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    Law enforcement officials said Friday they might never know the motive for a female shooter's violent rampage that killed three people and wounded three at a sprawling Maryland warehouse before she turned the gun on herself. It's little consolation for grieving relatives and others trying to find answers. The suspect, 26-year-old Snochia Moseley of Baltimore County, had been diagnosed with some kind of mental illness in 2016 but had legally purchased the handgun she carried in the deadly Thursday morning attack, Harford County Sheriff Jeffrey Gahler told reporters a day after the violence. But he said what ultimately triggered the workplace shooting is still a mystery and may remain so. 'Frankly, when someone does something like this, such violence against other human beings, we're never going to make sense of it or understand it fully,' the sheriff said at a Friday press conference. Law enforcement officials said the particulars of Moseley's mental illness history would not have flagged her from purchasing a gun in Maryland, where buyers cannot pass a background check if they were either involuntarily committed for any period of time or voluntarily admitted to a psychiatric facility for at least 30 consecutive days. A family friend of one of the victims killed in the shooting at the drugstore distribution center in Aberdeen, Maryland, said the immigrant family from Nepal was utterly wracked with despair and confounded as to how a person with a history of mental illness had a gun in the first place. 'They cannot understand how this could happen. In Nepal, there are very few homicides. They are asking: 'How did this person access a gun?' said Harry Bhandari, a community leader and candidate for state delegate who has known 41-year-old Brindra Giri's family for about 10 years. Giri, a mother of two, had only recently moved to the U.S. from her homeland of Nepal to join her husband, an employee of a local liquor store. Authorities on Friday identified her as one of the three people killed when Moseley, a temp employee, opened fired at the Rite Aid facility. The county sheriff told reporters that Moseley had become increasingly agitated in recent weeks, and relatives had been concerned for her well-being. She used a 9 mm Glock that she legally purchased in March to fire a total of 13 rounds Thursday morning and died after shooting herself in the head. Gahler identified the three people Moseley fatally shot as Giri; Hayleen Reyes, a 41-year-old woman from Baltimore; and Sunday Aguda, a 45-year-old man from Baltimore County. He identified the wounded survivors as Hassan Mitchell, a 19-year-old man from Harford County; Wilfredo Villegas, a 45-year-old man from Montgomery County; and Acharya Purna, a 45-year-old man from New York. Moseley had been hired for the holiday season and had been working there for less than two weeks, according to Gahler. She entered the building at 6:30 a.m. As people lined up to come in the building, Gahler said she cut in line and words were exchanged, but it was a 'little incident.' She left around 7:21 a.m. Moseley, who had worked security jobs in the past, drove to her White Marsh home and got a handgun, pepper spray and handcuffs. She arrived back at the parking lot around 8:35 a.m. and entered the front door around 8:52 a.m. She pulled a hooded shirt over her head and began shooting, striking and killing Aguda outside the building, according to Gahler. Inside, where there were about 65 people, she fatally shot Giri and Reyes and also shot Mitchell, Villegas and Purna, who survived. She shot herself twice before police arrived, he said — once with a grazing wound and then with the fatal shot. She was already down when officers arrived and an officer moved her from the scene, not knowing that she was the shooter. When asked how Moseley could legally buy a gun after being diagnosed with a mental illness, officials said it had not been determined that she had a 'propensity for violence to self or others.' The shooting sent survivors screaming and running in all directions. Bhandari said Giri was trampled in the chaos before getting shot. When the shooter shot herself, others helped the wounded before authorities arrived. The attack came nearly three months after a man with a shotgun attacked a newspaper office in Annapolis, Maryland, killing five staff members. Authorities accused Jarrod W. Ramos of attacking The Capital Gazette because of a longstanding grudge against the paper. It came less than a year after a fatal workplace shooting less than 10 miles (16 kilometers) from the warehouse, in which five were shot, three fatally. The Maryland attack also came on the heels of workplace shootings this week in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania. Harford County Executive Barry Glassman said that, unfortunately, shootings like this are 'becoming a too-often occurrence' in the nation. ___ Associated Press writers Sarah Rankin Richmond, Virginia, and Sarah Brumfield in Washington contributed to this report. .
