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    A Minnesota man was arrested last week after DNA from a used napkin he threw away at his daughter’s hockey game matched DNA left at the scene of the brutal 1993 stabbing death of a Minneapolis woman. Jerry Arnold Westrom, 52, of Isanti, is charged with second-degree murder in the slaying of Jeanne Ann Childs, according to the Minneapolis Police Department. The arrest was made Feb. 11 following a years-long renewed investigation by Minneapolis detectives, the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension’s forensic lab, Hennepin County Sheriff’s Office investigators and Minneapolis-based FBI agents.  “Our efforts to increase public safety and ensure justice has no timeline. This case is an excellent example of great collaboration between our law enforcement partners,” Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo said in a news release.  Jill Sanborn, special agent in charge of the FBI’s Minneapolis field office, said the case “underscores law enforcement’s ability to use every tool at its disposal” to solve crimes.  “We all hope Jeanne’s family can finally find peace as a result of this tenacious effort by officers and agents,” Sanborn said. >> Read more trending news Members of Childs’ family were in the courtroom Friday as Westrom made his first court appearance, according to the Minneapolis Star Tribune. Westrom’s wife, son and daughter were also there, along with about 20 other supporters.  They watched as the well-known businessman’s defense attorney, Steven Meshbesher, successfully argued that his client’s bail should be reduced from $1 million to $500,000.  Meshbesher argued that Westrom, a lifelong resident of Minnesota, was not a flight risk. According to the Star Tribune, he manages an organic farm just outside of Isanti.   “What we’ve got is a very unsolved case and it was charged, in my opinion, prematurely,” Meshbesher said, according to the Star Tribune.  Westrom was released on bond Friday night, according to Hennepin County Jail records.  A violent death The criminal complaint against Westrom, which was obtained by the Star Tribune, outlines Childs’ violent June 13, 1993, death: Minneapolis police officers were called to an apartment Childs allegedly used for prostitution because another tenant in the building saw water coming from the apartment. The officers found Childs dead in her running shower, naked except for a pair of socks.  She had dozens of stab wounds, including several inflicted after she was already dead, the complaint said.  The walls of Childs’ bathroom, bedroom and living room were covered with blood, the Star Tribune reported. Finger, palm and footprints were found at the scene.  It was not immediately clear if any of those prints matched Westrom. Investigators at the time collected Childs’ bedding, a towel, a washcloth and a T-shirt, as well as a bloodstain found on the sink, the newspaper reported.  Childs’ live-in boyfriend was ruled out as a suspect after detectives confirmed he was not in Minnesota at the time of her death.  The case soon went cold, but a Minneapolis detective, encouraged by the advances in DNA technology, renewed the investigation in 2015, the Star Tribune reported. DNA samples from the scene were sent to the Bureau of Criminal Apprehension and a private DNA company.  FBI agents ran the results through an online genealogy website last year, using the same technique California cold case investigators used to secure the arrest of Joseph James DeAngelo, the alleged Golden State Killer who killed more than a dozen people and raped more than 50 women in the 1970s and 80s.  Since DeAngelo’s arrest, about 50 other cold cases across the U.S. have been solved using public genealogy websites, the Star Tribune reported.  Following the DNA trail The genealogy website used by Minnesota investigators led them to two possible suspects in Childs’ slaying, one of them Westrom. Hennepin County Attorney Mike Freeman told the Star Tribune either Westrom or a close family member had apparently submitted DNA to learn more about their family tree. Westrom, who was 27 and single at the time of Childs’ killing, worked in Minneapolis in 1993. He moved about six months after the homicide, the newspaper reported.  