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    CLIFTON PARK, N.Y. (AP) - The hardest part of NBA draft night for Kevin Huerter was keeping a straight face. He knew, moments before virtually anyone else did, that he was about to become a professional basketball player. Dozens of friends and family flanked him, all their eyes intently on the television screens as they waited for NBA Commissioner Adam Silver to stand at his lectern in New York and give the word that they all came to hear. But Huerter had gotten a tip through his agent moments before, after a call from New York to his draft party at a country club near his home in an Albany suburb, that his moment was near. So he sat back and waited to see - would it be San Antonio at No. 18 or Atlanta at No. 19? The answer arrived when the Spurs took Miami's Lonnie Walker IV at No. 18, and with that, it was time to await the next sentence from the commissioner. 'The Atlanta Hawks select Kevin Huerter,' Silver said. And there it was. The Moment. There was yelling, there was jumping, there even were a few tears. Huerter hugged his mother, then his father, then his brother and then his sisters. The 19-year-old who left Maryland after two seasons had just become the No. 19 pick in the NBA draft, off to the Hawks as their second first-round selection of the evening after they wound up with Oklahoma's Trae Young following a trade earlier. Draft day for Huerter was remarkably normal, which was by design. He worked out, went back to his old school and talked to kids, took a dip in his parents' backyard pool, then sprawled out on a couch to watch an Ace Ventura movie. 'This is who Kevin is,' said Tony Dzikas, Huerter's coach at Shenendehowa High. 'Laid-back, special kid, wants to share moments with the people who matter most to him. But on the floor, he knows exactly what to do and exactly how to do it. He's special there too, just in a very different way. The Atlanta Hawks got a winner tonight.' He could have gone to New York and been with other draftees, but Huerter instead decided to invite about 200 friends and relatives to share the moment with him. They had burgers, chicken and hot dogs, plowed through some desserts, some sipped drinks and others just showed up to say that they were there to see one of their own make it big. Plenty of his former coaches were in attendance: Dzikas, along with Maryland's Mark Turgeon and the Albany City Rocks' Jim Hart from his AAU years. So were a slew of his former teammates, including a carload that drove up from Maryland earlier in the day just to be there for the big moment. The Hawks' initial assessment of Huerter suggests that he'll be part of the rotation as a rookie. 'He's a 6-foot-7 wing so he has good size,' Hawks general manager Travis Schlenk said. 'He has great ball skills, really good shooter, shot over 40 percent from 3 during his college career. Has ability to put the ball on the floor and get in the lane, so we're excited about his playmaking ability.' For a day that carried such significance, it started about as low-key as possible. Thomas Huerter Sr., Kevin's father, left for a workout around 7 a.m. About an hour later, Erin Huerter, Kevin's mother, was folding his laundry in the kitchen. Upstairs, the soon-to-be-draftee was sound asleep in his bed until shortly before his 10 a.m. session at a nearby gym. At lunchtime, when the whole family - both parents and all four kids - gathered for sandwiches with the Argentina-Croatia World Cup match playing in the background, not a word was said about the draft. It wasn't a conscious choice, and the draft wasn't a forbidden topic or anything. There were just other things to chat about, none of it amounting to much more than small talk. On the biggest day of Kevin Huerter's life to date, he was unfazed. 'Deciding between four shirts,' he said. That was his biggest decision of the day. He has handled the draft process in about as low-key a fashion as possible. On his last night before officially becoming an NBA player, Huerter helped his parents set up the backyard of their home for their draft after-party, then went inside and sprawled out on a couch for some apple pie around midnight while watching replays of Giancarlo Stanton's game-ending home run for the New York Yankees. No entourages coming over. No wild parties. No talk of what to buy first. 'That's my personality,' he said. 'I don't get fazed by a lot of moments, even when it's on the court.' ___ More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/tag/NBAbasketball
  • ATLANTA (AP) _ The winning numbers in Thursday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Cash 3 Night' game were: 7-8-7 (seven, eight, seven)
  • ATLANTA (AP) _ The winning numbers in Thursday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Cash 4 Night' game were: 2-1-5-4 (two, one, five, four)
  • ATLANTA (AP) _ The winning numbers in Thursday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Fantasy 5' game were: 02-06-08-09-42 (two, six, eight, nine, forty-two)
  • ATLANTA (AP) _ The winning numbers in Thursday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'Jumbo Bucks Lotto' game were: 08-13-27-28-29-34 (eight, thirteen, twenty-seven, twenty-eight, twenty-nine, thirty-four)
  • ATLANTA (AP) _ The winning numbers in Thursday evening's drawing of the Georgia Lottery's 'All or Nothing Night' game were: 01-04-05-08-09-11-12-14-15-18-20-23 (one, four, five, eight, nine, eleven, twelve, fourteen, fifteen, eighteen, twenty, twenty-three)