  • Gray muck is flowing into the Cape Fear River from the site of a dam breach at a Wilmington power plant Friday where an old coal ash dump had been covered over by Florence's floodwaters. Duke Energy spokeswoman Paige Sheehan said Friday the utility doesn't believe the breach at the L.V. Sutton Power Station poses a significant threat of increased flooding to nearby communities. The potential environmental threat was unclear. No environmental regulators were at the scene, with officials citing unsafe conditions. Floodwaters breached several points early Friday in the earthen dam at Sutton Lake, the plant's 1,100-acre (445-hectare) reservoir. Lake water then flooded one of three large coal ash dumps lining the lakeshore. Sheehan said the company can't rule out that ash might be escaping the flooded dump and flowing through the lake into the river. The ash left over when coal is burned to generate electricity contains mercury, lead, arsenic and other toxic heavy metals. Duke said Friday the inundated basin at the plant contains about 400,000 cubic yards (305,820 cubic meters) of ash. The area received more than 30 inches (75 centimeters) of rain from former Hurricane Florence, with the Cape Fear River still rising Friday and expected to crest Sunday and remain at flood stage through early next week. Gray material the company characterized as 'coal combustion byproducts' could be seen floating in the lake and river. Earthjustice, an environmental advocacy group with a boat in the river, provided The Associated Press with images Friday showing wide gray slicks in the water. A team member plucked a turtle from the muck and rinsed it off. 'Any big spill like this raises concerns about the impacts on the estuary ecosystem in the lower Cape Fear River,' said Pete Harrison, a staff attorney with Earthjustice on the boat. 'This is Duke's third coal ash spill in the aftermath of Hurricane Florence, and it looks like it's the biggest yet.' North Carolina's top environmental regulator said the possible environmental harm isn't yet known. No state inspectors had arrived by late Friday, though officials said they would be there as soon as conditions are considered safe for personnel to navigate the river and be onsite. 'What we don't know at this point is if any coal ash has filtered into the Cape Fear River,' said Mike Regan, secretary for the state Department of Environmental Quality, at a news conference in Raleigh. 'We plan to conduct flyovers.' Environmental Protection Agency regional administrator Trey Glenn said his staff was monitoring the situation at Sutton from the state Emergency Operations Center in Raleigh, about 150 miles (240 kilometers) northwest of the Sutton plant. He said dozens of EPA staff were scattered throughout the region impacted by Florence, checking on toxic waste sites and oil storage facilities. 'EPA serves in a support role to the impacted states and has offered assistance to North Carolina to help them respond to the reported Sutton coal ash incident,' Glenn said. 'As of this evening, North Carolina has not requested additional support.' With no regulators at the Sutton plant, it was left to Duke employees to collect water samples that would be tested in the company's in-house lab. Environmental groups also collected samples from the river that would be sent to a private lab. Security personnel for Duke blocked access Friday to Sutton Lake Road, leading to a public dock on the reservoir, a popular boating and fishing site. Duke denied a request for an Associated Press reporter to cross the barricade, saying the lake situation 'continues to change' and is 'not safe.' Sutton Lake is the former cooling pond for a coal-fired plant Duke retired in 2013 and replaced with a new generating station running off natural gas. Duke said that power plant was shut down overnight and all employees safely evacuated. The breach at the Wilmington site is separate from last weekend's reported rupture at a nearby coal ash landfill, which spilled enough material to fill 180 dump trucks. Duke's ash waste management has faced intense scrutiny since a drainage pipe collapsed under a waste pit at an old plant in Eden in 2014, triggering a massive spill that coated miles (kilometers) of the Dan River in gray sludge. The utility later agreed to plead guilty to nine Clean Water Act violations and pay $102 million in fines and restitution for illegally discharging pollution from ash dumps at five North Carolina power plants. It plans to close all its ash dumps by 2029. At the separate Duke plant near Goldsboro, three old coal-ash dumps capped with soil and trees were underwater Thursday after the Neuse River flooded. Staff from the environmental group Waterkeeper Alliance visited the flooded dumps at the H.F. Lee Power Plant by boat Wednesday, took photographs and collected samples of gray sludge washing into the floodwaters. State environmental regulators visited the site Thursday, but said they were unable to make a full assessment because of high water levels. The Duke spokeswoman Sheehan said any coal ash release at the Goldsboro