ON AIR NOW

LISTEN NOW

Weather

cloudy-day
72°
Isolated Thunderstorms
H 90° L 70°
  • cloudy-day
    72°
    Current Conditions
    Isolated Thunderstorms. H 90° L 70°
  • partly-cloudy-tstorms-day
    85°
    Afternoon
    Isolated Thunderstorms. H 90° L 70°
  • cloudy-day
    81°
    Evening
    Partly Cloudy. H 90° L 70°
LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Morning show on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

Home team on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

LISTEN
PAUSE
ERROR

The crossover on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Lifestyles

    Most people aren't too happy when they encounter a spider, and that's especially true if the creepy-crawly you come across happens to be dangerously venomous. >> Brown recluse spiders: 4 things to know as the dangerous pests become more active Although it's understandable to be anxious about venomous spiders, it’s important to know the difference between a harmless spider and a dangerous one. Here are some important tips from experts on dealing with venomous spiders and what to do if you think you’ve been bit. Identify types of venomous spiders Even if you think you've been bitten by a spider, most are actually harmless, according to the Mayo Clinic.  Only a few types have venom strong enough to harm you and fangs (yikes!) long enough to penetrate your skin. Venomous spiders found in the Southeast include: Black widow – identified by the pattern of red coloration on the underside of its abdomen. Brown widow – identified by an orange hourglass shape on a brown body Brown recluse – identified by its brown color and dark violin-shaped marking on its head. (Identifications from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and UGA Extension) >> 10 ways to prevent tick bites on people and pets Wear gloves when you're working outside or in the garage If you stick your bare hand into some brush, you may be bitten by a brown or black widow. Although they usually try to avoid people, they don't have a choice if you accidentally wrap your hand around one, according to UGA Extension. Be sure to wear long sleeves and gloves when you're cleaning in the garage, clearing brush or pulling a log off a woodpile. Look out for your clothes and shoes Black and brown widows can also hide in clothes and shoes that have been left outside, UGA Extension advised. The best solution is to not leave these items outside (or in your garage) if you can possibly avoid it, and, if not, make sure you shake them out and check them carefully before putting them on. Use insect repellent The Mayo Clinic recommends using an insect repellent containing DEET on your clothes and shoes. >> Dangerous plant that causes blindness, 3rd degree burns found in multiple states, officials say Don't create a habitat your home Don't store firewood against your house, since it can serve as a haven for spiders which can then find their way inside. The same is true for piles of rocks or lumber near your home. Clean up spider webs If you see a spider web inside your home, vacuum it up, put it in a sealed bag and dispose of it outside. Make it harder for spiders to get inside your home Make sure you have screens on your windows and doors that fit tightly. Seal any cracks where spiders could work their way into your home. Recognize the signs of a bite Many spider bites go unnoticed or cause only an itchy bump. However, if you have any of the following symptoms, you may have been bitten by a venomous spider and should seek medical attention, according to the Mayo Clinic: >> Read more trending news  Pain – starting around the bite mark and possibly spreading to the abdomen, back or chest Abdominal cramping – can be severe Excessive sweating Fever Chills Body aches Skin that becomes dark blue or purple and develops into a deep open sore
  • A Canadian mother is warning other parents about the dangers of indoor heatstroke after her daughter endured a frightening ordeal. Jennifer Abma of Edmonton, Alberta, told 'Today' that she was keeping her daughters inside when a heatwave hit their town. Her 3-year-old daughter, Anastasia, went upstairs to take a nap a few weeks ago after playing with her 1-year-old sister. An hour and a half later, Jennifer went to check on the her and discovered the room was roasting hot. She panicked when she couldn’t wake Anastasia. Jennifer shared a photo of the scary moment in an Instagram post that has since been deleted. In the photo, Anastasia’s skin is red and swollen. “THIS is clear proof a child doesn’t need to be in the sun to get heatstroke,” Jennifer wrote. >> Protect your kids from the heat First responders quickly arrived and discovered Anastasia’s blood sugar was dangerously low and her body temperature was at 104 degrees Fahrenheit, according to 'Today.' “They administered sucrose and in minutes she started crying, clearly scared,” Jennifer wrote. The temperature inside the room was around 122 degrees. >> Read more trending news “Hopefully other parents can take something from this & make sure you are checking the rooms in your house because they can be as dangerous as a hot car,” Jennifer wrote. She said she’s grateful for the first responders’ swift action to revive her daughter. “We definitely had god on our side yesterday,” Jennifer wrote.
