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    Florida Atlantic coach Lane Kiffin was fined $5,000 and reprimanded by Conference USA for criticizing the officiating in the Owls' Friday game by positing on Twitter a photo of blind officials, using canes and being led around by seeing eye dogs. Kiffin tweeted out the photo-shopped image Saturday night and included @ConferenceUSA about 24 hours after FAU lost 36-31 to Marshall at home. Conference USA on Sunday announced Kiffin had been disciplined. Commissioner Judy MacLeod said in a statement the conference was obligated to enforce the 'rules and standards regarding sportsmanship which have been adopted by our membership.' ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • Tiger Woods is returning from another surgical procedure on his left knee — his fifth on the same problem spot. 'Unfortunately, I've been down this road with my knee before,' Woods said Monday. 'This is my fifth operation on it. I understand what it takes to come back from it. It's been nice to have movement again and not having it catch and lock up.' Woods, who had arthroscopic surgery two months ago, plays the made-for-television 'The Challenge: Japan Skins' event on Monday, and the Zozo Championship beginning on Thursday — the first full PGA Tour event in Japan. Woods will play with Rory McIlroy, Jason Day, and Hideki Matsuyama in the skins game at the Narashino Country Club, the same venue for Zozo Championship. The course is located about 50 kilometers (30 miles) northeast of central Tokyo. The course for next year's Olympics is located nearby at the Kasumigaseki Country Club. Woods said the knee troubled him all season, becoming more bothersome after he won the Masters in April. 'It progressively got worse and got to where it was affecting even reading putts,' Wood said. 'You could see toward the end of the year I wasn't getting down on my putts well.' Woods said he had the surgery, wanting to be ready for the two events this week in Japan, followed in December by the Hero Challenge, and the Presidents Cup in Melbourne, Australia. 'It's been nice to be able to squat down and read putts and start going at it full speed again,' Woods said. 'It's just been wear-and-tear over the years. It's just been stressed out for a very long time.' Woods repeated his interest in playing in next year's Tokyo Olympics. But he has work to do to qualify. 'It would be an honor to represent my country in the Olympic Games,' Wood said. 'Right now I'm ninth in the world ranking and hopefully in the next year I can have a good year and qualify and represent my country.' ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Ezekiel Elliott powered into the Philadelphia secondary and simply ran over safety Malcolm Jenkins. The apparent 14-yard touchdown run by the star Dallas running back was overturned on review because his knee was down at the 1 — but the message had been sent early in a game with the division lead on the line. The Cowboys (4-3) are back in control of the NFC East after ending a three-game losing streak that clouded the high expectations for the defending division champions following a 3-0 start. Elliott got his touchdown the play after overpowering Jenkins on his way to 111 yards, Dak Prescott threw an easy scoring pass on a great fake to his backfield mate before a late TD run and the Cowboys rolled to a 37-10 victory over the Eagles on Sunday night. 'That's how I play every week,' Elliott said. 'I like to think of the defense as a shield. In the first quarter, you hit them a couple times, you dent the shield a little bit. You keep on hitting it.' Prescott's 8-yard scoring run for the final points broke Roger Staubach's club record of 20 rushing TDs by a quarterback and sent the Cowboys into their open week feeling good after a week of talk that coach Jason Garrett's job might be on the line. Next time out, they'll be going for a season sweep of the New York Giants and possibly a firmer hold on first in the NFC East. 'No doubt in my mind about how we were going to come out and perform tonight,' Prescott said. 'We didn't panic. We didn't have to say everything hit the fan, let's start over. We doubled down on who we are and just got better.' Carson Wentz threw an interception and had two of Philadelphia's three lost fumbles. The Eagles (3-4) dropped their second straight game after a two-game winning streak that looked like it might get their season going. 'A little embarrassed,' Wentz said. 