Investigators began trailing Westrom in January, seeking an opportunity to surreptitiously obtain a sample of his DNA. At his daughter’s hockey game at a Wisconsin hockey rink, they had their chance. Westrom bought a hot dog from the concession stand, wiping his mouth with a napkin when he was done eating, the Star Tribune reported. Investigators picked up the napkin after he tossed it in the trash. DNA taken from the napkin matched the DNA from the Childs crime scene, Freeman said. Another DNA sample taken from Westrom after his arrest confirmed the match.  The prosecutor said he is confident the case will withstand any legal challenges by the defense.  “When discarding something in the trash, the (U.S.) Supreme Court has said many times, it is fair game,” Freeman said.  Westrom’s attorney told Minnesota Public Radio News that the evidence against his client is thin. He argued that the DNA sample obtained at the crime scene was from semen, not blood. Because Childs was a sex worker, the evidence links him to possible sex, but not the homicide, the defense lawyer said.  “The sperm shows up allegedly matching, but not the blood,” Meshbesher told MPR News. “What we’ve got is not any record of violence, not connecting it to the blood, not to the weapon, because they didn’t find it.” MPR News reported that the criminal complaint alleged that the DNA samples from the crime scene came from Childs’ comforter and the towel.  The Star Tribune reported that investigators have not yet compared Westrom’s DNA to the blood found in Childs’ bathroom. The complaint stated the case remains under investigation.  “They don’t know what the facts are,” Meshbesher told MPR News. “You don’t charge a case before you know what the facts are. You need to do the investigation first.” A sordid arrest history Westrom denied all the allegations against him, the criminal complaint said. He denied recognizing Childs, being in her apartment or having sex with any woman in 1993. Investigators said he told them he had no explanation for how his DNA could have been at the crime scene.  Meshbesher disputed the account of his client’s interview given in the complaint, MPR News reported.  Despite Westrom’s high standing in his community, part of which comes from his involvement in youth sports, he has a record of drunken driving convictions dating back to 1996, court records showed.  He also has two arrests on his record for prostitution-related offenses. A 2012 charge was dismissed, but he was convicted in Stearns County in 2015 of trying to hire a prostitute.  The Star Tribune reported Westrom was snagged in a police sting in which he thought he was soliciting a teenager for sex. His probation for that offense ended in February 2018, the court records showed.  Childs’ mother, Betty Eakman, told the newspaper the story of her troubled daughter, who dropped out of school in the sixth grade and was a repeat runaway as a teen. Eakman said her daughter’s problems seemed to begin following the 1971 shooting death of her stepfather, who was killed by his brother-in-law and business partner.  She said her daughter bounced from place to place in Minneapolis prior to her death. Eakman expressed gratitude for the science that helped solve her daughter’s slaying. “I am so happy they have come out with this new technology so it can help other cases to be solved,” Eakman told the Star Tribune. Childs’ sister, Cindy Kosnitch, credited Eakman with keeping Childs in the minds of investigators.  “This has been very hard on our family, of course, but I have a very determined mom who always kept in contact with Minneapolis police,” Kosnitch told the paper. “She refused to let Jeanie be forgotten and wanted some type of closure, as most parents would.”
  • Your favorite Girl Scout Cookies may have a different name depending on where you are located. Peanut Butter Patties are Tagalongs in some areas. Shortbread can be referred to as  Trefoils. But in one Colorado town, Samoas are not even called Caramel deLites  -- they go by the name Momoas. >> Read more trending news  Charlotte Holmberg and her marketing professional mother came up with the idea of changing the name of the chocolate cookies that are covered in caramel and coconut to Momoas, KUSA reported. To seal the deal, they pasted a photo of “Aquaman” actor Jason Momoa on the box, the television station reported.  They put the word out on Facebook about the change for the favorite cookie, and they’ve been selling like hotcakes. “The moms are getting really excited and they’re saying they need them,” Charlotte told KUSA.