  • There's a health warning about a chemical found in most sunscreens. A new study found that when that chemical comes into contact with sun and chlorine, it can become toxic. If you flip over your sunscreen, chances are avobenzone is first ingredient you'll find. In fact, Boston's WFXT went into a couple of drug stores and found the vast majority of the sunscreens on the shelves have this chemical listed as the active ingredient. Avobenzone is the active ingredient in most sunscreens as it protects against UV rays. >> The 14 most dangerous sunscreens for kids, according to experts “I have this one (because) I bought it just for my daughter, but I don't even know if it has it. Oh, avobenzone, there it is – first ingredient. And [the sunscreen is made] for babies, so that's not good,” said Candice Brown of Mattapan, Massachusetts. “It's an incredibly common ingredient in sunscreen,” said Dr. Abigail Waldman, Brigham and Women’s dermatologist. >> Here are the 19 best sunscreens for kids, according to experts But a new study first conducted in Moscow and published in the Chemosphere Journal, which is now being cited here in the United States, found that avobenzone can break down when exposed to a combination of light and chlorinated water, such as in a swimming pool, and it can degrade into some very harmful compounds, some of which are known to cause cancer. “Anytime you put on a sunscreen or a lotion, it can react with chlorine and byproducts can form, which are chlorinated byproducts that can potentially could be harmful and whether that's on your skin initially or it's floating in the pool and you get exposed, those are two main ways of having exposure,” Waldman said. >> Dermatologist sounds warning about social media fueled Coca-Cola tanning trend Waldman explained that the particular concern is ingesting it, such as “after swimming in a pool and putting your hand in your mouth or sucking your thumb,” she said. Waldman's advice is to keep kids' hands out of their mouths, towel or shower off immediately after pool time, and consider look for a sunscreen with zinc. Mothers told WFXT that they're going to make the switch. “So yeah, we gotta think about that,” Brown said. Waldman also said that despite all of this, people shouldn't stop using sunscreen altogether. >> Read more trending news She said using sunscreen, even with avobenzone, is better than using nothing at all because going without it can lead to skin cancer.
  • Throughout the holy month of Ramadan, observers fast from sunrise to sunset and partake in nightly feasts. >> Read more trending news Here are five things to know about Islam’s sacred month: What is Ramadan? Ramadan, the ninth month of the Islamic calendar, is the holy month of fasting, spiritual reflection and prayer for Muslims. It is believed to be the month in which the Prophet Muhammad revealed the holy book — Quran — to Muslims. The word “Ramadan” itself is taken from the Arabic word, “ramad,” an adjective describing something scorchingly dry or intensely heated by the sun. When is Ramadan? The Islamic calendar is based on the moon’s cycle and not the sun’s (what the Western world uses), so the dates vary year to year. By the Gregorian solar calendar, Ramadan is 10 to 12 days earlier every year. In 2018, Ramadan begins on May 15 and last through June 14. >> Read more trending news  To determine when exactly the holy month will begin, Muslim-majority countries look to local moon sighters, according to Al Jazeera. The lunar months last between 29 and 30 days, depending on the sighting of the moon on the 29th night of each month. If the moon is not visible, the month will last 30 days. What do Muslims do during Ramadan and why? Ramadan is known as the holy month of fasting, with Muslims abstaining from eating and drinking from sunrise to sunset. Fasting during the holiday is one of the Five Pillars of Islam, along with the daily prayer, declaration of faith, charity and performing the Hajj pilgrimage in Mecca, Saudi Arabia. In 2016, according to Al Jazeera, fasting hours around the globe ranged between 11 and 22 hours and in the US, 16 to 18 hours. The fast is intended to remind Muslims of the suffering of those less fortunate and bring believers closer to God (Allah, in Arabic).  