On Air Now

Listen Now

Weather

clear-night
36°
Sunny
H 55° L 29°
  • clear-night
    36°
    Current Conditions
    Sunny. H 55° L 29°
  • clear-day
    51°
    Afternoon
    Sunny. H 55° L 29°
  • clear-night
    45°
    Evening
    Clear. H 55° L 29°
Listen
Pause
Error

Morning show on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

Home team on-demand

00:00 | 00:00

Listen
Pause
Error

The crossover

00:00 | 00:00

State & Regional

    Health officials are worried about the spread of fake facts about the coronavirus as bogus conspiracy theories have been circulating online. The World Health Organization is calling it an “infodemic.” Talk about the coronavirus is all over social media. [INTERACTIVE MAP: Where are the confirmed coronavirus cases? ] 'Where I've seen stories about it is through Snapchat,” American University student Dante Schlemback said. 'I mainly see it on Twitter,” AU student Luke Kvarda said. “It'll be like the headlines: coronavirus.' While there is legitimate information available online, health experts are worried about the misinformation. 'There are rumors that are circulating now that are potentially dangerous that garlic can somehow cure it,” an AU professorial lecturer and assessor with Poynter’s International Fact Check Network, Margot Susca, said. “It's just not true.' RELATED STORIES: Gov. Kemp announces creation of coronavirus task force Coronavirus: 10 myths about the virus debunked How to prepare for a potential coronavirus outbreak Susca said the fake facts can have economic effects, including the false rumor linking the virus to the well-known beer. 'Somehow people have gotten it in their minds that the brand Corona beer is somehow related to the coronavirus, so they're going to see a big sales hit, I think,” Susca said. [READ: Alaska Airlines suspends change, cancellation fees for new flight bookings due to coronavirus ] Susca said people seeking information should go directly to sites for the WHO and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as trusted news sources, to avoid falling for the rumors. 'Lots of people are sharing this misinformation and believing this information, and it's going to have real world economic impacts,” Susca said. Facebook has said it’s working to stop the spread of misinformation about the coronavirus. The social media site said it’s directing people who search about the virus to expert health organizations.
  • Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp announced that he has created a coronavirus task force and the group held its first meeting Friday. As of now, there are no reports of any coronavirus cases in Georgia, but the state wants to be ready if there are. Channel 2 political reporter Richard Elliot was in the room Friday afternoon as Kemp convened the first meeting of the newly created task force. It featured leaders with the Department of Public Health, private hospitals -- including Grady Memorial and Emory University -- and the state, including the attorney general and commander of Georgia’s National Guard. [INTERACTIVE MAP: Where are the confirmed coronavirus cases? ] Kemp said he wanted to have the state prepared should the coronavirus show up in Georgia. “We’ve got a great team assembled. I think y’all bring a lot of different dynamics to the table in things that we are dealing with right now,” Kemp said. About an hour earlier, Kemp joined the state’s chief medical officer, Dr. Kathleen Toomey, to update the media on the state’s readiness. “The bottom line is, we just want be prepared, and we are preparing for the worst but hoping for the best,” Kemp said. Earlier this week, Georgia and other states learned that their testing kits were tainted at the point of manufacture and were useless. RELATED STORIES: Coronavirus: 10 myths about the virus debunked How to prepare for potential coronavirus outbreak Staying home may be key to slowing spread of coronavirus, state health official says All test are now being sent directly to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for testing. Toomey said that has delayed testing in the state by four to five days, but she says they haven’t had many tests to send. “We’ve tested or sent to the CDC under 10 tests, and none have come back to date positive,” Toomey said. Toomey said her No. 1 question she gets is, how do you stop people from getting coronavirus? She said it’s the same way you stop the spread of colds and flues: Wash your hands often, don’t touch your nose