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    Beware: A dangerous pest could be lurking in the shadows of your home this summer. According to WOOD-TV, brown recluse spiders are becoming more active as the weather warms up. Here's what you need to know to identify – and avoid – the unwelcome arachnids: >> Read more trending news  1. What do they look like? The nocturnal spiders can be as large as a half-dollar and usually have violin-shaped markings on their upper body.  >> ‘Very aggressive tick,’ whose bite causes red meat allergies not a hoax, CDC says 2. Where are they found? According to Live Science, brown recluses usually live in the southern and central U.S., including the following states: Alabama  Arkansas Georgia Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana  Mississippi Missouri Nebraska Ohio Oklahoma Tennessee Texas They like 'dark, secluded places,' such as in closets or under garbage cans, Live Science reports. They might be lurking in boxes, shoes or clothes in your garage or basement, Holly Schwarting, who works for Kansas State University's Department of Entomology, told KFVS in 2016. >> PHOTOS: 25 ways Florida could kill you 3. Are brown recluses dangerous? While fatalities are rare, you definitely don't want to get bitten by one. 'The brown recluse spider's bite can be kind of a nasty one,' Schwarting told KFVS. 'Their venom contains a material that causes our tissue to break down, so it can create a lesion and a slow-healing wound.' The bite may have a red or purple circle around it, according to MedlinePlus. Bite victims may experience discomfort, chills, itching, nausea, fever and sweating, the site says. Rarely, the bites can cause jaundice, kidney failure, blood in urine, seizures and comas.  You should go to the nearest hospital, call 911 or contact the National Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222 if you think you've been bitten, according to MedlinePlus. 4. How can I protect myself around the house?  Schwarting offered the following tips to KFVS: Wear leather gloves while cleaning Shake out shoes and coats Set up glue traps Pay attention to your surroundings
  • A 22-year-old Fort Meade, Florida, man was killed and two others were injured Monday evening in a shooting during an argument about a dog, the Polk County Sheriff's Office said. >> 2 killed, 2 hospitalized in family fight over stray dog Deputies were called shortly before 6:45 p.m. to a home on Third Street Southwest near South Charleston Avenue and West Broadway Street after a shooting was reported, Sheriff's Office spokesman Brian Bruchey said. Teconsa Tyree McDonald was killed and Calvin Johnson, 30, and Edwin Burgess, 18, were injured in the shooting at the home of 48-year-old Charles Peddycoart, Bruchey said. >> On WFTV.com: Dognapped: Woman investigates, rescues her dog after it was stolen 'The preliminary information – which could change as the investigation progresses – suggests that McDonald, Johnson and Burgess were looking for their dog and knocked on Peddycoart's front door,' he said. 'After opening the door, an argument ensued, and Peddycoart shot all three men in the area of the front porch.' Detectives said they're interviewing Peddycoart. >> Read more trending news  Johnson, McDonald and Burgess were roommates, investigators said. 'McDonald died on scene, and the injured men were transported to an area hospital for surgery, with gunshot wounds to the torso,' Bruchey said. 'Their conditions are unknown at this time.' The shooting remains under investigation. No other details were given.
  • A British pharmaceutical company is getting closer to a decision on whether the U.S government will approve the first prescription drug derived from the marijuana plant, but parents who for years have used cannabis to treat severe forms of epilepsy in their children are feeling more cautious than celebratory. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is expected to decide by the end of the month whether to approve GW Pharmaceuticals' Epidiolex. It's a purified form of cannabidiol — a component of cannabis that doesn't get users high — to treat Dravet and Lennox-Gastaut syndromes in kids. Both forms of epilepsy are rare. Cannabidiol's effect on a variety of health conditions is frequently touted, but there is still little evidence to back up advocates' personal experiences. The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has long categorized cannabis as a Schedule I drug, a category with 'no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.' That strictly limits research on potential medical uses for cannabis or the chemicals in it, including cannabidiol, or CBD. But for years, parents desperate to find anything to help their children have turned to the marijuana-based products made legal by a growing number of states. Meagan Patrick is among the parents using CBD to treat symptoms in their children. She moved from Maine to Colorado in 2014 so she could legally get CBD for her now-5-year-old daughter, Addelyn, who was born with a brain malformation that causes seizures. 'My child was dying, and we needed to do something,' Patrick said. As for the potential approval of a pharmaceutical based on CBD, she said fear is her first reaction. 