'We didn't show up.' Brett Maher finished the highest-scoring half against Doug Pederson since he became coach of the Eagles in 2016, kicking a 63-yarder on the final play before halftime for a 27-7 lead. Maher is the first kicker in NFL history with three field goals of at least 60 yards — and all three have been at least 62. He kicked a 62-yarder last week against the New York Jets. Maher's other from 62 was against the Eagles last season, his first in the league. Pederson had to clarify during the week that he wasn't guaranteeing a win after saying on his radio show that his team would go down to Dallas, win the game and fly home in first place. And the coach tried to reverse Philadelphia's trend of slow starts by taking the ball after winning the coin flip, just the second time in 33 winning flips that Pederson hasn't deferred in order to start the second half on offense. It backfired when the Eagles fumbled on their first two possessions, leading to a pair of touchdowns after the Cowboys got the ball on the opponent's side of the 50 for the first two times this season. Before that, Dallas was the only team in the NFL that hadn't started a drive on the favorable side of midfield. 'I feel like he got a statement today, and so we're going to let him go sleep on it,' said defensive end DeMarcus Lawrence, whose sack of Wentz created the second turnover. Dallas Goedert fumbled on a hit from Jaylon Smith at the end of an 8-yard catch on the opening possession, and Maliek Collins recovered at the Philadelphia 45. Five plays later, receiver Tavon Austin took an option pitch 20 yards for the score. After Wentz fumbled on the sack by Lawrence, and Antwaun Woods recovered, Elliott ran over Jenkins on the next play, then scored from the 1 after this initial TD was overturned. 'It starts with me,' Pederson said. 'This is one of those games that I take personal from that standpoint. I've got to get that fixed.' The Cowboys answered the only touchdown from Eagles — Wentz's 28-yard pass to Goedert — when Prescott faked a handoff to Elliott from the 1 and threw to a wide-open Blake Jarwin in the end zone for a 21-7 lead. Prescott was 21 of 27 for 239 yards with a touchdown and an interception and had another 30 yards rushing. Amari Cooper caught five passes for 106 yards after missing most of a loss to the previously winless Jets with a thigh injury. Wentz was 16 of 26 for 191 yards and the Cowboys held the Eagles to 283 yards after letting second-year Jets quarterback Sam Darnold have one of his best games as a pro last week. GROUND CONTROL Dallas finished with 189 yards rushing, 116 more than the average that the league's No. 2 run defense was allowing. Elliott, the last back to get 100 yards against the Eagles, did it again on 22 carries. The two-time NFL rushing champion is averaging 115 yards in five games against his division rival. It was his fourth 100-yard game of the season. INJURIES Dallas linebacker Leighton Vander Esch didn't return after injuring his neck in the first half. He walked off the field after staying down for a few minutes. Cowboys defensive end Robert Quinn had a sack in the first half before leaving with a rib injury. UP NEXT Eagles: At Buffalo next Sunday. Cowboys: At the Giants on Monday, Nov. 4. ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Gerrit Cole could be seeing a lot more of the New York Yankees real soon. While there was no Game 7 for the Astros' ace to face the Yankees in the AL Championship Series, could he start New York's opener at Baltimore on March 26? 'The work never ends,' New York manager Aaron Boone said after Saturday night's season-ending Game 6 loss. 'We'll continue to try and I guess close that gap or put ourselves in a position to get over the hump. I know everyone in our room believes we will, and we'll have a lot of battle scars when we do finally get to the top of that mountain.' Boone memorably called his team Savages in the Box during a midsummer tirade at an umpire. While that may be true, he lacked Marauders on the Mound. Specifically in his rotation. New York starters had a 4.51 ERA, 15th in the major leagues, well behind the elite staffs of Los Angeles Dodgers (3.11) and pennant-winning Washington (3.53) and Houston (3.61). Yankees starters were just 26th among the 30 teams in innings, more than 160 fewer than the Nationals and nearly 130 less than the Astros. Cole will be the top available starter on the free-agent market, and the 29-year-old right-hander is likely to top the record contract for a pitcher, David Price's $217 million, seven-year deal with Boston signed ahead of the 2016 season. Lower-priced options include Zack Wheeler and Rick Porcello. Washington's Stephen Strasburg could become available if he opts out of the remaining four seasons and $100 million left in his $175 million, seven-year deal. Spending on starting pitching has repercussions on all other decisions for a team that went back above the luxury tax threshold this year after dropping below for the first time in 2018. Shortstop Didi Gregorius, outfielder Brett Gardner and injured reliever Dellin Betances are eligible for free agency, and closer Aroldis Chapman can opt of the final two seasons and $30 million of his contract and go free. Winning their first AL East title since 2012 and finishing the regular season with 103 wins despite 30 players going on the injured list left little satisfaction to a team that finished a full calendar decade without a World Series appearance for the first time since the 1910s. 