or mouth, and if you’re feeling sick, stay home. Dr. Jonathan S. Lewin, Executive Vice President Health Affairs of Emory University, praised the move by the governor. “Today Governor Kemp has taken critical steps to protect Georgians as the world works to address the challenges brought on by the current coronavirus outbreak. His swift action in assembling this taskforce builds on years of work across the state to mitigate a public health crisis. The appointment of Dr. Colleen Kraft from Emory also helps to ensure that lessons applied from our treatment of Ebola patients five years ago will be leveraged to protect health care workers across the state who stand ready.” People named to Governor’s Coronavirus Task Force: Felipe den Brok, Director – City of Atlanta’s Office of Emergency Preparedness Homer Bryson, Director – Georgia Emergency Management & Homeland Security Agency Maj. Gen. Tom Carden, Adjutant General – Georgia National Guard Chris Carr, Attorney General – Office of the Attorney General Sharon Cooper, RN, MSN, Chair – State House Health & Human Services Committee Greg Dozier, Commissioner – Technical College System of Georgia Cherie Drenzek, State Epidemiologist – Georgia Department of Public Health Tim Fleming, Chief of Staff – Office of the Governor John Haupert, FACHE, Chief Executive Officer – Grady Health System John King, Insurance and Safety Fire Commissioner – Georgia Department of Insurance Colleen Kraft, MD, Director – Emory University Clinical Virology Research Laboratory Ryan Loke, Healthcare Advisor – Office of the Governor John Selden, General Manager – Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport Lorri Smith , Chief Operating Officer – Office of the Governor Kathleen Toomey, MD, MPH, Commissioner – Georgia Department of Public Health Ben Watson, MD, Chair – State Senate Health & Human Services Committee Richard Woods, State School Superintendent – Georgia Department of Education Steve Wrigley, Chancellor – University System of Georgia
  • Three children abducted from south Georgia have been found safe somewhere in the midwest, the Camden County Sheriff’s Office says. A national Amber Alert has been issued for Meadow Gentry, 6, Autumn Gentry, 5, and Cole Gentry, 3, after they were abducted from their Camden County home by Marshall Gentry around noon Wednesday. We’ll have the latest on this developing story, RIGHT NOW on Channel 2 Action News. TRENDING STORIES: Coronavirus checklist: 100-plus disinfectants that may kill coronavirus on surfaces 2 dead, 1 injured in horrific South Fulton County crash For 1st time since 1996, Olympic cauldron to be lit in Atlanta According to a spokesperson with Kingsbay Naval Submarine Base, Marshall Gentry was a sailor on the base. Camden County Capt. Larry Bruce says that Gentry and his wife had recently filed for divorce and the two went to pick up their eldest child on Wednesday. This is a picture of Tiffany Gentry and Marshall Gentry. @ActionNewsJax pic.twitter.com/NPdUyOeLli — Christy Turner (@ChristyANJax) February 27, 2020 He says that around 8 a.m. Thursday, Marshall did not show up for work at Naval Submarine Base Kings Bay. He reportedly lived on base in the pop-up camper. When his supervisor went to check on him, they found his camper had been moved, so they went to his wife’s address in St. Marys. They found his military uniforms on the front porch of the house. Investigators say Marshall Gentry was “known to be suicidal and heavily armed.” ActionNewsJax contributed to this article .
  • Investigators announced Wednesday afternoon that they have made another arrest in the investigation into the killing of a Fort Valley State University student. Prosecutors believe Anitra Gunn was strangled by her boyfriend, Demarcus Little, a soldier. According to warrants, prosecutors believe the soldier choked Gunn to death at a residential property on a rural road in middle Georgia. On Wednesday afternoon, the Georgia Bureau of Investigation announced that a friend of Little’s had been arrested on suspicion of concealing Gunn’s death. The GBI said agents took Jaivon Abron, 22, into custody and charged him with two counts of making false statements and one count of concealing a death. Abron was taken into custody at his home in Valdosta and is now in custody in Peach County. Investigators said they also recovered Gunn’s cellphone. Jaivon Abron The GBI said agents took Jaivon Abron, 22, into custody in connection with the death of FVSU student Anitra