'I want to make sure that her right to continue using what works for her is protected, first and foremost. That's my job as her mom,' Patrick said. Advocates like Patrick became particularly concerned when GW Pharmaceuticals' U.S. commercial business, Greenwich Biosciences, began quietly lobbying to change states' legal definition of marijuana, beginning in 2017 with proposals in Nebraska and South Dakota. Some worried the company's attempt to ensure its product could be legally prescribed and sold by pharmacies would have a side effect: curtailing medical marijuana programs already operating in more than two dozen states. The proposals generally sought to remove CBD from states' legal definition of marijuana, allowing it to be prescribed by doctors and supplied by pharmacies. But the change only applies to products that have FDA approval. Neither Nebraska nor South Dakota allows medical use of marijuana, and activists accused the company of trying to shut down future access to products containing cannabidiol but lacking FDA approval. GW Pharmaceuticals never intended for the changes to affect other marijuana products, but they are necessary to allow Epidiolex to be sold in pharmacies if approved, spokesman Stephen Schultz said. He would not discuss other places where the company will seek changes to state law. The Associated Press confirmed that lobbyists representing Greenwich Biosciences backed legislation in California and Colorado this year. 'As a company, we understand there's a significant business building up,' Schultz said. 'All we want to do is make sure our product is accessible.' Industry lobbyists in those states said they take company officials at their word, but they still insisted on protective language ensuring that recreational or medical marijuana, cannabidiol, hemp and other products derived from cannabis plants won't be affected by the changes sought by GW Pharmaceuticals. Patrick Goggin, an attorney who focuses on industrial hemp issues in California, said the company would run into trouble if it tried to 'lock up access' to marijuana-derived products beyond FDA-approved drugs. 'People need to have options and choices,' he said. 'That's the battle here.' Legal experts say the changes are logical. Some states' laws specifically prohibit any product derived from the marijuana plant from being sold in pharmacies. The FDA has approved synthetic versions of another cannabis ingredient for medical purposes but has never approved marijuana or hemp for any medical use. A panel of FDA advisers in April unanimously recommended the agency approve Epidiolex for the treatment of severe seizures in children with epilepsy, conditions that are otherwise difficult to treat. It's not clear why CBD reduces seizures in some patients, but the panel based its recommendation on three studies showing significant reduction in children with two forms of epilepsy. Denver-based attorney Christian Sederberg, who worked on the GW Pharmaceuticals-backed legislation in Colorado on behalf of the marijuana industry, said all forms of marijuana can exist together. 'The future of the industry is showing itself here,' Sederberg said. 'There's going to be the pharmaceutical lane, the nutraceutical (food-as-medicine) lane, the adult-use lane. This shows how that's all coming together.' Alex and Jenny Inman said they won't switch to Epidiolex if it becomes available, though their son Lukas has Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Alex, an information technology professional, and Jenny, a preschool teacher, said it took some at-home experimentation to find the right combination of doctor-prescribed medication, CBD and THC — the component that gives marijuana users a high — that seemed to help Lukas with his seizures. 'What makes me a little bit nervous about this is that there's sort of a psyche amongst patients that, 'Here's this pill, and this pill will solve things,' right? It works differently for different people,' Alex Inman said. The Inmans moved from Maryland to Colorado in 2015 after doctors recommended a second brain surgery for Lukas' seizures. The couple and other parents and advocates for CBD said children respond differently to a variety of strains. The Realm of Caring Foundation, an organization co-founded by Paige Figi, whose daughter Charlotte's name is attached to the CBD oil Charlotte's Web, said it maintains a registry of about 46,000 people worldwide who use CBD. For Heather Jackson, who said her son Zaki, now 15, benefited from CBD and who co-founded the foundation, Epidiolex's approval means insurers will begin paying for treatment with a cannabis-derived product. 'That might be a nice option for some families who, you know, really want to receive a prescription who are going to only listen to the person in the white coat,' Jackson said. ____ Banda and Foody are members of members of AP's marijuana beat team. Follow them at Twitter at http://twitter.com/psbanda and http://twitter.com/katiefoody . Find complete AP marijuana coverage here: http://apnews.com/tag/LegalMarijuana
  • An audio recording that appears to capture the heartbreaking voices of small Spanish-speaking children crying out for their parents at a U.S. immigration facility took center stage Monday in the growing uproar over the Trump administration's policy of separating immigrant children from their parents. 'Papa! Papa!' one child is heard weeping in the audio file that was first reported by the nonprofit ProPublica and later provided to The Associated Press. Human rights attorney Jennifer Harbury said she received the tape from a whistleblower and told ProPublica it was recorded in the last week. She did not provide details about where exactly it was recorded. Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said she had not heard the audio but said children taken into custody by the government are being treated humanely. She said the government has high standards for detention centers and the children are well cared for, stressing that Congress needs to plug loopholes in the law so families can stay together. The audio surfaced as politicians and advocates flocked to the U.S.