'It's not a successful season because we're not just playing to get 103 wins and then just sleep,' Gregorius said. 'We want to play to get to the World Series and win it, and that's what we played the whole year for.' Gregorius said his preference is to remain in the Bronx, but the Yankees might not be able to afford him. Their payroll was baseball's second-highest this year behind Boston, and New York might prefer to reallocate Gregorius' salary for pitching rather than make a long-term commitment to a shortstop who turns 30 in February. Gleyber Torres could be shifted to shortstop and DJ LeMahieu, New York's best all-around player in his first season with the Yankees, could take over at second, where he won three Gold Gloves with Colorado. New York navigated through this year despite losing ace Luis Severino to a spring training lat muscle injury that sidelined him until September, Domingo Germán emerged to go 18-4 until a late-season domestic violence incident led Major League Baseball to put him on administrative leave. James Paxton struggled in the first half, rediscovered his breaking ball in the second half and went 15-6, and Masahiro Tanaka (11-9) had a puzzling loss of effectiveness with his splitter. J.A. Happ (12-8) was mostly disappointing and CC Sabathia (5-8) spent four stints on the injured list in his final season. With no other good options, the Yankees used Chad Green as an opener 15 times. Much like Sabathia and A.J. Burnett were added to Andy Pettitte and Joba Chamberlain in 2009, the Yankees could use a front-end injection to lessen the load of a bullpen that despite rest in September tired against the Astros. Adam Ottavino, Tommy Kahnle, Green and Chapman all faltered just enough that New York could not overcome an offense outscored 22-21 over the six games. While the Yankees led the major leagues with 943 runs during the regular season, were second in homers with 306 and topped batting with runners in scoring position at .294, they were .171 (6 for 35) RISP against the Astros, stranded 42 runners, scored 15 of their runs on homers and struck out 64 times. 'I think we're a better team this year than we were last year,' Boone said. 'And we'll work very hard in the winter in every phase, from the front office and the decisions we make with what players we bring in, what players we lose.' Giancarlo Stanton was limited to 18 games in the season and five in the playoffs by enough orthopedic injuries to fill a few screens of WebMD. Aaron Judge strained an oblique that sidelined him for two months, then needed two more months to regain his stroke. Aaron Hicks played in just 59 games during the season due to a spring training back injury and an August elbow injury before making a surprise return against the Astros. Hicks had thought he was headed to Tommy John surgery. 'Right now it feels all right,' Hicks said Saturday night. 'I don't know. We'll see.' Gardner had his best season at the plate at age 36 and could be brought back for another year as insurance to more injuries in the outfield. His wore a shirt under his jersey Saturday that told the story of the Yankees season: 'Next man up.' 'It doesn't matter what was thrown at us,' Gardner said. 'We were able to find a way to push it to side and continue move forward and focus on the task at hand.' Until the Astros proved too much and eliminated the Yankees for the third time in five years. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The New Orleans Saints insisted they were ready for the challenge once Drew Brees went down. All they've done since is back up their words with wins. Teddy Bridgewater threw for 281 yards and two touchdowns, and the Saints improved to 5-0 without their injured star quarterback by beating the Chicago Bears 36-25 on Sunday. The Saints (6-1) again showed why they still see themselves as Super Bowl contenders even though their star quarterback is out indefinitely because of a torn ligament in his right thumb. Bridgewater completed 23 of 38 passes, Michael Thomas had nine receptions for 131 yards, and Latavius Murray ran for 119 yards and two touchdowns. 'I think Teddy's just playing the way he knows how to play,' Murray said. 