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    Mikaela Shiffrin won a women’s World Cup super-G Sunday for her second triumph in a speed event in three days. The three-time overall champion from the United States used her outstanding giant slalom skills to navigate the many sharp turns on the Marc Girardelli course and beat another technical specialist, Italy’s Marta Bassino, by 0.29 seconds. Shiffrin was about three tenths ahead of Bassino’s time from the first split and the margin hardly changed throughout her run. It was Shiffrin’s first win in the discipline since clinching the super-G world title in February, and she went top of the season standings. Sunday’s result came two days after the American won a downhill on the same hill. It marked the first time in Shiffrin's career that she won two speed events in the same weekend. Former overall champion Lara Gut-Behrami of Switzerland was 0.70 behind in third for her first podium result of the season. One of Shiffrin’s main rivals for the overall title, Federica Brignone, was leading by 0.08 at the final split time but the Italian lost her balance as she hooked a gate and slid off the course. Viktoria Rebensburg, who led the discipline standings going into the race, finished outside the top 10, while the winner of the previous super-G, Sofia Goggia, skipped the race to rest her bruised right ankle following the Italian’s crash in Friday’s downhill. With two wins and Saturday’s fourth place in another downhill, Shiffrin left the Bulgarian resort with 250 points, extending her lead in the overall standings to 370 points over Brignone and 395 over Slovakia’s Petra Vlhova, who finished Sunday’s race in sixth. The victory was Shiffrin’s 66th career win, leaving her one short of Marcel Hirscher’s tally. The Austrian record eight-time overall champion, who retired in the off-season, is third on the all-time winners list, behind Ingemar Stenmark (86) and Lindsey Vonn (82). The women’s World Cup travels to the 2014 Olympic venue in Rosa Khutor for a downhill and super-G next weekend. ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • For Marija Frlan it's as symbolic as it can get: A survivor of a Nazi concentration camp during World War II, the Slovenian woman turns 100 years old on Monday, the international Holocaust Remembrance Day. Frlan, who was held at the Nazi's Ravensbruck camp in northern Germany for over a year in 1944-45, will join other survivors and officials in Poland on Monday for ceremonies marking the 75th anniversary of the liberation of the Auschwitz death camp. Ahead of the ceremonies, Frlan told The Associated Press that one could talk at length about what it was like in the Ravensbruck camp, but that only those who were there really know how horrific it was. “The ones who didn’t survive this, they can’t understand, no,' the energetic woman said at her home in the small village of Rakek in southwestern Slovenia. “It was terrible.' Frlan said prisoners at the Nazi camp for women were given just enough food to survive and had to work throughout the day. Obligatory inspections were held outside every morning, lasting for at least one hour. “One time, the inspection was going on for four hours,' she recalled. “It was a rainy day. It is impossible to explain if you weren't there.' Women at the camp encouraged each other not to give up, telling one another “Girls, hold on!' and “No moaning!' she recalled. The Ravensbruck concentration camp was the second in size only to the women's camp in Auschwitz, according to the U.S. Holocaust Museum. Toward the end of the war, some 50,000 prisoners, mostly women, were held at the camp. Frlan was shipped to Ravensbruck in March 1944 from a prison in her native Slovenia. After having to clean the the offices of the secret Gestapo police for nine months, Frlan was jailed for helping the resistance movement in Slovenia in a bombing. “The Gestapo knew that I was responsible for the bombs,' she said. “So they took me to prison.' It was then that she saw her husband for the last time. He was captured too and executed soon after. “We even couldn’t say hello,' she said. “That was it.' Frlan was sent to Ravensbruck on train via Munich with a group of other prisoners. The only meal she had in five days was a bowl of soup and three loaves of bread. The inmates at Raversbruck came from some 30 countries, with the biggest number from Poland. Soviet troops liberated the camp in April 1945. With the Red Army troops approaching, the Germans forced the prisoners to walk out of the camp toward the front lines, Frlan said. The march continued until early May. “Suddenly, there were no Germans anymore and a Russian soldier appeared on a horse,' she remembered. “He said: The war is over!' The prisoners from Slovenia and other nations in the former Yugoslavia then decided to walk back home together, Frlan said. Once she was back in Slovenia, the despair hit again. “I had lost my husband, I had no flat,' she said. “Nothing.' Still, Frlan managed to get back on her feet. She married again and had a family, giving birth to six children. She worked as a cleaner and factory worker after the war and even climbed Slovenia's highest Alpine peak of Triglav at the age of 70. Her family — Frlan has survived her second husband and three of her children — is planning a big birthday party in the village once she returns from Poland. Still generally healthy and able to walk on her own, Frlan always keeps a magnifying glass close by because of poor eyesight. So what is her recipe for longevity? “I always worked hard,' she said.
