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    A pocket-sized pocket shark found in the Gulf of Mexico has turned out to be a new species. And the mysterious pouches that it's named for, up near its front fins? Scientists say they squirt little glowing clouds into the ocean. Researchers from around the Gulf and in New York have named the species the American pocket shark, or Mollisquama (mah-lihs-KWAH-muh) mississippiensis (MISS-ih-sip-ee-EHN-sis). It's only the third out of more than 500 known shark species that may squirt luminous liquid, said R. Dean Grubbs, a Florida State University scientist who was not involved in the research. He said the other two are the previously known pocket shark and the taillight shark , which has a similar gland near its tail. 'You have this tiny little bulbous luminescent shark cruising around in the world's oceans and we know nothing about them,' said Grubbs, the immediate past president of the American Elasmobranch Society — scientists who study sharks, skates and rays. 'It shows us how little we actually know.' Like the only other pocket shark known to science — a 16-inch (400-millimeter) adult female found in the Pacific Ocean off Peru — this 5.6-inch (142-millimeter) newborn male fished out of the Gulf has a pouch next to each front fin. But with this one, scientists figured out what they're for. The muscular glands are lined with pigment-covered fluorescent projections, indicating they squirt luminous liquid, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration ichthyologist Mark Grace and his collaborators wrote in the journal 'Zootaxa.' The shark also has clusters of light-emitting cells dotted on its belly. That makes it likely the one caught in 1979 and now in a Russian museum was also a light-squirter with a bioluminescent abdomen, though four decades pickled in formaldehyde probably have made it impossible to tell, Grace said Friday. The luminescence might conceal the shark from prey or from predators, he said. Differences between the two specimens include a possible pressure-sensitive organ that the new species could use to detect motion hundreds of feet away and some differences in the teeth, the scientists wrote. The new species may also have as many as 10 fewer vertebrae than the other one, called Mollisquama parini. Grace, who is based in Pascagoula, Mississippi, said the baby shark was among specimens collected during a 2010 survey to find out what Gulf of Mexico sperm whales eat by trawling in an area and at a depth where tagged whales had been feeding. He had spent three years identifying the collected specimens, and this one, still showing an umbilical scar, was in the last bag he opened. 'I've been in science about 40 years. ... I can usually make a pretty good guess' about a marine animal's identity, he said. 'I couldn't with this one.' Grace said it took a while to convince himself that he had something unusual: 'I figured I was doing something wrong.' He called Tulane University scientists saying, 'Look, I've got some really unusual deep-water stuff I want to archive in your collection , including a shark I can't identify.' Scientists at the American Museum of Natural History in New York and the University of Florida's Florida Museum of Natural History also became collaborators. A 2015 paper identified the shark as the second of its kind. It took years more, including high-resolution scans in the particle accelerator in Grenoble, France, to get more internal detail, to be sure it was a new species. Another European expert, Julien Claes, did cellular dissection of a bit of the pocket tissue to confirm its function. 'He said, 'Yes, these are the kind of cells that produce luminous fluid.' So it's pretty safe to say that's what the one in Russia does,' Grace said. The collaborations were exciting, he said. 'I don't get over it,' he said. 'I just remind myself this is one of the great parts of science, to have collaborations like that.
  • The Wall Street Journal says Equifax will pay around $700 million to settle with the Federal Trade Commission over a 2017 data breach that exposed Social Security numbers and other private information of nearly 150 million people. The Journal, citing unnamed sources familiar with the matter, said the settlement could be announced as soon as Monday. Equifax declined to comment. The report says the deal would resolve investigations by the FTC, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and most state attorneys general. It would also resolve a nationwide consumer class-action lawsuit. Spokesmen for the FTC and the CFPB didn't immediately return messages seeking comment Friday night. The breach was one of the largest affecting people's private information. Atlanta-based Equifax did not notice the attack for more than six weeks. The compromised data included Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, driver license numbers and credit card numbers. The company said earlier this year that it had set aside around $700 million to cover anticipated settlements and fines.