-Mexico border to visit U.S. immigration detention centers and turn up the pressure on the Trump administration. And the backlash over the policy widened. The Mormon church said it is 'deeply troubled' by the separation of families at the border and urged national leaders to find compassionate solutions. Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker, a Republican, reversed a decision to send a National Guard helicopter from his state to the Mexican border to assist in a deployment, citing the administration's 'cruel and inhumane' policy. At the border, an estimated 80 people pleaded guilty Monday to immigration charges, including some who asked the judge questions such as 'What's going to happen to my daughter?' and 'What will happen to my son?' Attorneys at the hearings said the immigrants had brought two dozen boys and girls with them to the U.S., and the judge replied that he didn't know what would happen to their children. Several groups of lawmakers toured a nearby facility in Brownsville, Texas, that houses hundreds of immigrant children. Democratic Rep. Ben Ray Lujan of New Mexico said the location was a former hospital converted into living quarters for children, with rooms divided by age group. There was even a small room for infants, complete with two high chairs, where two baby boys wore matching rugby style shirts with orange and white stripes. Another group of lawmakers on Sunday visited an old warehouse in McAllen, Texas, where hundreds of children are being held in cages created by metal fencing. One cage held 20 youngsters. More than 1,100 people were inside the large, dark facility, which is divided into separate wings for unaccompanied children, adults on their own, and mothers and fathers with children. In Texas' Rio Grande Valley, the busiest corridor for people trying to enter the U.S., Border Patrol officials say they must crack down on migrants and separate adults from children as a deterrent to others trying to get into the U.S. illegally. 'When you exempt a group of people from the law ... that creates a draw,' said Manuel Padilla, the Border Patrol's chief agent there. House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, speaking to reporters during a tour of San Diego immigration detention facilities with Rep. Juan Vargas and other House Democrats, said family separation is a 'heartbreaking, barbarian issue that could be changed in a moment by the president of the United States rescinding his action.' 'It so challenges the conscience of our country that it must be changed and must be changed immediately,' she said during a news conference at a San Diego terminal that is connected to the airport in Tijuana, Mexico, by a bridge. U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas announced late Monday that he was introducing emergency legislation intended to keep immigrant families together. 'All Americans are rightly horrified by the images we are seeing on the news, children in tears pulled away from their mothers and fathers,' Cruz said. 'This must stop.' President Donald Trump emphatically defended his administration's policy Monday, again falsely blaming Democrats. 'The United States will not be a migrant camp and it will not be a refugee holding facility,' he declared. 'Not on my watch.' ___ Snow reported from Phoenix. Associated Press writers Elliot Spagat in San Diego and Steve LeBlanc in Boston contributed to this report.
  • Smoking in the U.S. has hit another all-time low. About 14 percent of U.S adults were smokers last year, down from about 16 percent the year before, government figures show. There hadn't been much change the previous two years, but it's been clear there's been a general decline and the new figures show it's continuing, said K. Michael Cummings of the tobacco research program at Medical University of South Carolina. 'Everything is pointed in the right direction,' including falling cigarette sales and other indicators, Cummings said. The new figures released Tuesday mean there are still more than 30 million adult smokers in the U.S., he added. Teens are also shunning cigarettes. Survey results out last week showed smoking among high school students was down to 9 percent, also a new low. In the early 1960s, roughly 42 percent of U.S. adults smoked. It was common nearly everywhere — in office buildings, restaurants, airplanes and even hospitals. The decline has coincided with a greater understanding that smoking is a cause of cancer, heart disease and other health problems. Anti-smoking campaigns, cigarette taxes and smoking bans are combining to bring down adult smoking rates, experts say. The launch of electronic cigarettes and their growing popularity has also likely played a role. E-cigarettes heat liquid nicotine into a vapor without the harmful by-products generated from burning tobacco. That makes them a potentially useful tool to help smokers quit, but some public health experts worry it also creates a new way for people to get addicted to nicotine. There was no new information for adult use of e-cigarettes and vaping products, but 2016 figures put that at 3 percent of adults. Vaping is more common among teens than adults. About 13 percent of high school students use e-cigarettes or other vaping devices. The findings on adult smokers come from a national health survey by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 27,000 adults were interviewed last year. ___ The Associated Press Health & Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute's Department of Science Education. The AP is solely responsible for all content.
