 90 celebrities listed in the letter. Dog meat is eaten by only a small percentage of Indonesians, but in a country of more than 250 million people it still represents a significant trade. Thousands of dogs and cats are slaughtered weekly in North Sulawesi, most of which are imported from other provinces in Indonesia, according to the anti-animal cruelty groups. After the blaze of bad publicity in January, the infamous Tomohon Extreme Market in North Sulawesi stopped the public slaughter of dogs, but video shot by campaigners showed dog carcasses were still being delivered from other locations. 'We are so grateful to these global and Indonesian superstars who have come together to support Dog Meat-Free Indonesia's efforts to end this cruel and dangerous industry,' Humane Society International President Kitty Block said in a statement. 'We respectfully urge President Widodo to work with us on a solution that protects not only Indonesia's dogs and cats but also the health of its people,' she said.
  • The Latest on the Billboard Music Awards (all times local): 7:18 p.m. The youngest of the legendary Jackson musical family, Janet Jackson gave her first televised performance in nine years at the Billboard Music Awards. She was honored as the first black woman to receive the Billboard Icon Award on Sunday in Las Vegas, where she performed a trio of her songs, including 'Nasty,' ''If' And 'Throb.' Surrounded by dozens of dancers and wearing gold thigh-high boots, she showed off her well-known dance skills to get the audience up on their feet. Bruno Mars made a surprise appearance to introduce the singer, who earned the Icon Award on Sunday. Jackson used her speech to pay tribute to powerful women. __ 6:55 p.m. Shawn Mendes and Khalid sang a song called 'Youth' at the Billboard Music Awards in Las Vegas backed by a choir of students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, which was also the site of a shooting earlier this year. Khalid, who won best new artist earlier during Sunday's broadcast, wore a shirt calling for the protection of children instead of guns, while the choir of students from Parkland, Florida, wore black hoodies with the word 'Youth.' The performance earned them a standing ovation from the audience. ___ 5:15 p.m. Kelly Clarkson tearfully called for a moment of change, instead of a moment of silence for the victims of a school shooting in Santa Fe, Texas, at the opening of the Billboard Music Awards in Las Vegas. The awards show host, who is from Texas, said as she held back tears that moments of silence are not working, but 'why don't we change what's happening' Ariana Grande then started the Billboard Music Awards with a performance of her new single 'No Tears Left To Cry,' in all black with a platinum blonde ponytail. ___ 3:38 a.m. After celebrating her 52nd birthday and the 25th anniversary of her groundbreaking 'janet.' album, Janet Jackson will be capping off an epic week with her first televised performance in nine years at the Billboard Music Awards. Jackson will also receive the Icon Award on Sunday at the MGM Grand Garden Arena in Las Vegas, where today's hitmakers will also hit the stage, from Ariana Grande to John Legend. The show will air live on NBC at 8 p.m. Eastern. Others set to take the stage include BTS, Jennifer Lopez, Shawn Mendes, Dua Lipa, Christina Aguilera, Demi Lovato, Kesha and Salt-N-Pepa. Kelly Clarkson will host the three-hour awards show. Kendrick Lamar, Bruno Mars and Ed Sheeran tie for the most nominations with 15 each. __ This story has been corrected to fix the time on the third item to 6:55 p.m. instead of 7:55 p.m.
  • Chrissy Teigen and John Legend now have a baby boy to go with their toddler girl. The 32-year-old model and 39-year-old singer, whose real name is John Roger Stephens, introduced Miles Theodore Stephens to the world on Sunday. Teigen had been hinting to her millions of social media followers for several days that the baby was here, and the couple announced in January that they were having a boy. Teigen finally confirmed it with Instagram and Twitter posts and a picture. She said on Instagram that she and Legend are 'drowning in his little peeps and nuzzles' and their 'household feels overwhelmed with love.' Teigen tweeted that Miles arrived 'a few weeks early' but gave no other details. Teigen and Legend, who married in 2013, have a 2-year-old daughter, Luna.