During the month, Muslims also abstain from habits such as smoking, caffeine, sex and gossip; this is seen as a way to both physically and spiritually purify oneself while practicing self-restraint. Here’s what a day of fasting during Ramadan is like: Muslims have a predawn meal called the “suhoor.” Then, they fast all day until sunset. At sunset, Muslims break their fast with a sip of water and some dates, the way they believe the Prophet Muhammad broke his fast more than a thousand years ago. After sunset prayers, they gather at event halls, mosques or at home with family and friends in a large feast called “iftar.' How is the end of Ramadan celebrated? Toward the end of the month, Muslims celebrate Laylat al-Qadr or “the Night of Power/Destiny” — a day observers believe Allah sent the Angel Gabriel to the Prophet Muhammad to reveal the Quran’s first verses. On this night, which falls on one of the last 10 nights of Ramadan, Muslims practice intense worship as they pray for answers and seek forgiveness for any sins. To mark the end of Ramadan, determined by the sighting of the moon on the 29th, a 3-day celebration called Eid al-Fitr brings families and friends together in early morning prayers followed by picnics, feasts and fun. Does every Muslim fast during Ramadan? According to most interpreters of the Quran, children, the elderly, the ill, pregnant women, women who are nursing or menstruating, and travelers are exempt from fasting. Some interpreters also consider intense hunger and thirst as well as compulsion (someone threatening another to do something) exceptions. But as an entirety, whether Muslims fast or not often depends on their ethnicity and country. Many Muslims in Muslim-majority countries, for example, observe the monthlong fast during Ramadan, according to 2012 data from the Pew Research Center. In fact, in Saudi Arabia, Muslims and non-Muslims can be fined or jailed for eating in public during the day, according to the Associated Press. But in the United States and in Europe, many Muslims are accepting of non-observers.
  • A video of a San Antonio teen's heartwarming surprise for her prom date – and his emotional reaction – has gone viral. >> Watch the clip here >> Stranger's act of kindness for mom, 2 kids on plane goes viral According to KSAT, Health Careers High School senior Morgan Coultress, 18, has had conversion disorder, which affects the use of her legs, since she underwent surgery in June. She said she couldn't walk unassisted for 10 months, the station reported. >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news  So Coultress prepared a special surprise for her prom date, Tarik Garcia.  On Saturday, a camera captured the moment that Garcia walked into Coultress' home – and the shocked look on his face as Coultress took several steps toward him. >> Read more trending news  The clip, which Coultress shared on Twitter, has been viewed more than 13 million times. Coultress, who was crowned prom queen that same evening, said she hopes to walk at her graduation next month, KSAT reported. Read more here.
  • Six Flags Over Georgia now has the option to let patrons more freely walk around with adult beverages. You still must be 21 to ride aboard the booze train. >> Read more trending news Cobb County commissioners voted on March 27 to modify rules that before restricted drinks to the patios of certain spots, like JB’s Sports Bar And Grill. Six Flags spokesman Gene Petriello said the Austell amusement park had requested the change. However, Petriello said that even though the park has the option, it has not changed its policy. So, unless that changes, folks still have to keep their drinks on patios. He said he didn’t know of any plan to let drinkers take libations mobile. “We are pleased the Cobb County Commissioners approved our request to modify our existing alcohol license and we will continue to offer this service with the proper controls and regulations,” the park said in its official comment.
  • A Seattle Girl Scout troop is ending the cookie season on a sweet note. KIRO-TV's Siemny Kim shows us how their cookies inspired strangers to pay it forward. The annual cookie sale gives Girl Scouts a lesson in business. >> Donald Glover meets Girl Scout who sang ‘Redbone,’ buys 113 boxes of cookies For this troop, it's also given them a lesson in kindness. “At first, I was really surprised. I didn’t know what to do,” Girl Scout Norah Wall said.  Norah Wall and Ruthie Bridgman had set up outside of a Grocery Outlet store in Seattle's Madrona neighborhood when a good Samaritan approached their booth. >> Dunkin' Donuts introducing Girl Scout Cookie-flavored coffees “I remember this lady coming up and she was like, ‘Hey, if I buy all these cookies, will you hand them out to everyone that comes out of the store?’” Ruthie said. “And we were like, ‘Yeah, I guess.’” The woman spent more than $600. Norah and Ruthie even had a hard time giving the cookies away. “Some people just didn't believe that somebody would actually do that,” Norah said.  