  • The German military resumed training Iraqi troops in the country's Kurdish north on Sunday, about three weeks after it was suspended following the U.S. killing of a top Iranian general in Baghdad. The military said the commander of the international operation fighting the Islamic State group lifted the suspension. Germany resumed training in Irbil on Sunday morning together with its partners. The Bundeswehr has about 90 soldiers in Irbil. However, Germany's training mission in central Iraq is still suspended and there was no immediate word on whether or when it might resume. Germany flew 35 soldiers out of Iraq from bases in Taji and Baghdad on Jan. 7, most of them to neighboring Jordan. That was described as a temporary measure. The decision was made after the Jan. 3 killing by the United States of Iranian Revolutionary Guard commander Qassem Soleimani drastically raised regional tensions and escalated a crisis between Washington and Tehran.
  • Philippine authorities on Sunday lowered the alert level at Taal Volcano, two weeks after it began spewing ash, steam and rocks, a move that will allow many of the more than 376,000 displaced villagers to return home. A popular tourist destination just south of Manila because of its picturesque setting in the middle of a lake, Taal erupted on Jan. 12. It caused no known deaths but delivered an early crisis this year for one of the world’s most disaster-prone nations. “Taal volcano’s condition in the two weeks ... has generally declined into less frequent volcanic earthquake activity, decelerated ground deformation ... and weak steam and gas emissions at the main crater,” the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology said. The government’s agency lowered the alert level from 4 to 3, which means there’s a “decreased tendency toward a hazardous eruption.” The highest level-5 alert indicates a major and much more dangerous eruption. The agency also reduced to half the danger zone where residents have to be evacuated, from the 14-kilometer (8.7-mile) radius around the volcano. Taal had last erupted 43 years ago. “We have to be careful of Taal because of the danger it may still bring, so at the lower level, there should be heightened preparedness. People should brace for rapid evacuation,” Renato Solidum, the head of the institute, said in a televised news conference. Mayor Daniel Reyes of Agoncillo, a town along the western shores of Taal Lake overlooking the island where the volcano lies, said he was relieved but remained concerned. Residents of Agoncillo and nearby Laurel could still not return home because of the towns’ proximity to the volcano. Thousands of villagers who used to reside and work on Volcano Island will not be allowed to return permanently, Batangas Gov. Hermilando Mandanas said. Mandanas warned returning villagers to assess the safety of their villages and houses, many of which remained blanketed by volcanic ash or had been damaged by the eruption and earthquakes. “It’s somehow a relief but we’re still under a total lockdown,” Reyes told The Associated Press, adding all the 44,000 villagers of his town will remain in evacuation centers. Footage showed thousands of elated villagers yelling “thank you' as they drove back in droves to their still-dusty towns and cities on board motorcycles, motorcycle taxis and some cars. More than 376,000 people fled to safety from ash-blanketed towns and cities in hard-hit Batangas province. Nearly half of them sought accommodation in some 500 state-run emergency shelters, mostly school and government buildings. The eruption had shut Manila’s main international airport for a night due to volcanic ash, forcing the cancellation of hundreds of flights. A thriving tourism industry in Batangas and in upland Tagaytay city, where hundreds of hotels, venues, spas and parks have benefited from its vantage view of one of the world’s smallest volcanoes, came to a halt for days. Resort towns around Taal Lake resembled ash-covered ghost towns. Police set up barricades and checkpoints to prevent residents from sneaking back to the danger zone to check their homes, rescue pets or retrieve food, documents and belongings, sparking arguments. The 1,020-foot (311-meter) Taal is the second-most restive of about two dozen active Philippine volcanoes and precariously lies near densely populated areas. On the small island where the volcano lies, more than 5,000 villagers, many of them working as tourist guides, fled as the ground shook and the volcano belched a tall plume of dark-gray ash and steam into the sky. Hundreds of horses, cows and other animals were left behind. The Philippine archipelago lies in the so-called Pacific “Ring of Fire,” a seismically fragile region around the ocean basin, where most of the world’s earthquakes and volcanic eruptions occur.