site appeared 'minimal.' Meanwhile, South Carolina's state-owned utility said it expected floodwaters to enter a coal ash pond at one of its closed power plants. Santee Cooper spokeswoman Mollie Gore said the overtopping of an ash basin at the Granger plant near Conway should not be environmentally significant. Gore said nearly all the ash has been removed from the basin and water pumped in to prevent the dike from breaking. The company had placed a 2 ½-foot (72-centimeter) high inflatable berm around the top of a second pond that has more coal ash in it. She estimates 200,000 tons (181 million kilograms) of ash are in a corner of the pond furthest from the rising Waccamaw River. ___ Associated Press reporter Jeffrey Collins contributed from Columbia, S.C. ___ Biesecker reported from Washington. Follow him at http://twitter.com/mbieseck
  • Benetta White and David Lloyd slogged through waist-deep water filling their yard to escape Hurricane Florence's latest life-threatening punch to a town in the Carolinas. It was their second evacuation in a week. They were among 100 people rescued with helicopters, boats and high-wheeled military vehicles during a six-hour rescue operation in southeastern North Carolina's Bladen County that lasted into Friday morning. Officials in North and South Carolina warn that the flooding danger is far from over, with South Carolina also ordering more evacuations as rivers rise. At least 43 people have died since the hurricane slammed into the coast more than a week ago. White and Lloyd, who live in the North Carolina town of Kelly, were given little time Thursday night to evacuate when the Cape Fear River came rushing onto their property. By the time they loaded their van, the water was waist-high and they had to slog through a foul-smelling soup to get to a neighbor's pickup. From there they went to the town's fire department, and were taken out of town by an Army truck. Now they are staying in a shelter at a Bladen County high school. It's the second time they've evacuated in a week. 'We had to evacuate again, all over again, and got trapped in a bunch of water in a car and almost lost our lives,' she said. The National Guard and U.S. Coast Guard rushed in to help, with aircraft pilots wearing night-vision goggles. The mandatory evacuation issued Thursday for Kelly, population about 800, was the third for the town since the storm began lashing the state more than a week ago. A CH-47 Chinook from the Minnesota National Guard's 211th Aviation Regiment was wrapping up a 12-hour shift Thursday evening when they began hearing about stranded residents. It soon became clear that they were needed. 'So at that point it was game on,' said Chief Warrant Officer 3 Tom Knutson of St. Cloud, Minnesota, in an interview Friday. Knutson said his helicopter made a landing at a church about 9:45 p.m. where there was barely enough room to put down the aircraft. 'We were loading up men, women, children, elderly, pets, law enforcement personnel, rescue personnel,' said Knutson, describing the situation as chaotic. 'We understand that a lot of them are losing their houses,' said Sgt. Derek Vollmer of St. Cloud, another crew member, adding those rescued 'seemed very thankful.' Around the state since the storm hit last week, first responders have performed about 5,000 rescues so far, Gov. Roy Cooper said. 'We are eternally grateful to our first responders, who continue to show unflinching courage in the face of danger,' Cooper said. He warned flooding would continue into next week, meaning 'that lives are still at risk.' Cooper's sentiments were echoed by South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster, who said Friday: 'Although the winds are gone and the rain is not falling, the water is still there and the worst is still to come.' The South Carolina governor estimated damage from the flood in his state at $1.2 billion. In a letter he said the flooding will be the worst disaster in the state's modern history. McMaster asked congressional leaders to hurry federal aid. Speaking in Las Vegas, President Donald Trump said South Carolina is in for a 'tough one' as floodwaters continue to rise. 'They got hit, but the big hit comes days later and it will be the biggest they've ever had,' said Trump, who visited North and South Carolina this week. Environmental concerns were also continuing to mount. Duke Energy said a dam containing a large lake at Wilmington power plant had been breached by floodwaters from Florence, and it was possible that coal ash from an adjacent dump was flowing into the Cape Fear River. Kevin Tovornik was scrambling to prepare for flooding in Conway, South Carolina. He loaded all of his furniture into a borrowed flatbed hay trailer and took it to a warehouse where space was being donated to possible flood victims. Tovornik's neighborhood already flooded early Monday because of Florence's heavy rain. He lost his wife's car. Tovornik wanted to go back to his house on Friday for more preparations, but with bridges starting closing all around Conway because of floodwaters, the few open roads were jammed. He had gone half a mile (800 meters) in an hour. He heard friends stuck in traffic Thursday night for four hours. 'This is ridiculous. This is the worst I've ever seen, and that includes hurricane evacuations,' Tovornik said. ___ Waggoner and Robertson reported from Raleigh, N.C. Also contributing to this report were Associated Press writers Jeffrey Collins in Columbia, South Carolina; Meg Kinnard in Galivants Ferry, South Carolina; Jay Reeves in Birmingham, Alabama and Michael Biesecker in Washington. ___ For the latest on Hurricane Florence, visit https://www.apnews.com/tag/Hurricanes