  • President Donald Trump declared a national emergency Friday in order to fund a wall along the southern border of the United States. >> Read more trending news  Trump is not the first president to declare a national emergency.  There have been 58 national emergencies since the act went into effect – every president since Jimmy Carter has declared at least one national emergency. Here, from the Brennan Center for Justice, is a list of those emergencies:  President Jimmy Carter Nov. 14, 1979 (still in effect): A national emergency in response to the Iran hostage crisis, blocking Iranian government property. April 17, 1980: Further prohibitions on transactions with Iran. It has never been terminated nor continued. President Ronald Reagan Oct. 14, 1983: Continuation of Export Control Regulations, revoked in 1983. March 30, 1984: Continuation of Export Control Regulations, revoked in 1985. May 1, 1985: Prohibiting Trade and Certain Other Transactions Involving Nicaragua, revoked in 1990. Sept. 9, 1985: Prohibiting Trade and Certain Other Transactions Involving South Africa, revoked 1991. Jan. 17, 1986: Prohibiting Trade and Certain Transactions Involving Libya, revoked in 2004. April 8, 1988: Prohibiting Certain Transactions with Respect to Panama, revoked in 1990.   President George H.W. Bush Aug. 2, 1990: Blocking Iraqi Government Property and Prohibiting Transactions with Iraq, revoked in 2004. Sept. 30, 1990: Continuation of Export Control Regulations, revoked in 1993. Nov. 16, 1990: Chemical and Biological Weapons Proliferation, revoked in 1994. Oct. 4, 1991: Prohibiting Certain Transactions with Respect to Haiti, revoked in 1994. May 30, 1992: Blocking 'Yugoslav Government' Property and Property of the Governments of Serbia and Montenegro, revoked in 2003. President Bill Clinton Sept. 26, 1993: Prohibiting Certain Transactions Involving UNITA, revoked in 2003. Sept. 30, 1993: Measures to Restrict the Participation by United States Persons in Weapons Proliferation Activities, revoked in 1994. June 30, 1994: Continuation of Export Control Regulations, revoked in 1994. Aug. 19, 1994: Continuation of Export Control Regulations, revoked in 2001. Sept. 29, 1994: Measures to Restrict the Participation by United States Persons in Weapons Proliferation Activities, revoked in 1994. Oct. 25, 1994: Blocking Property and Additional Measures With Respect to the Bosnian Serb- Controlled Areas of the Republic of Bosnia and Herzegovina, revoked in 2003. Nov. 14, 1994 (still in effect): Proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction, continued in November 2018. Jan. 23, 1995 (still in effect): Prohibiting Transactions with Terrorists Who Threaten to Disrupt the Middle East Peace Process, continued in January 2018. March 15, 1995 (still in effect): Prohibiting Certain Transactions with Respect to the Development of Iranian Petroleum Resources, continued in March 2018 and expanded in August 2018. Oct. 21, 1995 (still in effect): Blocking Assets and Prohibiting Transactions with Significant Narcotics Traffickers, continued in October 2018. March 1, 1996 (still in effect): Regulation of the Anchorage and Movement of Vessels with Respect to Cuba, modified by President Obama in 2016 and again by President Trump in February 2018. May 22, 1997: Prohibiting New Investment in Burma, terminated in October 2016. Nov. 3, 1997 (still in effect): Blocking Sudanese Government Property and Prohibiting Transactions with Sudan, continued in October 2018. June 9, 1998: Blocking Property of the Governments of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (Serbia and Montenegro), the Republic of Serbia, and the Republic of Montenegro, and Prohibiting New Investment in the Republic of Serbia in Response to the Situation in Kosovo, revoked in 2003. July 4, 1999: Blocking Property and Prohibiting Transactions with the Taliban, revoked in 2002. June 21, 2000: Blocking Property of the Government of the Russian Federation Relating to the Disposition of Highly Enriched Uranium Extracted from Nuclear Weapons, expired in 2012. Jan. 18, 2001: Prohibiting the Importation of Rough Diamonds from Sierra Leone, revoked in 2004. President George W. Bush June 26, 2001 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Persons Who Threaten International Stabilization Efforts in the Western Balkans, continued in June 2018. Aug. 17, 2001 (still in effect): Continuation of Export Control Regulations, continued August 2018. Sept. 14, 2001 (still in effect): Declaration of National Emergency by Reason of Certain Terrorist Attacks, continued in September 2018. Sept. 23, 2001 (still in effect): Blocking Property and Prohibiting Transactions with Persons who Commit, Threaten to Commit, or Support Terrorism, continued in September 2017. March 6, 2003 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Persons Undermining Democratic Processes or Institutions in Zimbabwe, continued in March 2018. May 22, 2003 (still in effect): Protecting the Development Fund for Iraq and Certain Other Property in Which Iraq has an Interest, continued in May 2018. May 11, 2004 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Certain Persons and Prohibiting the Export of Certain Goods to Syria, continued in May 2018. July 22, 2004: Blocking Property of Certain Persons and Prohibiting the Importation of Certain Goods from Liberia, revoked in November 2015. Feb. 7, 2006: Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Conflict in Côte d'Ivoire, terminated in September 2016. June 16, 2006 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Certain Persons Undermining Democratic Processes or Institutions in Belarus, continued in June 2018. Oct. 27, 2006 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, continued in October 2018. Aug. 1, 2007 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Persons Undermining the Sovereignty of Lebanon or Its Democratic Processes and Institutions, continued in July 2018. June 26, 2008 (still in effect): Continuing Certain Restrictions With Respect to North Korea