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    More than 50 local police officers raided a local mental health hospital. Only Channel 2 Action News was there when detectives pulled evidence and questioned employees. Investigators spent hours going through evidence today at two Lakeview Behavioral Health buildings in Gwinnett County.  One is located on Medlock Bridge Road and the other is on One Technology Parkway. For months, former patients and their families have complained of unexplained injuries after leaving Lakeview. 'This is a very large-scale investigation,' said Gwinnett County Police Spokesperson Michele Pihera.  ON CHANNEL 2 AT 5 P.M.: We'll show you the EXCLUSIVE video of the raid and what the families of former patients are saying.      RELATED STORIES: Patient found in freezer, child loses toe: 46 claims of abuse investigated at mental health facility Police confirm death at behavioral health facility already under investigation Behavioral health facility under investigation after accusations of theft, sexual abuse  
  • Receiver Julio Jones, tight end Austin Hooper and first-round pick Chris Lindstrom are returning to the Atlanta Falcons' offense for Sunday's game against the Carolina Panthers. Coach Dan Quinn made the announcement after Friday's practice. Jones missed the Thanksgiving night loss to the New Orleans Saints with a shoulder injury. Hooper will be back on the field after sitting out three games with an injured knee. Lindstrom has been activated off the injured list and will start at right guard for the Falcons (3-9). Lindstrom, the No. 14 overall pick, hasn't played since breaking his right foot in the season opener at Minnesota. He is expected to share time with Matt Gono. Offensive linemen Ty Sambrailo (hamstring) and James Carpenter (concussion) won't play against the Panthers (5-7). Punter Matt Bosher (right groin) and safety Sharrod Neasman (shoulder) are questionable. ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Rob Gronkowski is enjoying life in retirement — one piece at a time. The former star tight end who helped the New England Patriots win three Super Bowls during his nine-year career uses jigsaw puzzles to lower his stress levels and to help his mental recovery. Gronkowski said in an interview with Reena Ninan for “CBS Sunday Morning” that airs Sunday on the CBS Television Network that he “just wasn't feeling like myself anymore” after retiring from playing football. He said the lifestyle caught up to him and he wasn't enjoying playing the game. The 30-year-old Gronkowski, who had 521 catches for 7,861 yards and 79 touchdowns, has used several methods to improve his life since his playing days, including nutrition programs, physical therapy — and solving puzzles. “It just lowered my stress levels just the way, you know, I was feeling,” Gronkowski said. “I just, you know, (was) just always anxious, always going. And I just needed to finally find some downtime to just relax.” Gronkowski, who estimates he had 20 concussions during his playing days, realized that doing puzzles was also helping him mentally, particularly with problem solving. “It was crazy,” he said. 'My brain was just clicking. It was just going. It was all on wheels.” HEY, ROOK! The Minnesota Vikings have four draft picks playing key roles on offense, starting with center Garrett Bradbury. Though the first-rounder from North Carolina State has had his share of welcome-to-the-NFL moments this season, Bradbury has shown steady improvement at a challenging position. Just ask quarterback Kirk Cousins, who sent an encouraging text message to the rookie on Tuesday, the day after Minnesota’s loss at Seattle. “He’s done a really good job for how much we’ve put on him,” Cousins said. Cousins had a greater purpose in mind with his message, too, recalling a pick-me-up he received as a rookie for Washington when coach Mike Shanahan summoned him to his office for a positive review during spring practices. “Going back to work that day and the next day and the day after that, to have confidence and belief that you’re doing something right and you’re going places, it makes all the difference,” Cousins said. “So I try to think back, ‘Who could I be Mike Shanahan for in a way and encourage them?' Sometimes it’s just a text or just walking off the field and telling somebody. You’re getting coached left and right and all the things that you need to do better, but you also need to hear when you’re doing things really well. I think people need to hear that. 