  • Right-wing opposition leader Matteo Salvini is telling Italians who are voting in two regions to use their ballots to help his anti-migrant party return to national power. Voting began Sunday morning in Emilia-Romagna, a northern region where the left-wing has held power for decades, and in Calabria, in the south, an area Salvini's League party once disparaged as unproductive but where it now wants to expand a foothold. Results, expected early Monday, of the voting for governor and regional legislatures could rock Italy's squabbling central government in Rome. Salvini is demanding an early election to end Premier Giuseppe Conte's coalition government, whose junior partner is the center-left Democrats. Left-wing forces have ruled Emilia-Romagna for decades and a loss there could weaken the Democratic Party's leverage in Conte's government. The senior party in Conte's government is the populist 5-Star Movement, which has been plagued by infighting and defections. Salvini in a Facebook post told Italians as they headed to vote to “liberate these splendid regions” from the Democrats and then “let's free the entire country.” Salvini, who in Conte's previous government took a hard line against immigration, lost his job and his right-wing party lost its place in government last year when the League leader yanked his support in a failed bid for an early election. Conte then formed a government with the Democrats.
  • Ons Jabeur is the first Arab woman to make it to a Grand Slam singles quarterfinal, and she's proud to lead the way. “I'm trying to inspire many young generations back home either in Tunisia or the Arabic world, especially in Africa, which is amazing,' she said. “I've been practicing in Tunisia from the age of 3.' She added, smiling: 'I'm a 100% Tunisian product.' The 78th-ranked Jabeur beat 27th-ranked Wang Qiang, who upset 23-time major winner Serena Williams in the previous round, 7-6 (4), 6-1 on Sunday. The 25-year-old Jabeur will play American Sofia Kenin on Tuesday in the final eight.Jabeur said she had plenty of scholarship offers to go to college in the U.S., but 'I wanted to really go pro directly.' She attended tennis academies in Belgium and France but she decided that returning to Tunisia was a 'good option.' A French Open junior champion in 2011, Jabeur expected quick success on on the elite tour. 'It was a little bit frustrating just after the juniors because I was expecting to go better,' she said. 'So many players I played with in juniors, I see them, they're like top 50, top 20.' She's on her way up the rankings now, after making the last eight in the season's first major. She's gaining attention with each match in Australia, and keeping her family awake. “I called my mom right away, she was really, really happy,' Jabeur said of her win over Wang. 'My father as well, I think he was crying. Also my two brothers, the one in Germany and the one in France. The family, everyone was behind me. They couldn't go back to sleep again. “I'm happy that I have this support because we've been through rough times — now it's finally paying off.” ___ DJOKOVIC'S FAMILY FAVORITE? Novak Djokovic is one of Serbia's favorite sons. But is he his son's favorite player? Apparently, it's still up for debate. Djokovic has has won 16 major titles, including a record seven in Australia, and is into the quarterfinals of a major for the 46th time — second only to Roger Federer. He recently pulled tens of thousands of Serbian fans to stadiums in Brisbane and Sydney as he helped his country win the inaugural ATP Cup team tournament. His 5-year-old Stefan has started playing tennis — he also likes martial arts and football — and father and son practice together sometimes. Asked about Stefan's tennis development, Djokovic said: “He likes to play with me, and with his best friend. He doesn't like to play with too many other people.” Asked who Stefan's favorite is, not even the 32-year-old Djokovic was sure. “He still hasn't expressed who his favorite player is. I hope I'll be working on becoming his favorite player.' ___ ON COURT Margaret Court game to Rod Laver Arena, and was seated in a row with the man they call Rocket during Novak Djokovic’s match on Australia Day. The two tennis greats are celebrating Grand Slam milestones in back-to-back years. Last year, Laver celebrated the 50th anniversary of his calendar-year Grand Slam — his second — in 1969. He also won all four of the tennis majors in 1962. Court is marking 50 years since her first Grand Slam. Court won all four majors in 1970 during a dominant sequence when she captured eight titles in nine majors, starting with the Australian Open in 1969 and finishing with the Australian Open in ’71. She holds the all-time record for most Grand Slam singles