  • MINNEAPOLIS (AP) - The Minnesota Timberwolves could have used their draft picks in deals to help clear space under the salary cap for potential free agent additions next month. They needed some high-ceiling young players just as much. Opting against any deals, the Timberwolves selected Georgia Tech guard Josh Okogie with the 20th overall pick in the first round of the NBA Draft on Thursday night, targeting a tough-minded player with defensive versatility as a primary asset. 'Nothing presented itself that would be better than actually selecting at 20,' general manager Scott Layden said. The same went for the 48th overall choice, when Ohio State forward Keita Bates-Diop was still available in the second round. The Big Ten Player of the Year was widely projected as a late first-round pick. 'Having a pick this year was critical for us, just to continue to grow,' coach Tom Thibodeau said. 'We think we have to have a blend, of young players, players that are in the middle and obviously the older veterans. But having those young guys, it's important for the team, for the growth of the organization.' Okogie played two seasons for the Yellow Jackets, averaging 16.9 points per game and shooting 43.7 percent from the field. The 6-foot-4, 213-pound Okogie led the Atlantic Coast Conference with an average of 6.8 free throw attempts per game last season, bringing consistent doses of energy and physicality. Born in Nigeria, Okogie grew up outside of Atlanta. He was third in the ACC in 2017-18 with an average of 1.8 steals per game and also grabbed an average of 6.3 rebounds per game. Okogie's wingspan was measured at the draft combine this spring at 7 feet and his three-quarters-of-the-court sprint time was just 3.04 seconds. With a vertical leap of 42 inches that tied Villanova's Donte DiVincenzo for the highest at the combine, Okogie is capable of guarding multiple positions, an ability treasured by Thibodeau. Toughness is another trait that assuredly attracted Okogie to Thibodeau, conducting his third draft since being hired in Minnesota. Okogie, who watched the draft with family, friends and teammates in Atlanta, had trouble composing himself when Thibodeau called. 'When he said, 'Josh,' to be honest, I blacked out,' Okogie said. 'I was just like, 'This is surreal.' Everything happened so fast. They called my name. Everybody's screaming. I'm getting tackled. Crying.' Depth at the wing positions was a glaring need for the Wolves this offseason, with no backups set yet for Jimmy Butler and Andrew Wiggins. Jamal Crawford and Derrick Rose are set to become free agents. Perimeter shooting is another priority after Minnesota ranked last in the league with an average of 8.0 made 3-pointers per game. The Wolves were 19th in the NBA with a 3-point shooting percentage of 35.7. Last year, the Timberwolves used draft night to reshape their roster with a headliner trade for the All-Star Butler that dealt Kris Dunn, Zach LaVine and seventh overall pick Lauri Markkanen to Chicago. The Bulls then sent the 16th overall selection, Justin Patton, to the Wolves. Patton sat out his entire rookie season with a broken foot. Markkanen made the NBA All-Rookie team after averaging 15.2 points per game. With little space under the cap, the Wolves could've used their first-rounder in a package to trade away some veteran salary, but the pick was also important as a way to cheaply add a rotation-caliber player. Thibodeau has long favored experience on the court, skimping on time for young players, but Okogie has shown an ability to make catch-and-shoot 3-pointers from the corner that could supplement his defense enough to warrant time in the rotation. 'I think I can help from day one,' he said. The Wolves passed on one of the sharpest outside shooters in this draft class, Duke's Grayson Allen, but took advantage of a rich pool of wing players to snag Bates-Diop, the leading scorer in the Big Ten as a fourth-year senior in 2017-18 at 19.8 points per game. He was limited to nine games as a junior because of a leg injury and took a redshirt for the 2016-17 season. The 6-foot-7, 235-pound Bates-Diop finished his college career as a 47.2 percent shooter from the field. ___ For more AP NBA coverage: https://apnews.com/tag/NBAbasketball
  • DETROIT (AP) - Because these days you can't have too many SUVs, General Motors is bringing back the Chevrolet Blazer. Only this time it's not a thirsty and boxy truck like its predecessor, one of the original SUVs that was sold from the 1982 through 2005 model years. SUVs based on car underpinnings, sometimes called crossover vehicles, are what buyers want these days, and the Chevy brand didn't have a midsize one with two rows of seats to compete with the popular Jeep Grand Cherokee, the Ford Edge and Nissan Murano. So GM on Thursday unveiled the sculpted Blazer in Atlanta, trying to capitalize on a well-known name that has a lot of equity, said Steve Majoros, Chevy's director of car and crossover marketing. 'There's still a number of people that either have good positive feelings about that product or still have them in their driveways,' he said. At its peak in 1996, Chevrolet sold just over 246,000 Blazers. The new Blazer, to be made at GM's Ramos Arizpe factory in Mexico, is far from a box. It sits relatively low to the ground and has futuristic creases on the sides and a low-angle windshield to give it a sporty look. Chevy says it will come standard with a 193-horsepower, 2.5-liter four-cylinder engine, with an optional 305 horsepower 3.6-liter V6. All models will have stop-start technology that shuts off the engine at red traffic lights, plus nine-speed automatic transmissions that will help gas mileage. Gas mileage and price weren't released by GM. Chevy hopes to take a chunk out of Grand Cherokee sales, one of the more popular and profitable vehicles in the Jeep lineup, in the growing midsize SUV segment. Last year Fiat Chrysler sold nearly 159,000 Grand Cherokees. The choice to build the Blazer in Mexico brought a rebuke from the United Auto Workers union, which said in a statement that GM is building the SUV south of the border while GM workers in the U.S. are laid off and unemployed. The Blazer also could get caught up in a potential trade war, with President Donald Trump threatening tariffs on imported vehicles. GM said the decision to build in Mexico was made years ago and that the Blazer's engines are made in the U.S. The Blazer, due in showrooms early next year, comes as American buyers continue their shift from cars to trucks and SUVs. This year trucks and SUVs accounted for about two-thirds U.S. new-vehicle sales, with cars making up the rest.