  • About a third of New York City's subway lines were suspended for more than an hour during a busy, hot Friday evening commute, stranding some passengers underground and sending others searching for other ways home. The stoppage affected the No. 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 trains that serve swaths of Manhattan, the Bronx and Brooklyn. It also halted the S shuttle train that links Grand Central Terminal and Times Square — two of the city's busiest stations. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority warned that there would still be 'extensive delays' in the system, which serves more than 5 million people per day, even after service began to resume Friday night. It blamed the suspension on a network communications problem. The temperature was still 91 degrees Fahrenheit (33 degrees Celsius) on Friday evening when the stoppage happened, though meteorologists estimated that it felt like 100 degrees, leaving riders sweating in stopped trains with doors closed. The breakdown came as the city gears up for scorching temperatures throughout the weekend. MTA officials were not able to immediately determine the cause of the breakdown, which started at about 6 p.m. The state agency that runs the city's subway system urged passengers to remain in train cars while crews work as quickly as possible to bring people into stations. At the World Trade Center No. 1 line station, a clerk issued refund tickets and directed people to other nearby lines. Passengers — many of them visitors to New York — seemed to take the developments in stride. 'It's about what I expected,' said Derek Lloyd, who's from Hanover, Massachusetts, near Boston and its transit system. 'I don't know that ours is much better,' he said with a smile. On one line that was running, passengers packed into one car that didn't appear to have air conditioning. Sweat glistened on riders' skin as they sought relief, fanning themselves and one another. One woman noted, 'This is dangerous.' It was the second time in the past week that New York subway riders got stuck underground. Last Saturday, a power outage that stretched across 30 Manhattan blocks from the Upper West Side to Times Square left passengers stranded till trains were manually moved into stations and doors opened. The outage was blamed on a system that failed to isolate a faulty distribution cable.
  • Recent seizures and attacks aimed at oil tankers in the Strait of Hormuz will raise insurance rates for shipping companies and, if unchecked, reduce tanker traffic in the vital waterway, according to energy experts. Britain's foreign secretary said Iranian authorities on Friday seized two ships, one flying under the British flag, the other registered in Liberia. The events occurred in a passageway that carries one-fifth of the world's crude exports. 'If this kind of problem continues, you might see people start to shy away from the (Persian) Gulf or try to reflag — not be a British tanker,' said energy economist Michael Lynch. The near-term impact will fall most heavily on the shipping industry in the form of higher insurance rates, said Lynch, president of Strategic Energy & Economic Research Inc. Richard Nephew, a Columbia University researcher who wrote a book on sanctions, also believes the tanker seizures could create 'a real risk premium' for companies that operate in the Gulf and insurers that underwrite them. 'Certainly we've seen concern with this in the past on sanctions grounds, and I would imagine security groups would be a far more complicating element,' Nephew said. On Friday, Iran's Revolutionary Guard said it took the British tanker Stena Impero to an Iranian port because it allegedly violated international shipping regulations. An Iranian news agency said the Liberian-flagged Mesdar was briefly detained and then released after being told to comply with environmental rules. The seizures marked a sharp escalation of tension in the region that began rising when the Trump administration withdrew from a 2015 nuclear deal with Iran and imposed severe restrictions on Iranian oil exports and other sanctions. Many of the 2,000 companies operating ships in the region have ordered their vessels to transit the Strait of Hormuz only during the daylight hours and at high speed. But only a handful of the companies have halted bookings. The tensions in the Gulf also pushed oil prices slightly higher. Brent crude, the international standard, rose 0.9% to $62.47 a barrel on Friday, while benchmark U.S. crude gained 0.6% to settle at $55.63. There's a long history of shippers enduring threats in the region. 'There have always been little problems around the Gulf where people will say, 'You're in our territorial waters,' but usually that doesn't go so far as the seizure of tankers,' Lynch said.