titles with 24, one more than Serena Williams, including 11 after the beginning of the professional era. She also holds the record for most Grand Slam titles with 64, including titles in in singles, doubles and mixed doubles at the same major twice. While her tennis achievements are unquestionable, some of Court’s views since becoming an ordained minister in 1991 and founding a Pentecostal church in Perth four years later have been divisive. Tennis Australia confirmed last November it plans to honor the 50th anniversary of the 1970 Grand Slam, but stressed that Court’s anti-gay views “do not align with our values of equality, diversity and inclusion.” Court caused controversy in 2017 by saying the devil was to blame for young people questioning their sexuality and wrote a public letter urging Australians to vote against same-sex marriage. Since then, same-sex marriage has since been legalized in Australia. Maureen Connolly in 1953 and Steffi Graf in 1988 are the only two other women to have won all four Grand Slams in the calendar year. ___ AP Sports Writer Dennis Passa contributed to this report. ___ More AP Tennis: https://apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Working against the clock in freezing temperatures, Turkish rescue teams pulled more survivors from collapsed buildings Sunday, days after a powerful magnitude 6.8 earthquake hit the country's east. Authorities said the death toll rose to at least 35 people. Turkish television showed Ayse Yildiz, 35, and her 2-year-old daughter Yusra being dragged out of the rubble of a collapsed apartment building in the city of Elazig. They had been trapped for 28 hours after the earthquake struck on Friday night. The magnitude 6.8 quake also injured over 1,600 people but 45 survivors have been pulled alive from the rubble so far, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan told a news conference Sunday in Istanbul. As overnight temperatures dropped to -5 degrees Celsius (23 degrees Fahrenheit), emergency teams set up more than 9,500 tents for displaced residents and distributed 17,000 hot meals. Rescue teams concentrated their efforts in the city's Mustafa Pasa neighborhood and the nearby town of Sivrice, the closest residential area to the quake's epicenter. Nearly 680 aftershocks rocked the region as more than 3,500 rescue experts scrambled through wrecked buildings to reach survivors, working around the clock. A magnitude 4.3 quake hit also neighboring Malatya province on Sunday morning, the Turkish Disaster and Emergency Management Presidency (AFAD) said. The agency said 76 buildings were destroyed and more than 1,000 damaged in the quake. Unmanned aerial drones were being used to survey damaged neighborhoods and coordinate rescue efforts. Erdogan said every effort was being made to alleviate conditions and promised to house displaced residents as soon as possible. “Turkey has begun to heal the wounds of this great disaster in unity, togetherness and coming together,” he said. Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu promised financial help for the victims of the quake. The president visited the disaster zone on Saturday to inspect the rescue operation, meet with injured people in the hospital and attend the funeral of a mother and son. Erdogan also condemned what he called a “smear campaign” on social media by those questioning the Turkish government’s preparations for earthquakes. A prosecutor in Ankara has opened an investigation into social media posts about Friday's quake. Earthquakes are frequent in Turkey, which sits atop two major fault lines. Across Turkey, there was an outpouring of support for victims of the quake. Some soccer clubs announced they would donate the receipts of their weekend matches while fans of the Fenerbahce soccer club threw scarves and hats on to the pitch during a game in Istanbul, chanting “Cold Elazig, Fenerbahce is with you!” Health Minister Fahrettin Koca said Sunday that 104 people were receiving hospital treatment after the quake, 34 of them in intensive care but not in critical condition. Victims of the quake were taking refugee in tents, mosques, schools, sports halls and student dormitories. Authorities warned people not to return to homes that could be unsafe. A prison in Adiyaman, 110 kilometers (70 miles) southwest of the epicenter, was evacuated due to damage, with more than 800 prisoners transferred to nearby jails. Friday’s main quake hit at 8:55 p.m in the city that lies 565 kilometers (350 miles) east of Ankara. It's not the first time Elazig has seen a fatal quake — a magnitude 6.0 earthquake killed 51 people there in 2010. Turkey's worst quake in decades came in 1999, when a pair of strong earthquakes struck northwest Turkey, killing around 18,000 people.