and North Korean Nationals, continued in October 2018. President Barack Obama Oct. 23, 2009: Declaration of a National Emergency With Respect to the 2009 H1N1 Influenza Pandemic was never terminated or continued. April 12, 2010 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Conflict in Somalia, continued in 2018. Feb. 25, 2011 (still in effect): Blocking Property and Prohibiting Certain Transactions Related to Libya, continued in February 2018. July 24, 2011 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Transnational Criminal Organizations, continued in July 2018. May 16, 2012 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Persons Threatening the Peace, Security, or Stability of Yemen, continued in May 2012. June 25, 2012: Blocking Property of the Government of the Russian Federation Relating to the Disposition of Highly Enriched Uranium Extracted from Nuclear Weapons, revoked in 2015. March 6, 2014 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Ukraine, continued in March 2018. April 3, 2014 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Certain Persons With Respect to South Sudan, continued in March 2018. May 12, 2014 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Conflict in the Central African Republic, continued in May 2018. March 8, 2015 (still in effect): Blocking Property and Suspending Entry of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Venezuela, continued in March 2018. April 1, 2015 (still in effect): Blocking the Property of Certain Persons Engaging in Significant Malicious Cyber-Enabled Activities, continued in March 2018. Nov. 22, 2015 (still in effect): Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Burundi, continued in November 2018. President Donald Trump Dec. 20, 2017: Blocking the Property of Persons Involved in Serious Human Rights Abuse or Corruption. Sept. 12, 2018: Imposing Certain Sanctions in the Event of Foreign Interference in a United States Election. Nov. 27, 2018: Blocking Property of Certain Persons Contributing to the Situation in Nicaragua.
  • When he made the announcement he was declaring a national emergency, President Donald Trump said he expected to be sued over the move. So far, a handful of activists and even state attorneys general have said they are looking at taking the president to court or have filed a lawsuit already.  Take a look at the lawsuits that are currently pending or will soon be filed. Public Citizen Public Citizen is an advocacy group that filed a suit Friday after the president’s Rose Garden announcement. The group is filing on behalf of three Texas landowners and an environmental group to block the emergency decree. The suit was filed in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., The Washington Post reported. >>Read: Can Congress repeal the national emergency declaration? Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington hasn’t filed suit directly on Trump but instead is suing the Justice Department, claiming documents were not provided, including legal opinions and communications, related to Trump’s decision, USA Today reported. The group is using a Freedom of Information Act request submitted concerning the proposed border barrier. Center for Biological Diversity Center for Biological Diversity is an environmental group. It claims the president did not identify a legal authority to declare the emergency. The group said the wall will block wildlife from its natural habitat “and could result in the extirpation of jaguars, ocelots and other endangered species within the United States,” according to the Post. >>Read: Trump signs funding bill to avoid government shutdown, declares emergency to build border wall American Civil Liberties Union The ACLU has not yet filed but is preparing a suit that says that Trump can’t redirect the money paid by taxpayers unless it is for construction that directly supports the military, the Post reported. ACLU officials said the suit will be filed early this week, saying, “There is no emergency. Members of Congress from both parties, security experts, and Americans who live at the border have all said so. What the president is doing is yet another illegal and dangerous power grab in the service of his anti-immigrant agenda.” The group called the declaration an “abuse of power” and says it “violates the constitutional checks and balances that protect us.” >>Read the latest from our Washington Insider Jamie Dupree The ACLU is using the president’s own words against him from when he said, “I didn’t need to do this, but I’d rather do it much faster.” >> Read more trending news  California attorney general Xavier Becerra, the attorney general of California, will be joined by New Mexico, Oregon, Minnesota, New Jersey, Hawaii and Connecticut in trying to stop the emergency declaration from proceeding. >>Read: National emergency likely to be blocked by courts, DOJ tells White House: reports “We’re confident there are at least 8 billion ways that we can prove harm. And once we are all clear, all the different states are clear, what pots of money that taxpayers sent to D.C. he’s going to raid, which Congress dedicated to different types of services -- whether it’s emergency response services or whether it’s fires or mudslides in California or maybe tornadoes and floods in other parts of the country or whether it’s our military men and women and their families who live on military installations that might -- that might have money taken away from them, or whether it’s money taken away from drug interdiction efforts in places like California, a number of states, and certainly Americans, will be harmed. And we’re all going to be prepared,” Becerra said on ABC News’ “This Week.”  >>Read: Trump's border wall: What is a national emergency? A spokesperson for the attorney general of Colorado, Phil Weiser, said his state will also be joining the suit, KDVR reported. The spokesperson said Weiser decided that the state will be hurt if money is transferred from military installations to the wall, according to KDVR.