  • GRIFFIN, Ga. (AP) - Half the evidence collected from the scene of the 1983 slaying of a black man has vanished, but witnesses have come forward to say the defendant admitted to the killing just hours after the body was found, experts with the Georgia Bureau of Investigation testified Thursday. Frank Gebhardt is on trial for murder in what prosecutors describe as the racist slaying of Tim Coggins. The case went unsolved for decades. Prosecutors now believe Gebhardt and another man, William Moore, stabbed, cut and dragged Coggins behind a pickup truck because he was dating a white woman. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports GBI experts testified that Coggins' blood-stained pants, underwear and the sheet his body was wrapped in were recovered, but the DNA pulled from the blood evidence did not match Gebhardt or Moore. Willard Sanders, one of the men who discovered Coggins' body along a cut for a power line 34 years ago, said within hours of the discovery he talked with Gebhardt who he says admitted to the slaying. 'He brought up, did we find the body on the power line? I said 'yeah,'' Sanders told jurors. 'And he said he and Bill put him there. He said Bill killed him, and he tied chains to his feet and drug him on the power line.' One of Gebhardt's former cellmates testified that Gebhardt told him he took the knife used in the killing and dumped it down a well on his property. A GBI expert testified they found a rusty knife in that well along with a chain when they excavated it in 2017. Jonathan Bennett wasn't even born when the killing happened, but he told jurors that years later, he overheard Gebhardt telling his father that he had killed Coggins. 'He said that William Moore stabbed him 38 times, and then he tied him to the back of the truck and drug him down the road,' Bennett said. Wednesday, a former medical examiner testified that Coggins was stabbed around 30 times. Moore will go on trial for murder later this year. The prosecution could rest its case by Friday. ___ Information from: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, http://www.ajc.com
  • NEWNAN, Ga. (AP) - Rapper Jim Jones has been arrested after a brief police chase in west Georgia. A Coweta County investigator said he saw a southbound Mercedes sport utility vehicle drift into the emergency lane on Interstate 85 several times late Wednesday. News outlets report when the investigator pulled the car over, he said it appeared to be filled with smoke and smelled of marijuana. As officers approached, the driver accelerated and led authorities on a short chase. Police pulled in front of the SUV to stop it and were hit by the driver. The four people inside, including Jones, were arrested early Thursday on multiple charges including narcotics possession and receiving stolen property. Jones, 41, said he told the driver of the car, identified as Ana Rajnee Miles, to pull over but said she was acting 'incoherent,' according to the police report. Jones has appeared on reality TV. His 2006 song, 'We Fly High,' reached No. 5 on Billboard Hot 100. Investigators searched the car and found a backpack in the back seat containing 23 Oxycodone pills, a Titan .25-caliber pistol with seven bullets in the chamber, marijuana, a Ruger SR 9mm handgun reported stolen from DeKalb County in March, another backpack that contained a variety of Oxycodone, Percocet and THC oil, a passport and $148 in cash. Officials said Jones admitted smoking marijuana, but claimed the marijuana found in the car was not his. He also denied any knowledge of the firearms and told officers he has a prescription for the pills. Jones faces charges including receiving stolen property, possession of firearm during the commission of a crime, narcotics possession, marijuana possession and dangerous drugs to be kept in original container, according to jail reports. Miles, 23, faces charges of aggravated assault, fleeing/attempting to elude police, theft by receiving stolen property, narcotics possession, marijuana possession, dangerous drugs to be kept in original container, aggressive driving and failure to maintain lane. Passengers Darnell Maurice Wright, 31, and Jamal Rajhun Smith, 32, were also charged with narcotics possession, marijuana possession and possession of firearm during commission of a crime. Smith was also charged with theft by receiving stolen property. Jones is a hip-hop recording artist from Bronx, New York, a reality TV star and an original member of the hip-hop group The Diplomats, popularly known as Dipset. He released a new solo album called Wasted Talent on April 13, according to Billboard.com