  • A patient in Southern California is the third person in the U.S. to be diagnosed with the new pneumonia-like virus from China, health officials said. The Centers for Disease Control confirmed a traveler from the Chinese city of Wuhan — the epicenter of the outbreak — tested positive for the virus, the Orange County Health Care Agency announced just before midnight Saturday. The patient is in isolation at a hospital and in good condition, a release from the agency said. The virus can cause fever, coughing, wheezing and pneumonia. It is a member of the coronavirus family that's a close cousin to the deadly SARS and MERS viruses that have caused outbreaks in the past. The first known case in California comes on the heels of diagnoses in Washington state, on Jan. 21, and Chicago, on Jan. 24. Both patients — in Washington, a man in his 30s, and in Chicago, a woman in her 60s — had also traveled to China. The death toll from the virus in China is at 56 so far. China has issued massive travel bans in hard-hit sections of that country to try to stem spread of the virus, and the U.S. Consulate in Wuhan announced Sunday that it would evacuate its personnel and some private citizens aboard a charter flight. The CDC expects more Americans to be diagnosed with the newly discovered virus, which is believed to have an incubation period of about two weeks, as worldwide the number of confirmed cases nears 2,000. The CDC is screening passengers on direct and connecting flights from Wuhan at five major airports in Atlanta, Chicago, New York City, San Francisco and Los Angeles. The Orange County patient had contacted local health officials, who provided guidance to reduce exposure to the public while awaiting laboratory confirmation from the CDC. The Orange County agency has consulted with the CDC and the California Department of Health and will follow up with people who have had close contact with the patient. Guidance from the CDC advises that people who have had casual contact with the patient are at “minimal risk” for developing infection. There's no evidence that person-to-person transmission occurred in Orange County, and the risk of local transmission remains low, the release said. Further details about the case weren't released. The CDC hadn't added the Southern California case to its summary of U.S. cases as of early Sunday.
  • The aunt of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un made her first public appearance in about six years, state media reported Sunday, quelling rumors that she was purged or executed by her nephew. According to a Korean Central News Agency dispatch, the name of Kim Kyong Hui was included in a list of top North Korean officials who watched a performance marking Lunar New Year's Day with Kim Jong Un at a Pyongyang theater on Saturday. North Korea’s main newspaper also released a photo showing Kim Kyong Hui sitting near Kim Jong Un and his wife, Ri Sol Ju, at the Samjiyon Theater. Kim Kyong Hui, 73, was once an influential figure in North Korea as the only sister of late North Korean leader Kim Jong Il, the father of Kim Jong Un. She held a slew of top posts such as a four-star army general and a ruling Workers’ Party departmental director. She was also believed to have played a key role in grooming Kim Jong Un as the next leader after Kim Jong Il suffered a stroke in 2008. Kim Jong Un eventually inherited power after his father died of a heart attack in late 2011. Kim Kyong Hui’s fate had been in doubt after Kim Jong Un had her husband, Jang Song Thaek, executed for treason in December 2013. He was once considered the North’s No. 2. Days after Jang’s execution, Kim Kyong Hui’s name was mentioned in a KCNA dispatch as a member of a funeral committee for another top official. But she missed a state ceremony commemorating the second anniversary of Kim Jong Il’s death days later. Her name had since never been mentioned in North Korean state media until Sunday's KCNA report. Some North Korea monitoring groups in Seoul and foreign media outlets had speculated Kim Jong Un had his aunt also executed or purged, or she died of health problems. Outside experts said Kim Kyong Hui had long suffered from liver and heart problems and high blood pressure. Analyst Cheong Seong-Chang at South Korea's private Sejong Institute said Kim Kyong Hui’s reemergence suggested Kim Jong Un was attempting to strengthen a unity of his ruling family as he’s pushing to harden his position toward the United States in stalled nuclear negotiations. Cheong, however, predicted that Kim Kyong Hui won’t likely regain her political influence as she has no position in the North’s powerful Politburo, whose memberships have already been filled with new figures.