'My dad calls it making deposits in peoples’ life and not just withdrawals. I’m going to make a lot of withdrawals as a quarterback: ‘Hey, I need you to do this. I need you to be here. You’ve got to do this better.’ But I certainly want to make sure I’m making deposits as well.” Said Bradbury: “To hear him say something like that is awesome. Just in the middle of the season when you’re in such a routine, it’s good to get something like that.” NOT EVEN AN ASTERISK To Tennessee Titans coach Mike Vrabel, there's really no significance for himself or even the history books of being the next-to-last team to play the Raiders in Oakland-Alameda County Coliseum. 'When I’m old and retired sitting around, I’ll say, ‘You know, the last game that they played in Oakland Coliseum? I coached in the one before that,'' Vrabel said with a heavy hint of sarcasm. “Not really sure what the significance is. ... You know the last game? I coached in the one before that one.” Vrabel did play at Oakland during his 14-year NFL career as a linebacker. He said the dirt infield from baseball always made playing in such stadiums unique. This visit comes well after the Oakland A's wrapped up the baseball season. 'I don’t think the dirt’s in there now,' Vrabel said. THANKS, COACH Panthers safety Eric Reid said when he first signed with Carolina last season, coach Ron Rivera told him he didn’t like that he was kneeling during the national anthem before NFL games. Rivera’s parents came from a military background, and he didn’t understand Reid’s mission. But Reid said he appreciates that Rivera, who was fired Tuesday as Carolina’s coach, took the time to research why he and former teammate Colin Kaepernick feel so strongly about speaking out about racial and social injustice in the United States, and why he took a knee during “The Star Spangled Banner.” “He told me openly when we met that he didn’t understand and was against what I was doing,” Reid said. “But after speaking to me and doing some research of his own, he changed his mind about it and supporting it.” Reid said that speaks volumes about Rivera’s personality. “It showed that he’s not close-minded,' Reid said, “and he is who he says he is when it comes to being accountable and speaking the truth.” GIVING SEASON Russell Wilson is making big plays both on and off the field this season. The Seattle Seahawks quarterback and his wife and recording artist Ciara's Why Not You Foundation partnered with DICK'S Sporting Goods and The DICK'S Foundation Sports Matter program to celebrate “Giving Tuesday” this week by surprising some young athletes in need. Wilson showed up at the DICK'S location in Bellevue, Washington, and gave each of the youngsters from the Seattle-based nonprofit Rainier Athletes with $200 gift cards to the sporting goods store. He also surprised the kids' representatives with a $25,000 Sports Matter grant from The DICK'S Sporting Goods Foundation. “I remember growing up going to DICK'S and around the holidays, I always wanted that new baseball glove or baseball bat,” said Wilson, who leads the NFL with 26 touchdown passes this season. 'Sometimes my parents had the means to get me gear, sometimes they didn’t. My goal was to be a professional athlete one day and here I am. 'It was special to help these kids have their opportunity to get geared up.” MATTY NICE Atlanta's Matt Ryan enters the Falcons' game against Carolina on Sunday with 49,966 yards passing in his career. That means if he throws for 34, he'll hit 50,000 and become the second-fastest player in NFL history to reach the mark. Ryan will be playing in his 186th game; only Drew Brees — in 183 games — accomplished the feat faster. After Brees and Ryan, the next fastest players to reach 50,000 are Peyton Manning (191 games), Dan Marino (193) and Philip Rivers (196). ___ AP Pro Football Writers Dave Campbell, Teresa M. Walker, Dennis Waszak Jr. and Barry Wilner; and AP Sports Writer Steve Reed contributed. ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • A Georgia prosecutor said he is appealing a judge's decision that three white former sheriff's deputies can't be tried on murder charges in the death of a black man who was repeatedly shot with a stun gun. District Attorney Hayward Altman of Georgia's Middle Judicial Circuit told news outlets the decision by Superior Court Judge H. Gibbs Flanders granting immunity for one-time officers was wrong, and he expects it to be overturned. Michael Howell, Rhett Scott and Henry Copeland, all former Washington County deputies, were charged in the death of Eurie Martin, 58, who asked for water at a home and wound up dying after being shot repeatedly with a stun gun. The judge, whose