  • At the same time President Donald Trump was making a Rose Garden announcement Friday declaring a national emergency to fund a wall along the country’s southern border, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer announced they would fight Trump’s declaration “using every remedy available.” >> Read more trending news Pelosi and Schumer did not lay out specific remedies they might employ to stop the president from diverting funds from other projects to use to construct a border wall, but several Democrats members of Congress have promised a joint resolution of disapproval aimed at repealing the declaration and stopping Trump’s plans. Would Congress be successful in passing a resolution that would hamper the president’s bid to fund border security by declaring a national emergency? It’s possible, but not likely. >>Trump's border wall: What is a national emergency? Here’s a look at what could happen. A resolution of disapprovalCongress could approve a resolution that contests the status of the national emergency Trump has declared. They can do so under the National Emergencies Act of 1976. The resolution, if passed, would stop the plan to divert money from other government programs to build the border wall. The resolution could pass with a simple majority vote in the House and Senate – 218 votes in the House and 51 in the Senate. There is a Democrat majority in the House where a resolution could easily pass. There are 48 Democrat members of the Senate. Democrats would need four Republicans to vote with them to pass a joint resolution. Reps. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-New York, have said they will introduce a bill in the House to block the declaration. By Friday afternoon, Castro told The Washington Post he had gathered more than 60 co-sponsors for the resolution. Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Illinois, told ABC's “This Week” that she believes the Senate has enough votes for such a resolution. 'I think we do,' she said. 'Now, whether we have enough for an override and veto, that's a different story. But frankly, I think there's enough people in the Senate who are concerned that what he's doing is robbing from the military and the DOD to go build this wall.' If a resolution should pass both chambers of Congress, it would go to the president’s desk for a signature. The president would almost certainly veto the resolution, marking the first time in his term he has used the veto power. If he does veto the resolution, it would go back to Congress where it would require a two-thirds vote in both the House and the Senate to override the veto. In the House, 290 votes would be needed. In the Senate, the number would be 67. A lawsuit – or several of them The president has broad powers under the National Emergencies Act, so until the provisions of Trump’s declaration are made public, it’s unclear what someone could sue him over concerning the declaration. But sued he will be -- some suits are already in the works  -- and here is where those suits could come from: Congress: It’s likely that House Democrats would sue on grounds that the president overreached his powers by bypassing the power Congress has to control funding for government programs and projects. However, Democrats in Congress would have to first establish that they have the right to sue the White House, and that can be difficult since the president was given the authority to declare a national emergency under the National Emergencies Act in 1976. The House could challenge Trump's definition of an emergency, but the definition in the National Emergency Act is vague, leaving what is a national emergency pretty much up to the president. Activist groups: The American Civil Liberties Union said on Friday it plans to sue the president over what they call his “unconstitutional power grab that hurts American communities.” Landowners: Those who own land along the area where the president has proposed a border wall could file suit over the seizure of their property if that happens. However, the government is generally allowed to buy up private property for public use – such as when privately-held land is taken to make room for a freeway. The practice is called eminent domain. It is often an uphill fight for landowners. States: California Attorney General Xavier Becerra has promised that he will file a suit against the White House claiming that his state will be harmed if Trump diverts funds from other projects to build a wall. He said that four other states, New Mexico, Oregon, Hawaii and Minnesota will join his state in the pending lawsuit.Nevada’s attorney general has also threatened a suit.
  • A baby made its entry to the world on a flight to Florida. USA Today reported that, according to JetBlue Airways spokeswoman Jen Dang, the “youngest customer to date” was born on a two hour, 50 minute flight from San Juan, Puerto Rico, to Fort Lauderdale, Florida, Friday. >> Read more trending news  'We’d like to thank the crew and medical professionals on board for their quick action under pressure, and wish the new mother and son all the best,” Deng told WTVJ. “Flight 1954 was operated on aircraft N523JB, coincidentally named, ‘Born to Be Blue.’” According to a tweet from JetBlue, the baby boy was given shower gifts and can expect more to come.