Gunn. TRENDING STORIES: Milwaukee shooting: 6 dead, including gunman, after mass shooting at Molson Coors Beverage Company Man dies following shooting outside metro Atlanta Walmart Coronavirus: How the virus is impacting Georgia-based companies Gunn vanished from Fort Valley, where she was a student at Fort Valley State University, on Feb. 14. Her body was discovered several days later in a wooded area in Crawford County. Investigators say she was killed sometime between 2:30 a.m. and just before midnight Feb. 14. Last week, Peach County Sheriff Terry Deese said that Little was a person of interest in the case and that he’d been arrested on unrelated charges. Little was initially accused of smashing the windows at Gunn’s apartment and slashing her car’s tires days before she vanished. He was later arrested in connection with her death. Investigators said there could still be more arrests in the case and they are looking for the white bumper of the white, 2013 Chevrolet Cruze that Gunn was driving when she was killed.
  • A cold front has started moving through the area and temperatures are starting to drop. Severe Weather Team 2 Meteorologist Brad Nitz says the colder temps mean there is the possibility for some snow flurries in the higher elevations of the north Georgia mountains tonight. Here’s what you need to know: Temps to drop into the 30s tonight Expect wind chills in the 20s across the metro Thursday morning When we could start seeing a warm up, RIGHT NOW on Channel 2 Action News.
  • In just over two weeks, we’ll be springing forward and setting our clocks for daylight saving time. A lot of people don’t like losing that hour of sleep, but others love the extra daylight in the evening. Lawmakers are considering asking voters if they’d like to pick daylight or standard time and leave it there year-round. “The government is in charge of the clocks. The clocks are killing the people,” said time change expert Scott Yates, who flew in from Denver to talk to lawmakers about switching back and forth between daylight saving and standard time. Yates told Channel 2 political reporter Richard Elliot that the time change causes all kinds of problems from an increase in heart attacks and traffic accidents to, he claims, tougher prison sentences from sleep-deprived judges. He doesn’t care which time gets picked so long as time stays the same. TRENDING STORIES: Stocks tumble again as concerns rise about Coronavirus Several children suffer minor injuries in crash involving two school buses Woman says dealership was supposed to repair truck, but she tracked it to employee’s home “The main idea is we want to lock the clock. Like, there’s some people who think standard time is better. Some that thing daylight saving is better, but there’s nobody that thinks changing the clocks is great,” Yates said. The lawmakers aren’t deciding what Georgia will do, daylight or standard, but they could let Georgians decide which they like best in a nonbinding referendum. “There’s so many problems that we have when it changes,” said Bryleigh Brock with Girls Scouts from Troop 16184, who were taking a tour of the Capitol on Tuesday. The Girl Scout troop left the hearing thinking they like the idea of no springing forward or falling back. “It’s just hard in general to keep up with the time and to keep on switching your clocks,” said Zoe Elgin. There was no vote Tuesday on the possible referendum. That could come later on.
  • Young undocumented immigrants known as dreamers could soon qualify for in-state tuition, but only if lawmakers and the governor approve a new plan. Channel 2 political reporter Richard Elliot spoke to state lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who say this issue is all about fairness. A dreamer is a person who was brought into this country illegally as a small child so the United States, and Georgia, are the only home they’ve ever known. But because they’re undocumented, they have to pay out of state tuition. That could soon change. Jessica Colotl became Georgia’s best-known dreamer when federal agents tried to deport the Kennesaw State University student after she got a traffic ticket. Her parents brought her here when she was just 11 years old. Since then, other dreamers have had to pay out-of-state tuition to attend Georgia colleges and universities, even though they’ve lived most of their lives here and graduated high school. Republican state Rep. Kasey Carpenter of Dalton just dropped one of three bills that