  • The recent eruption of Hawaii's Kilauea volcano has quieted to the point that federal officials are ready to allow people back to the dramatically changed summit crater, which has quadrupled in size, lost all of its lava and collapsed downward so far that the Empire State Building could now fit inside. Hawaii Volcanoes National Park will reopen its main gates Saturday. Officials are bracing for long lines and crammed roads as visitors flock to see Kilauea's new landscape and the area where a well-known lava lake once bubbled. The reopening also coincides with National Public Lands Day, so admission is free. 'We are projecting well over 5,000 people just in one day,' Hawaii Volcanoes National Park acting spokeswoman Shanelle Saunders said. While interest is high, accommodations will be somewhat limited. Damage to the park closed about 30 percent of its former parking capacity. 'We're really expecting long lines, and we hope people have plenty of patience when they're trying to get parking spaces,' Saunders said. There's still no access to clean drinking water in the park, and the summit's Jaggar Museum remains closed, she added. The national park — normally the state's most-visited tourist attraction — has been closed for 135 days as volcanic activity caused explosive eruptions, earthquakes and the collapse of the famed Halemaumau crater. Ash clouds shot skyward from the summit crater and blanketed the region in volcanic debris. Kilauea has been active for decades. But the eruption that began in May has transformed both the park and the rural Big Island coastline that surrounds it. Outside the park, lava flows consumed entire neighborhoods, filled an ocean bay and created miles of new shoreline with fresh black sand beaches and jagged rocky outcrops. Inside the park, molten rock drained from the summit lava lake and vanished from view as the landscape underwent a monumental change. The summit crater floor sunk 1,500 feet (460 meters), and the overall Kilauea caldera widened — expanding from about 200 acres to over 1,000 acres, or more than 1 square mile, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. 'This eruption was really unprecedented in the historic record,' Ingrid Johanson, a research geophysicist at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, told The Associated Press in a telephone interview. 'The changes we've seen at the summit are much more dramatic than anything that's happened in the last 200 years.' The crater looks 'completely different,' Johanson said. 'I think people are going to be really awestruck when they see it.' However, one of the park's biggest draws — the radiant red light from the 2,000-degree lava lake that has been a Kilauea hallmark for over a decade — is completely gone. 'There is no glow at all,' Saunders said. 'You can't even see your hand in front your face it's so dark in a lot of these areas. I mean, the stars right now are incredible, but there's actually no flowing lava.' The park will be open 24 hours a day, but visitors should be careful at night because of new cracks in trails and walkways. 'Even if people are really familiar with those trails, they may have changed since they've been here,' Saunders said. Public access to the volcano remains limited because of damage to its infrastructure. But visitors can once again hike around some parts of the summit area and see the aftermath of the historic eruption. 'The crater rim trail is open to a certain point,' Saunders said. 'And from there, they can see down into the crater itself.' The theme of this year's National Public Lands Day is 'resilience and restoration,' said Hawaii Volcanoes National Park spokeswoman Jessica Ferracane, who noted that park repair work had been pointing toward a late-September reopening. 'We really wanted to invite visitors back without them having to pay on that first day,' Ferracane said. 'The theme was so uncanny that we thought it would be a real good fit.' Regardless of when the park reopened, officials expected big crowds. 'If we reopened on a Monday in the middle of the school year, it would still be busy because people really want to come in and come back to the park,' she said. While volcanic activity has slowed significantly in the past month and no lava is reaching the surface at Kilauea, scientists aren't ready to declare the latest eruption over. 'There is still material that could feed into an eruption,' Johanson said. 'I definitely expect that lava will return one day.