'I don't think he's trying to replace Drew. He's just come in and been himself. That's all you can ask because Teddy's had success before. This is nothing new to him. He's been a successful quarterback at this level. He's done a heck of a job, obviously, and he's been undefeated.' Besides Brees, New Orleans had to get by without top running back Alvin Kamara (ankle, knee) and top receiving tight end Jared Cook (ankle). Both players were ruled out Friday, but that didn't stop the NFC South leaders from taking down the Monsters of the Midway. 'You look at us overall — offensively, defensively, the kicking game — we're playing elite football right now,' Bridgewater said. 'Of course, it's not as pretty as we'd like it to be. But it's working for us.' STRUGGLING BEARS The Bears (3-3) lost their second straight, with Mitchell Trubisky struggling after missing a game because of a shoulder injury. They were hoping their prized quarterback would build on a solid showing in Week 3 against Washington, when he threw for three touchdowns. Instead, he was erratic, made poor decisions and heard it from the crowd. Trubisky finished 34 of 54 with 251 yards and two late touchdowns in his first appearance since he was hurt early against Minnesota on Sept. 29. He said his shoulder was fine, but the offense sure is not. The run game was once again an afterthought, with Chicago setting a franchise low with seven carries. And the 17 yards rushing were by far the fewest this season. 'We just have no rhythm,' Trubisky said. 'It's not about pointing fingers. We're struggling as an offense.' About all the fans had to cheer for was a 102-yard kickoff return by Cordarrelle Patterson in the first quarter that matched the second-longest in franchise history. But after losing at Oakland in London two weeks ago, it was another rough outing for the Bears. They gave up a season-high 424 yards while being held to 252 and managed just four first downs through the first three quarters. It added up to their fifth straight loss to the Saints, and a 1-2 record at Soldier Field this season. BREAKING IT OPEN With a 12-10 halftime lead, the Saints drove 75 yards for a touchdown on the opening drive of the third quarter. A wide open Ted Ginn Jr. hauled in a 45-yard pass and Murray ran it in from the 3 on the next play. New Orleans then wasted a big opportunity after Chicago's David Montgomery lost a fumble on the next drive. The Saints took over at the Bears 29, only to have Wil Lutz come up short on a 52-yard field goal — his second miss of the day after he made 13 of 14 in the first six games. But Taysom Hill caught a 4-yard touchdown with just under three minutes remaining in the third to make it 26-10. And the Saints stayed in control the rest of the way. BREES BACK Saints coach Sean Payton kept quiet about a possible return date for Brees. 'I'll fill you guys in day by day,' he said. 'We're not targeting. We'll see how he's doing. We'll give you the news when we feel like we're ready to.' MANY HAPPY RETURNS Patterson's kickoff return for a touchdown was the seventh of his career, tied for third in NFL history behind only Josh Cribbs and Leon Washington, who each had eight. He's the first player to have a kick return for a score at Soldier Field since he did it in Week 7 of last season while with New England. Patterson has three career kick return TDs at the Bears' home, breaking a tie with former Chicago stars Devin Hester and Dennis Gentry for the most all-time since the team moved to the stadium in 1971. INJURIES Saints: CB Eli Apple came up clutching his right knee after his leg buckled trying to defend Javon Wims on a touchdown catch near the end of the game. He said his foot got stuck in the grass and there was 'just an awkward feeling.' Apple didn't want to talk about any tests. And Payton did not have an update. ... CB Patrick Robinson hurt a hamstring in the first half. Bears: S Sherrick McManis (concussion protocol) left early in the third quarter. He was hurt blocking on a kickoff return. UP NEXT Saints: Host Arizona next Sunday. Bears: Host the Los Angeles Chargers on Sunday. ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Eric Cooper, the Major League Baseball umpire who worked the AL Division Series two weeks ago, has died. He was 52. Commissioner Rob Manfred announced Cooper's death Sunday. Cooper died after having a blood clot. He had knee surgery earlier in the week and was recuperating at his father's home in Iowa. Popular with his fellow umps, he was talking to them Saturday about his recovery. Cooper made his debut in the majors in 1996 as a minor league fill-in and joined the big league staff in 1999. His most recent assignment came in the playoffs this month when he worked the New York Yankees' sweep of Minnesota in the ALDS. He was at second base on Oct. 7 for the clinching Game 3 at Target Field. Cooper worked the 2014 World Series between the Kansas City Royals and San Francisco Giants. He drew that post helped by his success rate on replay challenges — MLB took those numbers into account in picking the crew, and Cooper had only three calls reversed all season. Cooper umpired in 10 division series, four League Championship Series and the 2005 All-Star Game, along with two World Baseball Classics. He also was behind the plate for three no-hitters — two by Mark Buehrle, including a perfect game, and another by Hideo Nomo. Cooper worked the plate in the final game in the career of Cal Ripken Jr. 