would allow those dreamers to pay in-state tuition at some Georgia schools. TRENDING STORIES: Stocks tumble again as concerns rise about Coronavirus Several children suffer minor injuries in crash involving two school buses Woman says dealership was supposed to repair truck, but she tracked it to employee’s home He says it’s really about fairness. “These are kids that I go to church with. These are kids I’ve coached in youth sports. These are kids that go to school with my children, so to me, it’s like I said, it’s a fairness issue,” Carpenter said. Democratic state Rep. Bob Trammell says it’s all about fairness, too. He’s got his own version of the dreamer’s in-state tuition bill. He told Elliot that he’s encouraged by some bipartisan support. “I think that speaks to the recognition that we are losing talent and speaks to the fairness issue, and hopefully, that means there’s momentum for things to move forward,” Trammell said. Democratic state Rep. Pedro Marin, from Gwinnett County, has been fighting for this for 18-years. He says he’s happy to see bipartisan interest in getting these kids some help. “We’ve got to keep those bright minds. We’ve got to keep them here in Georgia and have them be better citizens for the state,” Marin said. Carpenter’s version limits this to Georgia schools with less than 98% enrollment. He does expect an uphill battle to get the bill passed.
  • Whether you’re into hiking or just want a peek at a spectacular view, north Georgia is home to some of the most beautiful waterfalls you will see -- and they’re not that far away. Here are a few of the best waterfalls you will find in the region: Anna Ruby Falls Anna Ruby Falls is created by two creeks meeting and cascading over a drop off inside Unicoi State Park. The Curtis Creek Falls drop about 153 feet and the York Creek Falls drop about 50 feet. (PHOTO: Scott Flynn, WSB-TV) Anna Ruby Falls Part of the Chattahoochee National Forest, Anna Ruby Falls in Helen is a must for anyone who loves waterfalls. Anna Ruby Falls is created by two creeks meeting and cascading over a drop off inside Unicoi State Park. The Curtis Creek Falls drop about 153 feet and the York Creek Falls drop about 50 feet. There is a paved path that takes you to the base of the falls that is about a half-mile long. It starts at the Anna Ruby Falls visitor center. At the base of the falls, there are two different viewing decks to get a great view of the falls. There is a $3 per person fee to see the falls. Amicalola Falls Amicalola Falls is the third highest cascading waterfall east of the Mississippi River, dropping about 729 feet. (Scott Flynn, WSB-TV) Amicalola Falls Located just northeast of Dawsonville, Amicalola Falls is found within the state park of the same name. Amicalola Falls is the third highest cascading waterfall east of the Mississippi River, dropping about 729 feet. You have a couple of options to view the falls. There are viewing areas at the top and bottom of the falls that you can drive and park at. The other option is to walk up the falls using the path made up of pavement and staircases that crisscross the falls and have several spots to stop and view the falls as well as the spectacular view of the Appalachian Mountains. Views are particularly stunning in the fall when the leaves charge. There is a $5 fee to get into Amicalola State Park. High Falls State Park High Falls is the tallest cascading waterfall south of Atlanta, according the state’s website. (PHOTO: Scott Flynn, WSB-TV) High Falls Venture south of Atlanta to High Falls State Park and enjoy the tumbling cascades along the Towaliga River in Butts County. You can hike along the shores of the river to enjoy several falls along the way and even see the remains of a hydroelectric power plant foundation. High Falls is the tallest cascading waterfall south of Atlanta, according the state’s website. The park is also known as one of the top fishing destinations for hybrid and white bass. You will have to pay the normal $5 parking fee for Georgia State Parks. Tallulah Gorge You can hike the rim trails to overlook the Tallulah Gorge or take the trails from the Jane Hurt Yarn Interpretive Center down into the gorge to get a peak at five different waterfalls that flow through the gorge. (Scott Flynn, WSB-TV) Tallulah Gorge If you want to see several waterfalls all in one trip, then a trek through the Tallulah Gorge at Tallulah Gorge State Park is a good bet. The gorge itself is two miles long and is nearly 