  • For the second year in a row, the life expectancy of Americans got shorter. >> Read more trending news  According to the latest report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, the overall life expectancy in the U.S. was 78.6 years, down .1 from the previous year. Men can expect to live 76.1 years, down from 76.3. Women held steady at 81.1 years. During the 20th century, advances in medications and other treatments were responsible for dramatic increases in how long people lived. But deaths from drug overdoses, chronic liver disease, suicide, Alzheimer’s and blood infections (septicemia) have all gone up, resulting in a shortened average life span. >> Related: Just one drink a day can shorten life expectancy, study suggests Heart disease and cancer still kill most Americans, but they weren’t the reason people are dying younger. In fact, deaths from heart disease have been declining. Between 2006 and 2016, however, death rates from drug overdoses increased 72 percent and suicides increased 23 percent.  So who lives longest? According to the report, Hispanics had the highest life expectancy at 81.8 years. Non-Hispanic whites were next, with 78.5 years, followed by non-Hispanic blacks, with 74.8 years. Where you live can also affect how long you can expect to live.  >> Related: U.S. sees drop in life expectancy, largely due to opioid crisis among young adults Areas in the bottom 25 percent of the report had four things in common: Most of the people were less educated, low income and predominantly black, and they were in the South. The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, which worked with the CDC on the report, created a calculator to determine the life expectancy of an area.  The average life span for Georgians, according to the calculator, was 77.40 years. If you live in Gwinnett County, though, you get an extra 3.18 years. Cobb County residents are looking at 80.08 years on Earth, but those in DeKalb County get only 79.14. >> Related: Have we reached the limit of human life expectancy? The area with the lowest life expectancy in the U.S. was Stilwell, Oklahoma, where people averaged 56.3 years. Where do people live longest? Chatham, North Carolina. Residents of this higher-income area could expect to be around until they reach 97.5 years old. 
  • The East Coast is no stranger to hurricanes and the destruction that follows. The Saffir-Simpson scale was developed to help determine damage and flooding before it strikes.   What is a hurricane?  A hurricane is a rotating low-pressure weather system that converts the energy of warm air into winds and waves. Hurricanes have “warm core” centers, meaning the center of the storm is warmer than the surrounding air. Warm ocean temperatures and wind patterns that spiral air inward are necessary for a hurricane to form.>>How to use the internet during the storm when your internet is down The “eye” of the storm is produced as the warm air rises in the storm’s center and a center of low pressure is created. When the pressure in that area drops, more air is pulled in, creating a sort of heat-pump effect that causes the storm to repeat the process and grow in intensity. The storm will continue to do so until it’s supply of warm water is interrupted. Thunderstorms spiral out from the eye and the water is pushed ahead of the storm, building what is called a 'storm surge.' The storm surge forms to the east of the eye. >>What is a storm surge and why is it dangerous? When a system has sustained winds of 39 mph, it is classified as a tropical depression. When the winds reach 39 mph or higher, the depression becomes a tropical storm and is given a name.  At 74 mph, the system is a hurricane.  What is the Saffir-Simpson scale and what does it have to do with hurricanes?  The tropical system is assigned a category depending on its wind speed. Here are the categories, the wind speeds and what those winds will likely do once the system makes landfall: >>What is the Saffir-Simpson scale; how does it work; is there a Category 6?  Category 1 -- 74 to 95 mph: Very dangerous winds will produce some damage. Well-constructed frame homes could have damage to the roof, shingles, vinyl siding and gutters. Large branches of trees will snap and shallowly rooted trees may be toppled. Extensive damage to power lines and poles likely will result in power outages that could last a few to several days.  Category 2 -- 96 to 110 mph: Extremely dangerous winds will cause extensive damage: Well-constructed frame homes could sustain major roof and siding damage. Many shallowly-rooted trees will be snapped or uprooted and block numerous roads. Near-total power loss is expected with outages that could last from several days to weeks.  Category 3 -- 111-129 mph: Devastating damage will occur: Well-built framed homes may incur major damage or removal of roof decking and gable ends. Many trees will be snapped or uprooted, blocking numerous roads. Electricity and water will be unavailable for several days to weeks after the storm passes. Category 3 storms and above are considered major hurricanes.  Category 4 -- 130-156 mph: Catastrophic damage will occur. Well-built framed homes can sustain severe damage with loss of most of the roof structure and/or some exterior walls. Most trees will be snapped or uprooted and power poles downed. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.  Category 5 -- 157 mph or higher: Catastrophic damage will occur. A high percentage of framed homes will be destroyed, with total roof failure and walls collapsing. Fallen trees and power poles will isolate residential areas. Power outages will last for weeks to possibly months. Most of the area will be uninhabitable for weeks or months.   Here is a video that shows the increasing level of damage in each category.  