'This is a very sad day across Major League Baseball,' Manfred said in a statement. 'Eric Cooper was a highly respected umpire, a hard worker on the field and a popular member of our staff. He also served as a key voice of the MLB Umpires Association on important issues in our game.' In a statement, players' union chief Tony Clark said: 'Eric Cooper's friendly and familiar presence in the baseball community will be missed by all of us. He was a professional and gentleman whose passion for our game, the players and his fellow umpires was evident in the way he went about his work and life.' Cooper was an Iowa native and Iowa State graduate. He was known for rooting for another school — Notre Dame, and frequently wore Fighting Irish gear in the umpires' locker rooms while talking about the football team's success. ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The Tennessee Titans came up with an amazing goal-line stand stopping the Los Angeles Chargers. Not once, twice but thrice. Each time, they needed the replay official to overturn the call on the field turning what the Chargers thought were a pair of go-ahead touchdowns and a final ruling that gave the ball — and the game — to the Titans. Jurrell Casey recovered a fumble by Melvin Gordon at the goal line with 15 seconds left, and Tennessee pulled out a 23-20 victory Sunday over the Chargers after a frantic final minute. Gordon initially was ruled down shy of the goal line at the 1. Casey came out of the pile with the ball, and the Titans started celebrating. The play was reviewed and overturned the on-field ruling that Gordon was short of the goal line. The call was a fumble forced by Titans linebacker Wesley Woodyard that was recovered by Casey for a touchback. Ryan Tannehill knelt down to run out the clock as the Titans (3-4) snapped a two-game skid. 'Once I felt the ball come out, I'm like 'I got to recover it. I got to recover it,'' Casey said. 'And shoot. Sure enough the ball sat in my hands. Kind of popped out for a quick second, and I thought I was about to lose it. Kind of panicked for a moment. If I let them recover it, that's a TD.' The Chargers thought they had scored the go-ahead touchdown not once but twice in the final 44 seconds only to lose both on review by the replay official. That official also overturned Gordon being stopped on the Chargers' final play. 'You don't get 1 yard, you don't deserve to win the damn game, and that's the way it is,' Chargers coach Anthony Lynn said. 'We had 1 yard to win this game, and we let it slip out of our hands.' First, Philip Rivers' pass that Austin Ekeler took 16 yards was ruled a touchdown only to be reversed by the replay official for not breaking the plane as he was tackled by Kenny Vaccaro and Logan Ryan at the 1. After a false start, Malcolm Butler then was flagged for defensive pass interference on Mike Williams in the end zone. Then Gordon went over right tackle with 34 seconds left for what officials ruled a 1-yard TD, and the replay official then reversed the call for the second time in what became a run for no gain. That set up Gordon's final run with 19 seconds left. 'They obviously saw enough to overturn it,' Rivers said. 'I just didn't.' Titans coach Mike Vrabel said there has to be obvious visual evidence the ball had come out and a clear recovery. 'By the grace of God, we had both of those in that play for it to be able to be overturned,' Vrabel said. Tannehill threw for 312 yards and two touchdowns in his first start since the Titans benched Marcus Mariota looking for a spark on offense. Tannehill came through as the Titans not only won their first game at home this season but posted a season-high 403 yards. He was 23 of 29 to outduel Rivers on a day the 16-year veteran moved to sixth in career passing yards. The Chargers (2-5) have lost three straight and five of their past six. Rivers and the Chargers thought they had pulled off an amazing comeback after trailing 23-13 with 6:39 left. Rivers threw a 41-yard TD pass to Ekeler with 5:09 left. The Chargers stopped Tannehill short on fourth-and-inches near midfield, and Rivers put the Chargers ahead with a 16-yard TD pass to Ekeler inside the final minute. But Ekeler was ruled down short of the goal line to set up an astounding final minute of the game. 