  • Democrats hoped a Wisconsin case would be the vehicle the U.S. Supreme Court would use to strike down highly partisan gerrymandering of electoral maps. When those hopes fizzled Monday, attention turned to North Carolina. A case challenging that battleground state's congressional districts appears to offer stronger evidence of harm. At issue is whether opponents can identify specific voters who say they have been hurt by gerrymandering — the process of a political party drawing state legislative and congressional maps to maintain or expand their hold on power. The Wisconsin case didn't do that, but the North Carolina case tries to. It includes a plaintiff from each of the state's 13 congressional districts. Allison Riggs, an attorney representing the League of Women Voters of North Carolina and other voters who sued, said the state's congressional map provides 'the most crystal clear example of why a rule creating limits on partisan gerrymandering is so necessary.' Like Wisconsin, North Carolina is closely divided between Democrats and Republicans, yet Republicans hold a 10-3 edge in congressional seats after the GOP-dominated Legislature created the maps. They were forced to redraw the congressional map in 2016 after federal courts determined two of the state's districts to be illegal racial gerrymanders. During the latest redrawing, Republicans said they didn't use racial data in forming the maps. Instead, they said maintaining the GOP's 10-3 seat advantage in the state's congressional delegation was one of their guiding standards. 'I think electing Republicans is better than electing Democrats. So I drew this map to help foster what I think is better for the country,' one of the mapmakers, Republican state Rep. David Lewis, said during a legislative debate to justify the criteria. Lewis and other Republican lawmakers have defended their congressional map by saying it splits fewer counties and avoids the severely contorted boundaries that were common under maps drawn since the 1990s by both Democrats and Republicans. As an example of extreme gerrymandering, the map's critics point to one boundary that splits the historically black and heavily Democratic North Carolina A&T State University campus in Greensboro into two Republican-leaning districts. The Supreme Court is expected to decide by the end of June whether to hear that case and another one from North Carolina that challenges gerrymandered state legislative boundaries. On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a pair of largely procedural rulings in two other redistricting cases. It agreed that a Maryland congressional district can remain in use while Republicans pursue allegations of unconstitutional partisan gerrymandering by the Democratic governor and legislature. In the Wisconsin case, the court overturned a lower court ruling from November 2016. That ruling said the map adopted in 2011 by the Republican-led Legislature and Republican governor violated Democratic voters' rights to representation. Democrats had argued that their voters were packed into some districts and spread among others, which had the effect of diluting their voting power. The Supreme Court rejected the use of a statewide analysis used by 12 Democratic voters who brought the lawsuit. Instead, the court said plaintiffs must prove that their personal voting rights were infringed by the way challenged maps covering 99 Assembly districts were drawn. Lead attorney Paul Smith said it will take voters in about 20 or 30 districts to show they have been harmed by the current boundaries. To fix those problems will 'effectively redraw the entire map,' and 'at that point, gerrymandering will be effectively remedied.' Justice Elena Kagan provided an alternative route for the plaintiffs. She wrote in a concurrent opinion that a political party might be able to bring a statewide challenge by arguing that a partisan gerrymandered map violates its First Amendment right to freedom of association. 'This case is very much still alive,' Smith said while noting both options. He added: 'The bottom line is, there will be plaintiffs with clear standing.' Republicans — who hold a 64-35 majority in the Wisconsin Assembly and 18-15 in the Senate — stood by the maps they drew and said they expected to once again prevail in court. Smith said speed was of the essence, given that those elected in 2020 — just two years away — will be in place for the next round of redistricting. ___ Robertson reported from Raleigh, North Carolina. ___ Associated Press writer David A. Lieb in Jefferson City, Missouri, contributed to this report.