1,000 feet deep. You can hike the rim trails to overlook the gorge or take the trails from the Jane Hurt Yarn Interpretive Center down into the gorge to get a peek at five different waterfalls that flow through the gorge. There is an 80-foot suspension bridge that crosses over the gorge to connect the north and south side trails that overlook the gorge. If you want to hike the gorge floor, you will need to get a permit from the interpretive center. There is also a $5 parking fee to get into the park. Toccoa Falls Toccoa Falls is one of the tallest free-falling waterfalls east of the Mississippi River, according to the city of Toccoa’s website. (PHOTO: Scott Flynn, WSB-TV) Toccoa Falls If you’re looking for an easy, beautiful trip, then a stop at Toccoa Falls is the right fit for you. Toccoa Falls is one of the tallest free-falling waterfalls east of the Mississippi River, according to the city of Toccoa’s website. The falls are part of Toccoa Falls College, a four-year, fully accredited Christian college. When you arrive at the main entrance of the college you will see signs directing you to the falls. You will park at the Toccoa Falls visitor center and you can enter to see the falls through the center’s gift shop. There is a $2 fee for people who are not county residents. When you walk out of the gift shop, there is a short path that takes you to the base of the falls.
  • Construction of an environmental barrier is underway around a capsized cargo ship off the Georgia coast. The Golden Ray overturned in September 2019 near the Port of Brunswick carrying 24 crew members and a cargo of 4,200 cars. All crew members were rescued, but the cars have remained on board, presenting a “substantial threat of discharge” according to a lawsuit filed this week. The multiagency command overseeing the wreck removal hopes to start cutting the ship into sections in April. RELATED STORIES: Judge questions plan to remove capsized ship in huge chunks 6,000 tons of rock to stabilize overturned ship in Port of Brunswick All 4 crew members rescued from overturned cargo ship off Georgia coast A company called Weeks Marine is building an underwater wall that includes sending 80 massive beams down into the sea floor. A multiagency command said this week it plans to leave the 4,200 automobiles inside the huge sections of the ship that are to be lifted by a giant crane and loaded onto a barge. Though crews plan to wrap open ends of each chunk with a mesh material to contain debris, some vehicles are expected slip through. “We do expect that some of the cars will end up in the water as part of the cutting process,” said Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class Nate Littlejohn, a spokesman for the multiagency team. The new environmental barrier is aimed at containing any debris while crews dismantle the ship and eventually remove the ship from the port. Information for this article is from CNN, The Associated Press and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.
  • Porch pirates could get up to five years in prison for snatching people’s packages under a new bill. House Bill 954 would make mail theft and porch piracy distinct crimes under Georgia law; currently, taking someone’s packages or letters would be charged under the general theft statute. If HB 954 passes, stealing a package from someone’s doorstep would be a felony. Rep. Bonnie Rich, R-Suwanee, said she filed the bill to combat the rate of package thefts. American adults order an average of 45 packages each year, according to a 2019 report from market research agency C+R Research. More than one-third of people nationwide have had a package stolen, and the average cost to replace a stolen package is $109, according to the same report. TRENDING STORIES: 5 gang members arrested in murder of 14-year-old girl during home invasion, sheriff says Who are the Ghostface Gangsters? Here’s how Georgia ranks for the most sinful states in the country “We are having an epidemic of porch piracy right now,” Rich said. Many Georgia cases of mail and package theft fall under misdemeanor theft charges. Theft becomes a felony when the stolen item is worth at least $500, so stolen shoes, phone chargers or kids’ toys usually don’t make the cut. Making package theft a felony regardless of the item’s value would create a deterrent for a crime that’s as easy as walking up to someone’s door, grabbing a box and walking away, Rich said. Read more of this story by Amanda C. Coyne at AJC.com