'On the field, we won it twice,' Chargers tight end Hunter Henry said. Jeffery Simmons, the No. 19 pick overall in the April draft, also made his NFL debut with a sack and a tackle for loss. Tannehill threw an 8-yard TD pass to Corey Davis just before halftime, and he hit Tajae Sharpe on a 5-yard TD pass with 13:11 left. Derrick Henry put Tennessee up 23-13 with 6:39 left with an 11-yard TD run. The Titans held the Chargers to a pair of field goals by rookie Chase McLaughlin in the first half. CLIMBING THE CHARTS Rivers passed a pair of fellow 2004 draft picks in career passing yards during the second quarter. Rivers needed only 105 yards to pass Eli Manning (56,537) and Ben Roethlisberger (56,545), and he had 77 yards by the end of the first quarter and 158 by halftime to keep climbing that list. He finished throwing for 329 yards and two TDs. INJURIES The Chargers already were banged up on the offensive line with center Mike Pouncey out for the season and left tackle Russell Okung trying to work his way back from the non-football injury list with blood clots. Then left guard Forrest Lamp hurt an ankle midway through the second quarter and was carted from the sideline to the locker room. Dan Feeney moved from center to guard, and Scott Quessenberry came in at center. The Titans lost right tackle Jack Conklin early to an injured right thigh early, and Dennis Kelly replaced him. Jamil Douglas started the third quarter at right guard with rookie Nate Davis hurting a rib. Linebacker Rashaan Evans left late in the first half only to return for the second half. Cornerback Adoree Jackson hurt a foot in the third quarter. UP NEXT Chargers: Continue their two-game road swing at Chicago on Sunday. Titans: Host Tampa Bay on Sunday. ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL ___ Follow Teresa M. Walker at https://twitter.com/TeresaMWalker
  • Lamar Jackson was mad. He was mad about settling for field goals three times in the first half. Mad about a delay-of-game penalty and a 13-yard run on third down when he needed 15 yards. Mad to see Justin Tucker trotting on the field again for a field goal. John Harbaugh saw the anger, so he called timeout and gave Jackson a chance. A critical fourth down would be in the hands of Baltimore's young QB, not on the foot of its kicker. 'I was tired of not scoring,' Jackson said. Running an old-school power play, Jackson rolled in an on 8-yard TD on that fourth-down call. It gave the Ravens the lead for good on their way to a 30-16 win over the Seattle Seahawks on Sunday. Whether it was scrambling away from trouble or designed runs to use his speed, there was no stopping Jackson. He was the best player on the field, outshining Seattle QB Russell Wilson on a day the Seahawks star finally made his first critical mistake of the season. Jackson was especially good in the second half, when he led Baltimore on a pair of crucial scoring drives. He finished with 116 yards rushing and his TD run, 143 yards passing and one of the more impressive victories in his young career. 'I always wanted to play against Michael Vick. I guess I'm getting the new era with Lamar Jackson right there,' Seattle defensive end Jadeveon Clowney said. Earl Thomas made his return to Seattle after nine seasons of playing for the Seahawks, but aside from some occasional barking at the sideline of his former team and running off the field twirling Wilson's jersey over his head after the victory, the former All-Pro safety ceded the spotlight to Jackson. The second-year QB gave the Ravens (5-2) a 20-13 lead on his TD run. On their next possession and backed up deep in their own end, Jackson made a series of highlight plays to drive Baltimore into scoring position for Tucker's fourth field goal and a 10-point lead with 3:47 left. Jackson had a 30-yard run on third-and-8 from the Ravens 12. He scrambled 13 yards for another first down and hit tight end Nick Boyle for a 20-yard completion to get the Ravens inside the Seattle 10. Baltimore went 86 yards in 13 plays and ate 9 minutes off the clock. Jackson completed just 9 of 20 passes on a cold, wet day in the Pacific Northwest. He was hampered by several drops and could have had an even more dynamic performance running if not for footing problems on the wet turf. Jackson changed his shoes twice, eventually going back to his original pair. 'The other ones I put in, the screw-ins, I was running slow ... getting caught by the linebackers,' Jackson said. 'I'm like, 'I got to go back to the original ones because there's no way I can't get caught by no linebackers.' I got mad.' While Jackson was great, he was helped by a defense that held Seattle to three points in the second half and capitalized on two turnovers. Wilson was nearly flawless for the first six games but struggled to find open receivers against Baltimore's physical secondary. Seattle (5-2) was leading 10-6 and driving when Wilson made the mistake of double-clutching and trying to throw late into the flat. Marcus Peters, traded to Baltimore less than a week ago, made a quick break on the throw, stepped in front of Jaron Brown and outraced Wilson 67 yards for his fifth career interception return touchdown, the most of any player since Peters entered the league in 2015. 