  • Joe Biden's son Hunter made his 2020 presidential campaign trail debut with his father Friday, two weeks after the former vice president praised him for battling through 'tough times,' including years of drug and alcohol abuse. The younger Biden's appearance at a fundraiser in Southern California on Friday was a sign the former vice president and his campaign see him as an asset to the campaign despite a series of personal problems that had kept him in the background. Hunter Biden, 49, attended the event with his new wife, Melissa Cohen, and his daughter Finnegan at the home of Pasadena City Councilmember John Kennedy. A campaign adviser confirmed it was Hunter Biden's first appearance for his father's 2020 campaign. A lengthy New Yorker profile published this month detailed Hunter Biden's yearslong fight with drug and alcohol abuse. Joe Biden said a week later in a CNN interview that 'Hunter is my heart' and that 'He's fighting. He's never given up.' Hunter Biden stood in a corner of Kennedy's home behind his father as Joe Biden began speaking to several dozen donors packed into a front room. After thanking the hosts and other notables, he began his remarks before interrupting himself to introduce his son. 'I didn't introduce my son, Hunter Biden, and my granddaughter are here,' he said. Finnegan had attended a California fundraiser a day earlier with her grandfather, as well as a campaign event in Iowa on Monday. Hunter Biden mingled briefly after largely staying in the background, though Kennedy drew more attention to him when he insisted that the younger Biden and his wife come to the front of the room. 'Yes, Joe is all the attention, but it's family. Hunter is part of the family, you're part of the Biden family,' Kennedy said, gesturing to Hunter Biden's wife, whom he married in May. 'Let's take this Biden family and take them all to the White House.' ___ Beaumont reported from Des Moines, Iowa.
  • The Latest on a California Supreme Court ruling on defense lawyer access to private social media postings (all times local): 4:30 p.m. Facebook says it's deciding how to respond to a California Supreme Court ruling that says defense lawyers in a gang-related murder trial can obtain private social media postings. The Los Angeles Times says the court on Wednesday lifted a stay that had halted a ruling by the judge overseeing the San Francisco trial requiring Facebook and other social media companies to hand over some postings. That ruling remains under appeal. However, If the ruling is upheld and Facebook refuses to hand over postings, it might be held in contempt of court. In a statement, Facebook says it believes federal law prohibits any lower-court order requiring it to turn over private Facebook and Instagram content. The company says it will 'continue to protect' user privacy. ___ 8:17 p.m. The California Supreme Court has ruled that the defense in a gang-related murder trial can obtain private postings from social media companies. The Los Angeles Times reports the court's decision Wednesday upheld a ruling by the judge overseeing the San Francisco trial and noted that the judge's findings strongly justify access in this case. The Times says it's the first time such an order has been enforced in a California court. Last year, the California Supreme Court had ruled that the defense in the gang case could have social media postings that were public at the time of the killings, but that ruling did not deal with private postings. Under the latest ruling, the judge will decide which postings obtained from social media companies will be given to the defense. ___ Information from: Los Angeles Times, http://www.latimes.com/
  • Two executives of a Salt Lake City biodiesel company linked to a polygamous group have pleaded guilty to charges filed in what prosecutors have called a $511 million tax credit scheme, according to documents made public Friday. Washakie Renewable Energy once described itself as the largest producer of clean burning and sustainable biodiesel in Utah, but prosecutors said the company was actually creating fake production records to get renewable-fuel tax credits, then laundering the proceeds from 2010 through 2016. Prosecutors plan to seize items including a $3.6 million home in Huntington Beach, California, as well as a Bugatti and Lamborghini as a result of the pleas. Company CEO Jacob Kingston pleaded guilty Thursday to more than three dozen counts, including mail fraud, money laundering and obstruction of justice. His brother and company CFO Isaiah Kingston pleaded guilty to more than a dozen similar counts. Prosecutors have said both men are members of the northern Utah-based Davis County Cooperative Society, also known as the Kingston Group, which practices polygamy and owns hundreds of businesses. Group leaders have condemned fraudulent business practices. The money was used to buy houses and property in Turkey and Belize as well as Utah and Arizona, according to plea documents. Among the homes set to be seized is an upscale six-bedroom house in a Salt Lake City suburb owned by Jacob Kingston that is valued at $4 million, according to county property records. Another home is the multimillion-dollar luxury waterfront property in California. Prosecutors are also seizing other cars and cash. The mother of the two men, Rachael Kingston, also pleaded guilty Thursday to charges including mail fraud and money laundering, as did Jacob Kingston's wife Sally. They are accused of helping the men rotate the same fuel between tanks in Texas, Louisiana and Panama to create the false appearance of buying biodiesel, then helping them launder the money and purge records. Defense attorneys for all four members of the Kingston family did not immediately return messages seeking comment, or declined to comment. Jacob Kingston also had an unidentified contact who tipped him off ahead of a federal raid 2016, allowing the brothers to remove their hard drives from their computers and one belonging to their mother, according to plea documents. A fifth person charged in the case, California businessman Lev Aslan Dermen, has pleaded not guilty to charges including mail fraud and money laundering. That hasn't changed, his lawyer Mark Geragos said. __ Associated Press writers Morgan Smith and Brady McCombs contributed to this story.