  • A hurricane leaves a path of destruction and many are left trying to figure out how to begin the chore of cleaning up and repairing their property.  >> Read more trending news  Insurance companies will send claims teams to the affected areas after the event so that customers can get the process of filing a claim started and get the money to repair their property in a timely manner.  Here is a step-by-step guide on how to file an insurance claim following a hurricane or flood:  1. It is important to file the claim with your insurer as soon as possible. Thousands of people will be filing claims, and you want to get yours as high as you can on the list.  2. The Insurance Information Institute, an organization that provides information on insurance issues, suggests you make temporary repairs to your home if they are needed to protect it from further damage. Save the receipts for supplies so you can turn them in for reimbursement.  3. Once you are able to speak to an insurer, you will need to ask these questions: Is the damage you described covered under the terms of your policy? How long do you have to file a claim? How long will it take to process the claim? Do you need estimates for repairs? 4. This step is very important: Once you make the claim, be sure to write down the claim number. Again, insurers will be dealing with thousands of people -- make it easy for them to communicate with you about your claim by having the claim number written down where you can find it. 5. When you speak to your insurer, record the day and time of the conversation and with whom you spoke. Take notes about what is said and if any monetary amounts are mentioned. 6. You need to be ready to provide an accurate description of damages to your insurer. If you can safely do it, walk around your home and make notes on what was damaged.  7. After you contact them, your insurance company with send you a “proof of loss” form to complete or will send an adjuster – a person trained to assess the damage to property – to your home to get the information on your losses. To speed this process along, start gathering information about your property and the items that were lost or destroyed. A proof of loss form will ask you to describe the items damaged or destroyed, provide the approximate date of purchase and estimate the cost to repair it or replace it. If you happen to be able to produce receipts for items, that would be a help as well. 8. Another step you can take to document what was damaged is to photograph or videotape the damage. Be sure to point out structural damage in the photos or video. 9. Do not throw out damaged items. You want an adjuster to see them first. 10. If you are unable to live in your home and must stay elsewhere, keep all receipts for any living expenses – hotel rooms, food, and other costs of evacuation. Most homeowner policies that cover windstorm damage will cover those costs. 11. Be wary of anyone who comes to your door offering to do repairs or claiming to be insurance adjusters.  12. If you have no insurance, you can register for federal disaster relief at DisasterAssistance.gov. You do that by downloading the FEMA mobile app or by calling 1-800-621-3362.  Disaster assistance can help with temporary housing, home repairs and other disaster-related expenses, including crisis counseling and legal assistance. Click here for more information on FEMA aid. Water vs. wind: What is covered? Hurricanes cause wind and water damage. Homeowners insurance covers these hazards in a different way.  >>Does insurance cover hail damage to your car, house? Homeowners insurance does not cover flood damage – including flooding that is caused by storm surge. You would have needed to have flood insurance to pay for damages caused by water beforehand. Structures or belongings that were damaged by flooding are covered only by flood insurance. Wind damage is not covered in some coastal states. You would have had to purchase a separate windstorm policy in advance, which is a common thing in those coastal states. Both North Carolina and South Carolina are states where insurance companies can charge special deductibles for wind damage. Damage to your car is generally covered by your automobile insurance. Finally, be patient. It may take a while for someone to get to you and assess your damages.    
  • While much attention is placed on storm preparedness, the period just after a natural disaster can be particularly dangerous. Weary residents who are eager to return to their homes are at increased risk for a variety of life-threatening situations, including carbon monoxide poisoning, electrocution, mold exposure and food poisoning. The following tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will help keep you and your family safe. >> Read more trending news  Be aware of fallen electrical wires and avoid coming in contact with them.  Don't use any electrical appliance that has become wet, and don't operate an electric tool or appliance while standing in water.  If you smell gas, leave the premises immediately and call 911. Place generators, charcoal grills, camp stoves and other fuel-burning devices outside and away from open doors, windows and air vents to prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. Wear waterproof boots and gloves to prevent floodwater from touching your skin. If skin comes in contact with floodwater, clean promptly. For hands, a gel with alcohol in it can be used if clean water is not available. It's imperative to act quickly to prevent mold. Fix leaks and remove water-logged items that cannot be saved from the home. When removing mold, never mix bleach and ammonia because the fumes from the mixture can be lethal. Until the water supply is declared safe by local officials, use bottled water, disinfect water or boil it before consuming. If a boil water advisory is in effect in your area, do not drink tap water or use it to brush your teeth unless water has come to a rolling boil for at least one minute or is treated with unscented household chlorine bleach. To treat water, add one-quarter teaspoon bleach to 1 gallon of cloudy water or one-eighth teaspoon bleach to 1 gallon of clear water. Stir well and let it stand for 30 minutes before you use it. Do not eat food that smells bad, looks bad or has come in contact with floodwater.  Seek prompt medical attention for any injuries suffered during the return home. Wounds that have been exposed to floodwater require immediate medical attention to prevent tetanus and other infections.