  • A letter signed by 120 sexual abuse victims of former sports doctor Larry Nassar on Tuesday urged Michigan State University's governing board to oust interim president John Engler, saying he had reinforced a 'culture of abuse' at the school. The women and girls issued their joint statement three days before the board of trustees' next meeting and after a week in which demands for Engler's resignation reached a fever pitch. Engler, a former governor who took over on an interim basis in February after the previous president resigned amid fallout from the Nassar scandal, has resisted pressure to step down. Media outlets last week reported that he sent emails to another university official in April criticizing lawyers for Nassar's sexual assault victims and suggesting the first woman to go public with her accusations was probably getting a 'kickback' from her attorney. Among those who signed the letter are Olympic gymnastics gold medalist Aly Raisman, and Rachael Denhollander, a former gymnast who has been one of the most vocal critics of Engler. In their lengthy written statement, the 120 'sister survivors' said they stand together against 'character attacks' and that Engler 'has only reinforced the culture of abuse at MSU.' Current and future victims of sexual abuse 'should know they can raise their voice without being characterized as pawns too foolish to know they are manipulated,' they said. 'There is no debate: President Engler has failed miserably,' they said in the letter. 'Nothing at MSU - none of the mindsets that allowed Larry Nassar to abuse children for decades - have changed. Therefore, it is our position that MSU cannot move forward and become an institution of integrity and safety until John Engler is no longer president.' Two of the university's publicly-elected trustees, Democrats Brian Mossalam and Dianne Byrum, have called for the resignation of Engler, who served as the state's Republican governor from 1991 through 2002. A portion of the statement is directed at the six other trustees, four Republicans and two Democrats, asking them to 'stand for what is right.' 'Unfortunately, and with great regret, John Engler's tenure as interim president has continued the bleeding rather than stem it,' Brian Mosallam said in a statement released Friday morning. Trustees hired Engler after the former president, Lou Anna Simon, suddenly resigned in January in the wake of the Nassar scandal. Nassar himself was fired from Michigan State in 2016, two years after he was the subject of a sexual assault investigation. Under Engler's tenure, Michigan State has agreed to a $500 million settlement with 332 women and girls who said they were sexually assaulted by Nassar, a former campus sports doctor who also worked with the U.S. Olympic gymnastics team. Nassar now is in prison. Of that, $75 million will cover future claims. 'We stood against our abuser. We stood against an abusive culture. Now we are asking you to stand against it too and lead MSU forward into real change,' the letter said in its conclusion.
  • The images Spenser Rapone posted on Twitter from his West Point graduation were intentionally shocking: In one, the smirking cadet opens his dress uniform to expose a T-shirt with a blood-red image of socialist icon Che Guevara. In another, he raises his fist and flips over his cap to reveal the hand-scrawled message: 'Communism will win.' Less than a year after Rapone's images drew a firestorm of vitriol and even death threats, the second lieutenant who became known as the 'commie cadet' is officially out of the U.S. Army with an other-than-honorable discharge. Top brass at Fort Drum's 10th Mountain Division accepted Rapone's resignation Monday after an earlier reprimand for 'conduct unbecoming of an officer.' Rapone said an investigation found he went online to advocate for a socialist revolution and disparage high-ranking officers and U.S. officials. Officially, the Army said in a statement only that it conducted a full investigation and 'appropriate action was taken.' An unrepentant Rapone summed up the fallout in yet another tweet Monday that showed him extending a middle finger at a sign at the entrance to Fort Drum, accompanied by the words, 'One final salute.' 'I consider myself a revolutionary socialist,' the 26-year-old Rapone told The Associated Press in a series of interviews. 'I would encourage all soldiers who have a conscience to lay down their arms and join me and so many others who are willing to stop serving the agents of imperialism and join us in a revolutionary movement.' Rapone said his journey to communism grew out of his experiences as an Army Ranger in Afghanistan before he was accepted into the U.S. Military Academy. And those views only hardened during his studies of history as one of the academy's 'Long Gray Line.' He explained that he took the offending selfies at his May 2016 West Point graduation ceremony and kept them to himself until last September, when he tweeted them in solidarity with NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who was taking heat for kneeling for the national anthem to raise awareness of racism. Many other military personnel also tweeted in favor of Kaepernick, although most were supporting free speech, not communism. West Point released a statement after Rapone posted the photos, saying his actions 'in no way reflect the values of the U.S. Military Academy or the U.S. Army.' And U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, a Florida Republican, called on the secretary of the Army to remove Rapone from the officer ranks. 'While in uniform, Spenser Rapone advocated for communism and political violence, and expressed support and sympathy for enemies of the United States,' Rubio said Monday, adding 'I'm glad to see that they have given him an 'other-than-honorable' discharge.' One of six children growing up in New Castle, Pennsylvania, Rapone said he applied to West Point, which is tuition-free, because he couldn't afford college. He was nominated out of high school by then-U.S. Rep. Jason Altmire in 2010. 