  • An Oklahoma City shelter owner took in a dog with a unique appearance, and is raising awareness about rescue dogs with special needs in the process. Mutt Misfits Animal Rescue Society owner Heather Hernandez knew she wanted to take in the gray-brown dog named Toad, according to KFOR. She was born with two mouths. One is where an ear should be.  >> Read more trending news  “We realized immediately she was different,” Hernandez told KFOR. “Obviously, the way she looks but, her personality and her bond to me and my family, it was just so immediate.” >> Need something to lift your spirits? Read more uplifting news  The dog also has a misaligned face and limited vision and hearing, and her second mouth has teeth and salivates. Hernandez has to clean the second mouth nightly, because the drool can stick to her fur. “Her primary veterinarian thinks that maybe she absorbed a twin in utero and so that’s kind of how the deformity surfaced,” Hernandez said. “The main teeth, the ones you see primarily, they are connected to her skull, so we leave them.” It was Toad that inspired Hernandez to start the non profit shelter, KOCO reported Hernandez wants to bring awareness to animals that have special needs, and in starting rescue, helps pets that are otherwise overlooked. Hernandez said her shelter is completely run by volunteers and has no paid staff members. Hernandez said Toad is expected to have some complications as she gets older because of her face alignment, but she is otherwise living a normal life. “Toad came into my life at the exact time that I needed her, and she has brought me infinite joy and happiness,” she said. More photos of Toad can be found at her Instagram page, toadsearmouth. Information on Mutt Misfits Animal Rescue Society can be found on the organization’s Facebook page.
  • A man visiting Madame Tussauds in Times Square apparently had a beef with one of the wax figures at the tourist attraction. The man, for whom police are looking, first started yelling at the wax likeness of Sean Combs, also known as P.Diddy, before he knocked over the figure, making the head fall off, then stomped on it, WNBC reported. >> Read more trending news  The man then left the museum. It all happened around 8:45 p.m. Saturday, The Associated Press reported. Police were still looking for the suspect on Monday, according to the AP. The statue was unveiled in 2009, the AP reported.
  • Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld last week became the first Republican to announce plans to challenge President Donald Trump for the 2020 Republican presidential nomination. >> Read more trending news Weld, 73, announced Friday that he’d formed a presidential exploratory committee, a move that enabled him to raise money for a White House run. 'We cannot sit passively as our precious democracy slips quietly into the darkness,” Weld said in his announcement, according to The Washington Post. “Congress must do its duty, and as citizens we must do ours.” Here are some things to know about Weld: Weld was born on July 31, 1946, in Smithtown, New York. According to the Justice Department, Weld’s father was a partner in the family’s investment banking firm on Wall Street. Weld graduated from Harvard College in 1966 with his bachelor’s degree and went on to study at economics at University College, Oxford, before graduating from Harvard Law School with his juris doctorate in 1970. After graduation, he launched a private practice in Boston and, in 1973, became involved in the Watergate scandal when he was hired by the House Impeachment Committee as counsel to research the legal grounds for impeachment. President Ronald Reagan appointed Weld to serve as U.S. Attorney for the District of Massachusetts from 1981 to 1986, when he left to become assistant attorney general of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division. He held that role until 1988. Weld was elected in 1990 to serve as the 68th governor of Massachusetts. He was reelected once, in 1994. Weld has run for office several times since 1994. In 1996, he made an unsuccessful run for a seat in the U.S. Senate before returning to private practice. He ran for the Republican nomination for governor of New York in 2005, but he failed to secure the nomination. In 2016, Weld was the Libertarian Party’s nominee for vice president on a ticket headed by Gary Johnson. Weld and his wife, Leslie Marshall, live in Canton, Massachusetts. Weld has five children from a previous marriage and three step-children.
  • Police say someone attacked a statue of Sean 'Diddy' Combs at Madame Tussauds wax museum in New York, shoving the rap impresario's likeness so forcefully it lost its head. Investigators were continuing Monday to look for a suspect in the strange episode Saturday night. Police say a man entered the museum near Times Square around 8:45 p.m., went to the statue and knocked it to the ground. The head fell off as the figure toppled. Madame Tussauds New York says artists will fix the damage as quickly as possible to get the figure back to the museum's A-List Party Room. General Manager Tom Middleton notes that Madame Tussauds doesn't rope off its statues so 'guests can interact respectfully' with them. Combs attended his statue's unveiling in 2009.