decision released last month detailed a struggle between the officers and Martin that went on for minutes, ruled that the officers had a “reasonable belief' that they were using a proper amount of force on the man. Mawuli Davis, an attorney for Martin’s relatives, said they were “extremely disappointed” with the ruling. Family members have said they believed Martin's race was a factor in the fatal confrontation. Martin, who suffered from schizophrenia, was walking to see relatives in Sandersville for his birthday in July 2017 when he went up a driveway and asked a homeowner for water. There wasn't a problem, the judge wrote, but the resident called 911 to report a person who may be “crazy” or “drunk.” The three deputies showed up within minutes of each other and followed Martin, who kept walking. Officers told investigators that Martin thew down a drink can and clenched his fists, ignoring commands to put his hands behind his back, before they began firing stun guns at him. Martin suffered respiratory arrest and died of an apparent heart attack, authorities have said. The officers were initially indicted in December 2017, but a judge threw out the case because a court reporter wasn't present during grand jury proceedings. New charges were filed last year that included false imprisonment and assault. The Middle Judicial Circuit covers five counties in rural east-central Georgia.
  • If you're planning on going out Friday, you may want to pack an umbrella.  Light, scattered rain is moving through parts of north Georgia right now and will continue through the evening.  [DOWNLOAD: WSB-TV's Weather App for alerts on any severe weather] A wedge will move later this weekend, bringing patchy drizzle and lower temperatures.  We're tracking the rain moving across north Georgia, NOW on Channel 2 Action News.
  • Several schools across Dunwoody were placed on lockdown Friday after a mental health patient walked away from a hospital. He has since been located in Sandy Springs and the lockdowns were lifted. Dunwoody police said that just before noon, officers responded to Peachford Hospital in reference to a patient who walked away from the hospital without being properly discharged. The 29-year-old patient was admitted to the hospital a few days ago, after threatening to 'shoot up' schools, police said. DeKalb Schools Police reported a level 1 lockdown at Peachtree Charter Middle School, Chestnut Elementary Charter School, Dunwoody Elementary School, Dunwoody High School and Vanderlyn Elementary School. We're talking to police for updates about the incident on Channel 2 Action News starting at 4 p.m. MORE: Police found the man on Roswell Road. He will not be facing any charges. He'll be turned back over to his physician and hospitalized. https://t.co/FN2MvY0rMz — Mike Petchenik (@MPetchenikWSB) December 6, 2019    
  • The winning numbers in Friday afternoon's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'All or Nothing Day' game were: 01-02-03-05-06-08-10-11-13-14-17-22 (one, two, three, five, six, eight, ten, eleven, thirteen, fourteen, seventeen, twenty-two)
  • LSU is perfectly comfortable in an offensive shootout, both teams racing up and down the field, throwing caution to the wind and lighting up the scoreboard with big play after big play. Georgia would prefer a defensive quagmire, where every yard in a struggle, the sort of knock-'em-back stalemate that puts a premium on old-school concepts like field position and turnovers. In that never-ending debate over what's more important — offense or defense? — the Southeastern Conference championship game offers a most compelling match-up. The No. 1 Tigers (12-0, No. 2 CFP) are the second-highest scoring team in the land. The No. 4 Bulldogs (11-1, No. 4 CFP) have allowed fewer points than every team but one. “When you come out of the SEC and represent your programs in this game, you've been through the gauntlet,” Georgia coach Kirby Smart said. LSU is averaging 48.7 points — trailing only Ohio State — with a high-octane spread offense led by Heisman Trophy favorite Joe Burrow and a pair of 1,000-yard receivers. It has been a stunning turnaround for a program long known for its stalwart defense but one that often struggled to put points on the board. The last LSU team to go undefeated during the regular season was the 2011 Tigers, who were totally stifled by Alabama in the national championship game. That team lost 21-0 and did not even cross midfield until the closing minutes. What a contrast to this team, which has twice eclipsed 60 points, scored at least 50 in four other games and has been held below 36 just one time. The Tigers have no intention of backing off against the Bulldogs, though Burrow offered a bit of a caveat. “We’re going to keep our same mentality,” he said. 