  • It made sense to Sofia Kenin that Coco Gauff would be the one getting all of the attention and generating all of the buzz. That's only natural when Gauff is 15 and making tennis history time and time again. “Yeah, I mean, the hype is for her. She's obviously done great stuff, of course. It's absolutely normal. Just (tried) not to let that get in my head,' Kenin said. “Of course, I didn't do it for the hype. I did it for myself, because I wanted to prove to myself that I could do it.” Well, Sofia, you did it. Now get ready for the spotlight to shine your way. Kenin stopped Gauff's latest Grand Slam run by beating her 6-7 (5), 6-3, 6-0 in the Australian Open's fourth round on Sunday. Like Gauff, Kenin is a young — although, at 21, not quite as young — American and she reached her first major quarterfinal with the victory. “I want to show who I am, show my best tennis, show why I'm there, why I belong,” the 14th-seeded Kenin said. “I'm doing that.” In her previous match, the 67th-ranked Gauff beat Naomi Osaka to become the youngest player in the professional era to defeat the reigning women's champion at the Australian Open. At Wimbledon last year, Gauff became the youngest qualifier ever at that tournament, beat Venus Williams in the first round and made it all the way to the fourth. Entering Sunday, Gauff was 8-2 in Grand Slam action, with her only losses to women who have been ranked No. 1 and own multiple major titles: Halep (at Wimbledon) and Osaka (at the U.S. Open). Hence the aforementioned hype. “I couldn't really write this,” Gauff said. “I don't think anybody could really write how this past (several) months have gone.” She did not play as well as she has been this time, though, winding up with 48 unforced errors, more than twice as many as Kenin's 22. Gauff's power is impressive. One tiny indication: She slammed a forehand into the net so hard that it dislodged a piece of a sponsor's white plastic sign. Kenin can't copy that. But thanks to her relentless ball-tracking and a bit of in-your-face attitude with a racket in hand, Kenin surged up the WTA rankings from 52nd to 12th in 2019 while winning her first three tour-level singles titles plus a couple in doubles. “She definitely put a lot of balls in the court,' Gauff said. “She's quick.” Just before Gauff announced herself last season, Kenin delivered her own breakthrough at the French Open by upsetting Serena Williams to get to the round of 16 at a major for the first time. Now Kenin has taken another step. Wasn't easy, though. After double-faulting twice in the tiebreaker to drop the opening set — “For sure, nerves,” Kenin acknowledged — she immediately tilted things the other way, breaking in the initial game of the second and never letting that lead slip away. When it ended, appropriately enough, on a missed backhand by Gauff, Kenin dropped her racket at the baseline and covered her face as tears welled in her eyes. “Anyone would get pretty emotional for the first time,” said Kenin, who next faces another woman making her Slam quarterfinal debut, 78th-ranked Ons Jabeur of Tunisia. Jabeur was a 7-6 (4), 6-1 winner against 27th-seeded Wang Qiang, who surprised Serena Williams in the third round. The wins for Kenin and Jabeur ended at about the same time, and the future opponents soon found each other cooling down side-by-side on exercise bicycles. Kenin laughed as she described the scene this way: “She's like, ‘Good job.’ I'm like, ‘You, too.' It was fun, a funny moment. She's like, ‘Are you feeling tired?’ 'No, I'm good.' She's like, ‘Yeah, me, too.’ I'm like, 'OK. I'll see you on Tuesday, then.'” Also advancing was last year's runner-up in Melbourne, two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova, who was down a set and a break before coming back to defeat No. 22 Maria Sakkari 6-7 (4), 6-3, 6-2. Kvitova's quarterfinal opponent will be either No. 1 seed Ash Barty — trying to become the first Australian to win the nation's Grand Slam tournament since the 1970s — or No. 18 Alison Riske of the United States. In men's fourth-round action, defending champion Novak Djokovic moved into a matchup against No. 32 Milos Raonic. Roger Federer was scheduled to play during the night session. Raonic, the 2016 Wimledon runner-up, was asked whether he thinks Djokovic, who owns 16 Grand Slam titles, eventually will catch Federer, who has 20. “I just hope,” Raonic replied, “I can stop him at this one.” ___ Follow Howard Fendrich on Twitter at http://twitter.com/HowardFendrich ___ More AP Tennis: https://www.apnews.com/apf-Tennis and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports