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    Firefighters say a fire has burned about one-fourth of the roof of Turin's Cavallerizza Reale, a UNESCO World Heritage site in the center of the northern Italian city, hitting an area of the building once used for the royal stables. Firefighters rushed to the scene early Monday and managed to put out the flames. No injuries were reported. The cause of the fire is still unknown. According to Adriana Rinaldi, a spokeswoman at the scene, the fire started around 8 a.m. and burned through a portion of the roof before firefighters were able to put it out. Teams are still trying to secure the area. The building was abandoned in the past few years. Another fire hit the same part of the site in 2014.
  • The prime minister of Montenegro — a small Balkan nation that is the next in line to join the European Union — has expressed hope that once Brexit is finalized the EU's enlargement policy would regain importance. Dusko Markovic tells The Associated Press that once the issue of Britain's departure from the bloc is wrapped up it would 'free the EU from a major problem' and herald 'new opportunities for candidate countries' such as Montenegro. The Adriatic nation of 600,000 that is seeking EU membership after joining NATO in 2017 amid strong opposition from Russia. But Markovic warns that the EU decision not to open membership negotiations with North Macedonia and Albania sends a negative signal to the volatile Western Balkan region, where Russia has stepped up efforts to regain historic influence.
  • WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange is expected to appear in court as he fights extradition to the United States on charges of conspiring to hack into a Pentagon computer. The 48-year-old Australian is set to appear at Westminster Magistrates' Court for a case management hearing. Former Home Secretary Sajid Javid signed an order in June allowing Assange to be extradited. U.S. authorities accuse Assange of scheming with former Army intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning to break a password for a classified government computer. The case is expected to take months to resolve, with each side able to make several appeals of unfavorable rulings.
  • The Latest on Britain's impending departure from the European Union (all times local): 9:10 a.m. A French official has not ruled out granting a new delay to Britain's withdrawal from the bloc on condition that the U.K. clarifies its reasons for wanting a Brexit delay. The deputy minister for European affairs, Amelie de Montchalin, told French news broadcaster BFM TV that 'there is no new delay without any conditions, without justifications' like a parliamentary election or a new referendum on Brexit. She said France doesn't want the situation 'to last forever' beyond the current Oct. 31 Brexit deadline. French President Emmanuel Macron, who had a phone call with British Prime Minister Boris Johnson over the weekend, called for a quick clarification of the U.K.'s position. In a statement, he said a delay 'would not be in any party's interest.' ___ 8:50 a.m. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to push for a vote on his European Union divorce deal as Parliament prepares for a week of guerrilla warfare over Brexit. Johnson plans to kick things off by asking for a 'straight up-and-down vote' on the EU divorce agreement on Monday, two days after lawmakers voted to delay approving the deal, according to his office. House of Commons Speaker John Bercow could refuse to allow such a vote because parliamentary rules generally bar the same measure from being considered a second time during the same session of Parliament unless something has changed. Johnson's Conservative government will also introduce the legislation necessary to implement the Brexit agreement, opening the door to potentially lengthy debates and amendments that could scuttle the deal. ___ 7:40 a.m. Germany's economy minister is suggesting it will be a few days before the European Union decides whether to grant a delay to Britain's withdrawal from the bloc. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson grudgingly sent a letter seeking an extension of the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline after Parliament slammed the brakes on his effort to push through a new divorce deal. German Economy Minister Peter Altmaier noted on Deutschlandfunk radio Monday that Johnson's government will attempt to get a vote on the deal this week. He added 'we will have somewhat more clarity in the coming days, and we will then exercise our responsibility and quickly make a decision.' He said he wouldn't have a problem with an extension by 'a few days or a few weeks' if that rules out a no-deal Brexit.
  • The Spanish government says it will exhume and relocate the remains of late military dictator Gen. Francisco Franco on Thursday. In a statement Monday, the government said the remains would be taken from the grandiose mausoleum at the Valley of the Fallen complex outside Madrid and taken to a discreet grave close to the capital by helicopter. The procedure was authorized after the Supreme Court recently dismissed the objections by Franco's family. The government is pushing ahead with the exhumation before Spain holds a general election on Nov. 10. Franco ruled Spain between 1939 and 1975.
  • British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is expected to push for a vote on his European Union divorce deal as Parliament prepares for a week of guerrilla warfare over Brexit. Johnson plans to kick things off by asking for a 'straight up-and-down vote' on the EU divorce agreement on Monday, two days after lawmakers voted to delay approving the deal, according to his office. House of Commons Speaker John Bercow could refuse to allow such a vote because parliamentary rules generally bar the same measure from being considered a second time during the same session of Parliament unless something has changed. Johnson's Conservative government will also introduce the legislation necessary to implement the Brexit agreement, opening the door to potentially lengthy debates or amendments that could scuttle the deal.
  • Germany's economy minister is suggesting it will be a few days before the European Union decides whether to grant a delay to Britain's withdrawal from the bloc. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson grudgingly sent a letter seeking an extension of the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline after Parliament slammed the brakes on his effort to push through a new divorce deal. German Economy Minister Peter Altmaier noted on Deutschlandfunk radio Monday that Johnson's government will attempt to get a vote on the deal this week. He added 'we will have somewhat more clarity in the coming days, and we will then exercise our responsibility and quickly make a decision.' He said he wouldn't have a problem with an extension by 'a few days or a few weeks' if that rules out a no-deal Brexit.
  • The National Weather Service confirmed a tornado touched down in Dallas on Sunday night, causing structural damage and knocking out electricity to thousands. Meteorologist Jason Godwin said radar confirmed the twister hit the ground near Love Field Airport and moved northeast through the city. There were no reports of fatalities or serious injuries as of 12:20 a.m. Monday, according to a release from the city of Dallas. Local media outlets reported several homes and businesses were damaged, power lines downed and tree limbs were scattered across roadways. The city said there were reports of gas leaks north of Walnut Hill in north Dallas. Police and Fire-Rescue were assessing damaged structures. Nearly 112,000 electric customers were without power as of 12:50 a.m., according to Oncor's online outage map. Around 60,000 of those customers were within Dallas, according to the city, which is opening a shelter by 2 a.m. Seven people escaped a structure that collapsed in northwest Dallas, but Dallas Fire-Rescue were searching to see if anyone was left inside, spokesman Jason Evans said. WFAA reported that a convenience store collapsed in the storm, but the clerk told the station that everyone who was inside made it out safely. Evans said the department had also received multiple calls from people injured in their homes by broken glass. Godwin said the size and severity of the tornado won't be known until crews arrive to survey the damage. The storm happened as multiple severe thunderstorm watches and warnings covered portions of four counties, including Dallas County, and more stormy weather was expected in the area during the overnight hours. The city of Sachse, a northeast suburb of Dallas, said six houses 'sustained significant high-wind damage after severe weather moved through the area Sunday night.' Four homes were left uninhabitable, but no injuries had been reported. Dallas police said officers in one part of the city were going door-to-door to check on residents. Citing extensive damage to campuses, the Dallas Independent School District canceled Monday classes at six schools: David G. Burnet Elementary School, Leonides Gonzalez Cigarroa Elementary School, John J. Pershing Elementary School, Walnut Hill Elementary School, Edward H. Cary Middle School and Thomas Jefferson High School. The Episcopal School of Dallas also canceled classes. The schools are all in northwest Dallas.
  • Asian shares were mixed Monday amid uncertainties about Britain's exit from the European Union and the ongoing trade conflict between the U.S. and China. Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 gained nearly 0.3% in early trading to 22,548.07. South Korea's Kospi picked up 0.2% to 2,065.68, while Hong Kong's Hang Seng added 0.2% to 26,778.99. The S&P/ASX 200 in Australia lost 0.1% to 6,640.40, while the Shanghai Composite slipped 0.1% to 2,934.30. Shares fell in Taiwan and were mixed in Southeast Asia. British Prime Minister Boris Johnson is trying to win over rebellious lawmakers in time to meet the Oct. 31 Brexit deadline for the UK's exit from the 28-nation European Union. A vote over the weekend ended with an amendment that delays the proposed deal, leaving the situation uncertain. And EU officials have not yet responded to Johnson's reluctant request for an extension of the month's end deadline. 'The can is not kicked far down the road with UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson expected to seek a new 'meaningful vote' on his deal as soon as Monday with the countdown to the Brexit deadline,' Jingyi Pan of IG said in a commentary. Meanwhile, Japan reported that its exports fell 5.2% from a year earlier in September while imports slipped 1.5%. The resulting deficit of 123 billion yen ($1.1 billion) reflected weak exports to China, South Korea and other Asian countries, customs data showed. The mixed performance to start the week is a continuation of the wobbles that ended last week, when the S&P 500 index logged its second straight weekly gain even though stock indexes ended lower on Friday. Technology companies led the slide, which erased the major U.S. indexes' gains from the day before. Communication services, industrials and health care stocks also fell, outweighing gains in real estate companies, banks and elsewhere in the market. Investors are focusing on company earnings reports, searching for a clearer picture on the impact that the trade war between the U.S. and China is having on corporate profits and the broader economy. The S&P 500 index fell 0.4% to 2,986.20. The index is just 1.3% below its all-time high set in late July. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 1% to 26,770.20 and the Nasdaq lost 0.8%, to 8,089.54. The Russell 2000 index of smaller stocks gave up 0.4% to 1,535.48. Uncertainty over the standoff between Beijing and Washington has been roiling markets. Negotiators reached a truce last week that kept the conflict over trade and technology from escalating further, but both sides still have many issues to work out before reaching a substantive deal. ENERGY: Benchmark crude oil dipped 10 cents to $53.68 a barrel in electronic trading on the New York Mercantile Exchange. It fell 15 cents to $53.78 a barrel Friday. Brent crude oil, the international standard, dropped 20 cents to $59.22 a barrel. CURRENCIES: The dollar rose to 108.50 Japanese yen from 108.38 yen on Friday. The euro slipped to $1.1158 from $1.1174. ___ The summary of this story has been corrected to show Brexit deadline is Oct. 31, not 21.