'We’re going to attack, we’re going to go fast, we’re going to throw the ball down the field, but also understanding this is one of the best defenses in the country, so you’re going to have to take what the defense gives you and march the ball down the field. They’re not going to give you anything easy.” Georgia's previous opponents can attest to that. The Junkyard Dawgs are surrendering a puny average of 10.4 points — second only to Clemson — and have recorded three shutouts for the first time since 1981. They have not given up more than 17 points in regulation (their only loss, a 20-17 setback against South Carolina, went to double overtime). “We've done some amazing things as a defense in this regular season,' Georgia safety J.R. Reed said. “We've got our work cut out for us this game.” As is always the case with the SEC championship, the winner is surely headed to the College Football Playoff. But many pundits believe LSU, which has high-quality victories over Alabama, Florida and Auburn, has already done enough to claim a spot. So a Georgia upset could mean a postseason two-fer for a conference that already holds super-sized influence over the college football landscape. “We've got to finish the SEC championship, and then let's see where we're ranked,' LSU coach Ed Orgeron said. “None of that stuff matters right now. We've got to win this football game. This is a big football game for our team, and that's all we're thinking about.” Some things to keep an eye on when the Tigers face the Bulldogs: SHORING UP LSU’s 35th-ranked defense looked like a liability much of the season — particularly in mid-November at Ole Miss, when the Tigers allowed 614 yards and 37 points. The last game was a different story, however. LSU surrendered just 169 yards, picked off three passes and came recorded six sacks — one for a safety — in a 50-7 rout of Texas A&M, which came in averaging 32.1 points per game. “Too bad it came late in the season, but it’s only going to get better,” edge pass-rusher K’Lavon Chaisson said. “There’s too many high-caliber players on this defense to where we shouldn’t be clicking how we wanted to click.” FROMM'S SLUMP It's been a strange year for Georgia quarterback Jake Fromm, who has struggled to find the level of consistency he showed his first two seasons. The last four games have really been a puzzler. Fromm has thrown 10 touchdown passes with no interceptions, but he's failed to complete 50% of his throws in any of those contests. Before this stretch, he only had three games in his entire career when he didn't connect on half his passes. Fromm's struggles have come under extra scrutiny because of Justin Fields' stellar season at Ohio State. He was Fromm's backup a year ago, but failed to get much playing time and transferred to the Buckeyes. SWIFT'S SHOULDER Georgia star D'Andre Swift has rushed for 1,203 yards, but he left last week's victory over Georgia Tech with an injured shoulder. Smart downplayed the injury, saying it was merely a contusion. “I expect D'Andre to be fine,” the coach said. If Swift is still hurting, it will fall to Brian Herrien, James Cook and Zamir White to pick up the slack. The Bulldogs know they'll be limited in the receiving corps. Lawrence Cager is likely done for the season after ankle surgery, while freshman George Pickens must sit out the first half after getting ejected from the Georgia Tech game. BACKFIELD BALLER With so much attention on Burrow and JaMarr Chase, a Biletnikoff Award finalist at receiver, opposing defenses often seem to lose track of diminutive but dangerous scat back Clyde Edwards-Helaire. The 5-foot-8, 209-pound junior has 1,146 yards and 15 touchdowns this season, including 188 yards against Arkansas and 172 at Ole Miss. He was also one of the stars of LSU’s 46-41 triumph at Alabama, rushing for 103 yards and three touchdowns to go with nine receptions for 77 yards and a score. Orgeron and Burrow often compare LSU’s use of Edwards-Helaire to the New Orleans Saints’ use of Alvin Kamara. That seems apt because Joe Brady, one of LSU’s new offensive assistants, spent the previous two seasons on the Saints’ staff. REVENGE FACTOR When these teams met during the 2018 regular season, LSU romped to a 36-16 victory in Baton Rouge. It will be interesting to see if the Bulldogs are still smarting from a game that happened nearly 14 months ago. “I’m sure they’re going to want some revenge on us,' Burrow said. 'But it’s the SEC championship. I don’t think you need any more motivation.” ___ AP Sports Writer Brett Martel in New Orleans contributed to this report. ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25 ___ Follow Paul Newberry on Twitter at www.twitter.com/pnewberry1963 His work can be found at https://apnews.com