Incredibly, that random act of kindness didn't end there. It made its way inside the Grocery Outlet, where Cami Nearhoff is a cashier. “We had a lady in my line – people in front, people in back – and she bought all of their groceries,” Nearhoff said. >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news  Nearhoff said people paid it forward all day. “All day it just seemed like people were doing little things. So I think it kind of inspired people to give back to each other. Whether it was a dollar, someone was short 6 cents – all day long it was happening. It was just crazy. Really crazy day,” Nearhoff said. >> Read more trending news  This troop is excited knowing their cookies could inspire such kindness.  “I think it's really cool, and it made me so happy that I was able to be a part of this,” Ruthie said. The troop is raising money to attend Girl Scout camp this year. If you're still looking for the sweet treats, you'd better hurry. Sunday is the last day of cookie sales.
  • Malcolm and Betty Clynch never did anything apart, their family said. That proved to be true even in death. The Texas couple married in 1945 when they were teenagers, WFAA reported. But soon the newlyweds were separated for the only time in their lives, while Malcolm served in the Army. Love letters shared by the family illustrate the couple's deep love and devotion to one another. Malcolm signed each love letter with: 'I'll always love only you.' >> Read more trending news  That love continued for the rest of their lives, as they raised a family and had long careers. After 72 years of marriage, Malcolm and Betty, both 90, were in failing health. Betty had Alzheimer's disease and Malcolm had heart issues, the family told WFAA. The family believes that Malcolm felt like he had to die first, to show Betty the way. Malcolm did die first, at a Fort Worth assisted living facility. Betty followed him in death just 10 hours later, family told WFAA. The family held a double funeral for the couple on Monday.
  • Woody Parker and his wife, Genie, arrived at Fernandina Beach in style. Woody has glaucoma, an eye disease that causes blindness, and he’s on the verge of losing the sight he has left. Wish of a Lifetime and Brookdale Senior Living decided to help make Woody’s dream come true before he goes blind, ActionNewsJax reported. >> Read more trending news  He wanted to see the beach with his wife one last time. “I love it. I love the beach,” Woody said. He and his wife made their way down closer to the water. “There’s nothing like the sound of the beach with the waves crashing,” said Woody. “Always special to be anywhere with him, especially here. We enjoy it,” Genie said. Hand in hand, they relaxed on the beach. “It’s just real cozy. There’s just something about it that’s just different,” Woody told ActionNewsJax. Woody says even though he may lose his sight, it won’t stop him from coming to the beach if he has another chance. “Of course, I won’t be able to see the changes, but I’ll be able to feel them,” he said.
  • A day on the water in Amelia Island, Florida, turned into a once-in-a-lifetime experience for a group of fishermen. >> Click here to watch the news report Capt. Tony Peeples with Southern Style Charters said he and a group of four men were off the coast of Fernandina Beach north of the jetties when they came within feet of a 14-foot white shark. Peeples said he was leaning over the side of the boat with his hands in the water when one man said, 'I got a shark.' “I just got through bending over on that side of the boat releasing a fish,” Peeples said. “I kind of stood up and looked and said, ‘No it ain’t … Yeah it is.’” Peeples said the shark came out from under the boat and ate half of a 50-pound drum – in one bite. >> Read more trending news  He said the shark got hooked after it went around the back of the boat and ate the other half of the drum. “The guy that had him on the rod ... the look on his face when he seen a great white shark, it was just like awe,” Peeples said. “His eyes were all lit up.” Chris Fischer with OCEARCH told WJAX that white sharks commonly spend the winter months off the Florida coast and move north in April or May. Hilton, a 12 1/2-foot white shark tagged by OCEARCH, pinged off the coast of Ponte Vedra Beach on Thursday. Fischer said the sharks are good for the ocean because they strengthen fish populations by eating weak or dying fish. “Seeing a great white shark is a once-in-a-lifetime (event) for most,” Peebles said, adding that in his 30 years as a charter boat captain, he’s never seen a white shark so big. “It’s kind of a humbling experience when you look down and see something that big three feet from you,” he said.