'He was an honors student, an athlete, a model citizen who volunteered in the community,' recalled Altmire, a Democrat. 'During the interview, he expressed patriotism and looked just like a top-notch candidate. There were no red flags of any kind.' But he wasn't accepted to West Point, so Rapone enlisted in the Army. He was deployed to Afghanistan in 2011 and was assigned as an assistant machine gunner in Khost Province. 'We were bullies in one of the poorest countries on Earth,' Rapone said. 'We have one of the most technologically advanced militaries of all time and all we were doing is brutalizing and invading and terrorizing a population that had nothing to do with what the United States claimed was a threat.' Toward the end of his deployment, he learned West Point fulfills a certain quota of enlisted soldiers every year. Despite his growing disillusionment about the military, he applied and got in. 'I was still idealistic,' he said.' I figured maybe I could change things from inside.' In addition to classic socialist theorists such as Karl Marx, Rapone says he found inspiration in the writings of Stan Goff, a retired Special Forces master sergeant who became a socialist anti-war activist. Even while still a cadet, Rapone's online postings alarmed a West Point history professor, who wrote Rapone up, saying his online postings were 'red flags that cannot be ignored.' Rapone was disciplined but still allowed to graduate. Greg Rinckey, an attorney specializing in military law, said it's rare for an officer out of West Point to receive an other-than-honorable discharge. He added that it's also possible the military academy could seek repayment of the cost of Rapone's education because he didn't serve the full five-year service obligation required upon graduation. 'I knew there could be repercussions,' said Rapone, who is scheduled to speak at a socialism conference in Chicago next month. 'Of course my military career is dead in the water. On the other hand, many people reached out and showed me support. There are a lot of veterans both active duty and not that feel like I do.
  • The South Carolina city where almost half of all the slaves brought to the United States first set foot on American soil is ready to apologize for its role in the slave trade. The resolution expected to be passed by the Charleston City Council on Tuesday offers a denouncement of slavery, a promise of tolerance in the future and a proposal for an office of racial reconciliation. The vote will be full of symbolism when it is taken by a majority-white council that meets in a City Hall built by slaves. It will happen less than a mile (1.5 kilometers) from the old wharf where slave ships unloaded — soon to be the site of a $75 million African-American history museum. Tuesday is also 'Juneteenth,' a celebration of the end of slavery and just two days after the third anniversary of the racist attack by a white man that killed nine black church members at Emanuel AME church — a target picked in part by Dylann Roof because of its long history. In the 1800s, the church was closed after Charleston's white leaders thought church leaders had fostered a slave revolt. Church members were forced to worship in secret as a result. 'We hereby denounce and apologize for the wrongs committed against African Americans by the institution of slavery and Jim Crow, with sincerest sympathies and regrets for the deprivation of life, human dignity and constitutional protections occasioned as a result thereof,' the resolution reads. Charleston Council member William Dudley Gregorie insists the resolution will be more than just a soon-forgotten vote. He promises the city will support ongoing education about how slaves contributed to all parts of Charleston. A centerpiece of that effort is the International African American Museum . Organizers, including former Charleston Mayor Joe Riley, are trying to raise the millions of additional dollars they will need to break ground this summer and open the museum in 2020. It will be located on the site of the old wharf where slave ships unloaded. The museum will tell the story of African-Americans in the U.S. from slavery to today. It also will include genealogy resources to help families trace their roots.
  • A Jacksonville, Florida, family saved a kitten from the side of a freeway Sunday. >> Read more trending news Rebecca Marshall rescued the kitten, while her daughter, Allison Bullard, caught the entire event on video. The rescue happened where I-95 North nears the Zoo Parkway. Marshall said she was looking out the window when she spotted the kitten. “We hurried and got off the exit and turned around,” Marshall said. “I was scared to death it’d be hit by a car or something by then.” Bullard started to record, and nearly two agonizing minutes went by before they were able to get to the kitten. “We were so scared he was going to run into traffic,” Bullard said. “He just ran straight ahead, it was scary.” The kitten darted, but Marshall was able to catch up to it as it was trying to get into a storm drain. “I just threw the towel over him and that was it, I caught him,” Marshall said. The family wasn’t sure how the kitten ended up there. Thankfully, the kitten from the incident should be fine. “My dad, he noticed that we found him on Mile Marker 357, so we decided to name him Magnum, like the gun,” Bullard said. They're bringing Magnum to the Jacksonville Humane Society on Tuesday. “I knew that I was in danger the whole time, scared to death,” Marshall said. “But, I can’t just leave an innocent life.” “So, it was worth it?” Action News Jax Reporter Russell Colburn asked “It was worth it,” Marshall replied. “I’d do it again in a heartbeat.”