  • That's not real Mexican food,' ''My grandma would slap you' and 'sellout' are just some of comments Jose and Leticia Gamiz received when they started their pop-up vegan Mexican food business, Mi Vegana Madre, four years ago. People saw them doing something new and took it personally, Jose Gamiz said. 'We even had somebody write (online) in Spanish, 'They're probably not even Mexican.'' Despite the haters, the couple's meat- and dairy-free endeavor has built a following. It's part of a growing vegan Mexican food industry in the U.S. that has seen Latinos take control of the kitchen and plant-based Mexican cuisine increasingly plant roots in areas with large Latino communities. Las Vegas and Austin, Texas, each have at least a few eateries or food trucks that are exclusively vegan Mexican. Across Southern California, there are a slew of options, including a vegan panaderia peddling traditional pastries. The vegan Mex wave now seems to be sweeping Arizona. Mi Vegana Madre expanded into a brick-and-mortar restaurant in the Phoenix suburb of Glendale last year. It offers vegan takes on carne asada, al pastor and nachos with a cashew cream-based cheese sauce. Another restaurant offering vegan Mexican and Mediterranean dishes opened in January a half-mile away. In September, a third place opened in Phoenix, also led by a Mexican American family. Keren Aguilar, 19, and sister Keyla Aguilar, 22, launched Earth Plant Based Cuisine in Phoenix's hipster Grand Avenue arts district. Other family members, including their mother, also work there. The menu includes fish tacos, churros and soy chorizo (Mexican sausage) — all made in-house. They also have a plant-based BBQ sandwich, burger and hot dog. The sisters and their parents have been vegan for nearly five years, and it was Keren's dream to open a vegan restaurant. It just so happened a space became available and a family friend was willing to be a financial partner. While most American vegan restaurants offer a few basic Mexican-inspired items, the Gamiz and Aguilar families are trying to capture the array of recipes they grew up on. 'We didn't want it to have a 'vegan taste' or be bland. We wanted it to have flavors, so our spices are very important to making it Mexican,' Keren Aguilar said. Gustavo Arellano, a Los Angeles-based columnist and author of 'Taco USA: How Mexican Food Conquered America,' said restaurants like Earth Plant Based Cuisine are bringing a level of authenticity beyond the 'hippy dippy white vegan stuff like tempeh, or they get a taco and put cubes of soy in it.' Arellano believes vegan food in Mexican and Hispanic cultures has blossomed as younger generations became inspired by ways they can cut animal products from cooking. 'What blew up the vegan Mexican movement was these pop-up vegan food fairs where you have not just Mexicans, but Central Americans,' Arellano said. Since opening their sit-down locations, both family-owned restaurants have also noticed Latinos of a certain age sampling the food. Jose Gamiz recalls wrongfully assuming a father and daughter, both Mexican, were frequent patrons because the girl was vegan. '(The father) said, 'I started doing it for my health,' and he was like, 'Nobody in my family will follow me except for my daughter,'' Gamiz said. 'Usually the men in the family are the ones that are more resistant. I think there's a misconception that you need meat to be manly.' Adults in the U.S. have a 40% chance of getting type 2 diabetes, but Hispanic and Latino adults have more than a 50% chance, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Hispanics/Latinos also are at greater risk of developing diabetes at a younger age and getting complications like kidney failure and vision loss. The CDC says some of the factors contributing to this are genetics and the cultural value in eating meals high in fat and calories. Yet for some Latinos, going sin carne can still feel like a sin. Linda Sepulveda, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, which has virtually no all-vegan Mexican restaurants, would find it hard to give up an omnivore's life. Her house is always stocked with ground beef, tortillas and salsa. 'I'm intrigued by (vegan Mexican), but I think a part of me knows it won't taste the same,' she said. 'We are always trying to find where we can add veggies, but there always has to be a main meat and everything else dresses it up.' While some may say veganizing is misappropriating Mexican food, the country's indigenous natives actually ate mostly plant-based foods, according to Arellano. Colonizers from Spain irrevocably altered the food culture with introductions of beef, lamb and pork. 'They don't realize, if you're real Mexicans, you're not supposed to be eating this meat in the first place because colonizers brought it over,' Arellano said. 'I eat everything, but I'll eat vegan Mex if it's good.' ___ Terry Tang is a member of The Associated Press' race and ethnicity team. Follow her on Twitter at https://twitter.com/ttangAP