  • Keith Thurman certainly seems like more than the modern Manny Pacquiao should be able to handle. Thurman (29-0, 22 KOs) is a decade younger, certainly more powerful and maybe even a bit faster than his famously speedy opponent. Thurman is a tough, voluble welterweight champion in his prime competitive years, and Pacquiao represents the biggest fight of his career — a once-in-a-lifetime chance to pound a boxing great into retirement. 'It's been a build up and a progression my whole career toward this moment on Saturday night,' Thurman said. 'This really is the outcome of an individual living out their dream.' So why are the 40-year-old Pacquiao (61-7-2, 39 KOs) and trainer Freddie Roach so confident heading into the MGM Grand Garden in Las Vegas? And why is the older eight-division champion actually a slight betting favorite against one of the best 147-pounders in the world? After 18 years together, Pacquiao and Roach believe Thurman is just another challenge to be overcome by hard work, smart planning and the psychological edge of experience. Thurman looks daunting on paper, but Pacquiao and Roach are virtuosos on canvas. 'Tomorrow night, class is in session,' Pacquiao said Friday after the weigh-in. 'I hope Keith Thurman studied hard, because Professor Pacquiao gives very hard tests.' Pacquiao and Thurman both hold versions of the WBA 147-pound title heading into this Fox Sports pay-per-view showdown. In Roach's educated mind, the vaunted Thurman has far more questions to answer than Pacquiao, who is coming into this fight off back-to-back victories over Lucas Matthysse and Adrien Broner. Can Thurman recapture his prime fighting form after two years of relative inactivity caused by a 22-month injury layoff? Can he match Pacquiao's legendary speed while showing the stamina to fight effectively for 12 rounds against Manny's famed pace? 'I hope Thurman brings his best, because that's when Manny will be at his best,' Roach said. 'Thurman is a good fighter, but Manny beats good fighters all the time. And I don't think Keith Thurman is a great fighter. I think Broner is a better fighter, and Manny took care of him (easily).' While Thurman is in the biggest bout of his career, the Filipino senator's late-career resurgence also reaches a vital point Saturday. Despite what Roach says, Thurman seems certain to be a big step up in competition from Matthysse and Broner, and the cumulative effects of a boxing career rarely wear well after 40. 'Manny isn't going to do anything with those little T-Rex arms,' Thurman said. 'He's about to get beat up. I get to punch a senator in the face, and he's going to feel it.' Thurman earned the nickname 'One Time' with his one-punch knockout power, yet he has stopped just one of his seven opponents since December 2013. And though Thurman is still in his ostensible prime, he has shown a few signs of weariness with his sport. He has never looked more vulnerable as a professional than he did in his comeback victory last January over tough veteran Josesito Lopez, who rocked Thurman repeatedly and even won a 10-8 round without a knockdown. More recently, Thurman has repeatedly spoken about how he's eager to get a few big paydays and then get out of boxing — a sensible mentality that nonetheless could indicate a fighter's focus isn't completely on competition anymore. Thurman has been totally focused in public appearances for this big-money bout, however. 'I'm going to do to Manny Pacquiao what he did to Oscar De La Hoya,' Thurman said, referring to Pacquiao's landmark victory over the Golden Boy in 2008. While Thurman would love to retire his opponent, Pacquiao plans to keep competing indefinitely, and he doesn't dismiss the notion of fighting to 50 and beyond, as Bernard Hopkins did. He has openly looked beyond Thurman to his hopes of a second fight with the retired Floyd Mayweather, or a unification bout with champion Errol Spence. But just in case anybody believes he isn't focused on Thurman, Pacquiao said that even his mother took offense at Thurman's pre-fight trash talk , including his vow to 'crucify' the vocally evangelical Pacquiao. 'I'm just always smiling, no matter what Keith says,' Pacquiao said. 'It's easy to say things, but it's not easy to do it in the ring. I've been in this sport longer than Keith Thurman, so my experience will be the difference.' ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/tag/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • President Donald Trump will be attending a fundraiser in Wheeling, West Virginia, on Wednesday, the day special counsel Robert Mueller testifies before the House Judiciary Committee. The president told reporters Friday he would not be watching Mueller's testimony and noted that an impeachment resolution was handily defeated in the House this week. He says the vote was a 'massive victory' and at some point, Democrats have to 'stop playing games.' The Intelligencer-Wheeling News Register says invitations to the fundraiser indicate that state leaders in both West Virginia and Ohio will be in attendance. The event is being hosted by Robert E. Murray, president and CEO of Murray Energy. A White House official confirms that Trump will be in Wheeling that day.
  • With Iranian military threats in mind, the United States is sending American forces, including fighter aircraft, air defense missiles and likely more than 500 troops, to a Saudi air base that became a hub of American air power in the Middle East in the 1990s but was abandoned by Washington after it toppled Iraqi strongman Saddam Hussein in 2003. The Saudi Foreign Ministry announced the basing agreement Friday without mentioning details. Senior American defense officials said some U.S. troops and Patriot air defense missile systems have already arrived at Prince Sultan Air Base, south of Riyadh, where the troops have been preparing for the arrival of aircraft later this summer as well as additional troops. The officials spoke on condition of anonymity in order to provide details not publicly announced. The agreement has been in the works for many weeks and is not a response specifically to Friday's seizure by Iran of a British tanker in the Persian Gulf. Tensions with Iran have spiked since May when the Trump administration said it had detected increased Iranian preparations for possible attacks on U.S. forces and interests in the Gulf area. In a written statement Friday evening, U.S. Central Command said the deployments to Saudi Arabia had been approved by the Pentagon. 'This movement of forces provides an additional deterrent, and ensures our ability to defend our forces and interests in the region from emergent, credible threats,' Central Command said. 'This movement creates improvement of operational depth and logistical networks. U.S. Central Command continually assesses force posture in the region and is working with Kingdom of Saudi Arabia authorities to base U.S. assets at the appropriate locations.' Putting U.S. combat forces back in Saudi Arabia, after an absence of more than a decade, adds depth to the regional alignment of U.S. military power, which is mostly in locations on the Persian Gulf that are more vulnerable to Iranian missile attack. But it also introduces a political and diplomatic complication for the Trump administration, accused by critics of coddling the Saudis even after the murder last fall of dissident writer Jamal Khashoggi by Saudi agents. Many in Congress now question the decades-old U.S.-Saudi security alliance and oppose major new arms sales to the kingdom. Starting with the January 1991 air war against Iraq after its invasion of Kuwait the previous summer, the U.S. flew a wide range of aircraft from Prince Sultan air base, originally known as al-Kharj. Supported by an all-American array of creature comforts like fast-food restaurants and swimming pools, U.S. forces there flew and maintained Air Force fighters and other warplanes. The base also served as a launch pad for the December 1998 bombing of Iraq, code-named Operation Desert Fox, which targeted sites believed to be associated with Iraq's nuclear and missile programs. In 2001, the base became home to the U.S. military's main air control organization, known as the Combined Air Operations Center, which orchestrated the air war in Afghanistan until it was relocated in 2003 to al-Udeid air base in Qatar.