  • A second arrest was made Friday in the death of 2-year-old Jayce Martin police in Orlando, Florida, said. >> Read more trending news  Johnathan Pursglove, 25, was arrested on charges of aggravated manslaughter of a child, police said. He was released on bond Friday. Jayce’s mother, Victoria Toth, 24, was arrested earlier this month on the same charges. Police said Jayce’s death could be considered a “torture case.” An arrest report said that Jayce was malnourished and bruised when police found his body in a home on Bethune Drive in July. They also found fist-sized holes in the bedroom wall, the report said. The arrest report shows that Toth found Jayce unresponsive when she came home from work. Her boyfriend, Pursglove, was at the home with the child. Jayce’s death was ruled a homicide, and his cause of death was peritonitis, which is an inflammation of the lining of the abdomen. The certificate also listed 'blunt force trauma to the abdomen.'Officials said Pursglove admitted he regularly punched holes in walls out of anger, but he did not admit to hitting the child. But, police said Pursglove was also the child’s caregiver and he failed to get the child medical attention. Pursglove has a criminal history, including an arrest for use of a firearm during a 2012  drug deal and accusations of domestic violence.   >> Related: Man gets 160-year sentence for impregnating 10-year-old after repeated molestation An ex-girlfiend said she tried to get a stalking injunction against him earlier this year and referred to past violence when she wrote, 'He has hit and punched me in my stomach. I also fell down stairs and woke up in the hospital.' Pursglove was released from jail after he posted bail, police said. 
  • It’s no secret junk food is bad for your health. In fact, too much of it can increase your risk of several diseases, including cancer, according to a new report. >> Read more trending news  Researchers from health institutions in France recently conducted a study, published in the PLOS journal, to explore the link between cancer and foods that were labeled by the Nutrient Profiling System of the British Food Standards Agency (FSAm-NPS). The model is a five-tier scoring system, which uses colors and grades, to identify foods low or high in fat, saturated fat, salt or sugar. It has been in place in the United Kingdom since 2017 to help regulate food advertising.  For the assessment, the scientists examined data collected from 471,495 participants from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. The participants provided information about their dietary habits and medical history, and they were followed for about 15 years.  >> Related: Sugar causes cancer cells to multiply, study says  After analyzing the results, they found that 49,794 of the subjects had been diagnosed with cancer, with 12,063 having breast cancer, 6,745 having prostate cancer and 5,806 having colorectal cancer. Upon further investigation, they discovered regular consumption of foods with low nutritional quality was associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer and cancer of the upper aerodigestive tract and stomach. Women who ate foods with low nutritional value had a greater risk of being diagnosed with liver and postmenopausal breast cancer, and men who ate poorly had an increase risk of lung cancer.  >> Related: Immune therapy doubles survival for lung cancer patients, study says “In this large multinational European cohort, participants with the highest FSAm-NPS DI scores, i.e., those consuming on average food products with a lower nutritional quality, were at higher risk of developing cancer overall,” the authors wrote in the study.  Despite the results, the analysts did acknowledge their limitations. They said the data the evaluated was self-reported and may not have been fully accurate. However, they noted “this study was the first effort to investigate the association between the FSAm-NPS [Dietary Index] and disease in a large European cohort.” They now hope their findings will encourage policy makers to implement better policies for food labeling.  >> Related: Just one drink a day can increase your risk of cancer, study says  “This [study],” they said, “supports the relevance of the FSAm-NPS as [an] underlying nutrient profiling system for front-of-pack nutrition labels, as well as for other public health nutritional measures.”