  • The Democratic-controlled House approved a bill Friday that would restore key sections of the Voting Rights Act that once required officials in all or parts of 15 mostly Southern states to receive federal approval before making changes to the voting process. The bill would amend the 1965 law to impose new obligations on states and local jurisdictions, essentially reversing a 2013 Supreme Court decision that tossed out a 'pre-clearance' provision that determined which jurisdictions needed federal oversight of elections. The bill was approved, 228—187. Veteran Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., an icon of the civil rights movement, announced the tally in a sign of the importance Democratic leaders place on the measure. Just one Republican, Pennsylvania Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick, joined Democrats in voting for the bill. It now goes to the Republican-controlled Senate, where it is unlikely to move forward. Lewis and other supporters said the measure would help prevent voter suppression in the South and other areas by developing a process to require states and localities with a recent history of voting rights violations to pre-clear election changes with the Justice Department. Strict voter registration requirements, polling place confusion and other obstacles faced by Georgia voters last year show why federal oversight of elections is still needed in places with a history of discrimination, supporters said. Problems also were reported in Florida, where elections officials came under withering criticism for their handling of a legally required recount in close races for governor and U.S. Senate. “No right is more precious to our citizenship than the right of all Americans to be able to vote,” said Rep. Terri Sewell, D-Ala., the bill's chief sponsor. “When Americans are not able to cast their ballots, their votes are silenced.'' Elected officials 'should be alarmed if any American who wants to cast a ballot is unable to cast a ballot,” she said. The White House opposes the bill, calling it an example of federal overreach. The Democratic-backed measure would give the federal government “too much authority over an even greater number of voting practices and decisions made by states and local governments without justifying the current needs for such policies,'' the White House said in a statement. The Supreme Court has already ruled that similar restrictions imposed by Congress on states and localities are unconstitutional, the White House said. Sewell said the 2013 Supreme Court ruling in Shelby v. Holder has led to renewed discrimination against minority voters in her state and throughout the South. Some of the laws were passed in the name of combating voter fraud, but Sewell said the real issue was voter suppression — not fraud. The laws passed by Republican-leaning states were aimed at 'suppressing the voice of certain Americans, and that's un-American,'' Sewell said on the House floor. Whether African Americans in Georgia or Native Americans in North Dakota, members of minority groups have continually faced barriers to voting, she said. 'This is a seminal piece of legislation that will restore, for the people, the right to vote,'' Sewell said, adding that Republicans and Democrats alike “should be making sure it's easier to vote, not harder to vote.'' Rep. Rodney Davis, R-Illinois, said he agreed with that sentiment. “Every eligible American who wants to vote should be able to cast a ballot,' he said, calling the Voting Rights Act “a great example of a bipartisan solution that is working today to protect Americans from voter discrimination.'' But Davis said Sewell's bill would do more than reauthorize the voting rights law. “Instead, it would require the Department of Justice to clear every election law in this country, taking that power away from states.' Democrats have approved four bills addressing voting rights or election security since taking the majority this year, “and all of them have one common theme: federalizing elections,'' Davis said. The bill approved Friday 'is simply more of the same.”
  • The winning numbers in Friday afternoon's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Georgia FIVE Midday' game were: 5-1-5-4-0 (five, one, five, four, zero)