'That's why we got him. Make plays like that,' Baltimore running back Mark Ingram said. 'He has a knack for getting the ball, a knack for getting in the end zone. Shout out to our GM for getting him because that paid dividends today in getting this victory.' Wilson was 20 of 41 passing for 241 yards and an 8-yard TD in the first quarter to Tyler Lockett. Seattle's last hope of a comeback ended when DK Metcalf fumbled and Marlon Humphrey returned it 18 yards for a touchdown with 3:37 remaining. 'Somewhere you have to make a mistake,' Seattle coach Pete Carroll said. 'How many games are you going to go without making an error like that?' RETURN OF EARL Thomas had a mostly uneventful return and finished with five tackles. He caught up with a handful of his former teammates before the game and signed a few of his Seahawks jerseys still floating around. He exchanged jerseys with Wilson after the game. Thomas was given the game ball after the victory. 'My teammates had been telling me all week they had my back and it felt good for those guys to show up the way they did today,' Thomas said. 'It felt so good to get that win, to come here against an MVP-type quarterback and for the defense to play the way they did today, we are on the right track.' INJURIES Baltimore defensive end Pernell McPhee suffered an arm injury in the first half and did not return. MISSING Several key starters were missing for both teams. Seattle was without starting safety Bradley McDougald (back), defensive end Ziggy Ansah (ankle) and left tackle Duane Brown (biceps). McDougald's absence meant rookie Marquise Blair made his first start and had six tackles. The Ravens were without starting wide receiver Marquise Brown and linebacker Patrick Onwuasor, and top cornerback Jimmy Smith. Brown and Onwuasor both have ankle injuries, while Smith has a knee injury. UP NEXT Ravens: After a bye next week, Baltimore will host New England on Nov. 3. Seahawks: Seattle will travel to Atlanta next Sunday. ___ More AP NFL: https://apnews.com/NFL and https://twitter.com/AP_NFL
  • Denny Hamlin was surrounded by Joe Gibbs Racing teammates at the front on the final restart, and that put Chase Elliott in the most difficult and precarious of situations. Somehow, he figured, he needed to find a way to beat them all to advance in NASCAR's playoffs. It turned out second place was good enough. Hamlin roared away with a push from behind from teammate Kyle Busch on the second shot at a green-white-checkered finish, and Elliott was unable to chase him down. But deep in the field, Brad Keselowski was going backward, and the spots he lost in the elimination race at Kansas Speedway were enough to send Elliott through in the final cut-off spot to the round of eight. Hamlin won the race. Elliott felt almost as if he did. 'You have to stay fighting in these things, especially with the late-race restarts,' he said. 'Just excited we get to fight another race. Back up against the wall, to come out here and battle for the win, that's what you have to do when you're in the position we were in.' In a bit of irony, it was Keselowski who helped bring out the caution in the first overtime when he got into Daniel Suarez and triggered a wreck that collected teammate Joey Logano. The field was nearing the start-finish line but the caution light came on before the leader took the white flag. If Hamlin had crossed a split-second quicker, the race would have been over and Keselowski safe. 'I pushed as hard as I knew how and didn't quite do good enough on the last restart and that was it,' Keselowski said. 'We clawed as hard as we could and there were times it looked like we were going to be fine and times it didn't. In the end it didn't work out.' Kyle Busch ultimately finished third, followed by Kurt Busch and William Byron. But the key was Keselowski, who dropped from 13th to 19th on the final restart and out of the next round of the playoffs. He ended up three points — equal to three positions on the track — below the cutoff line. Byron was the next driver eliminated despite a strong run at Kansas, where he would have needed a win to advance. Alex Bowman and home-state hero Clint Bowyer also were eliminated. 'I did think we were OK,' Keselowski said, 'but obviously we weren't.' The win was the fifth this season for Hamlin, who already was in good shape to advance but picked up valuable playoff points with the win. He'd finished in the top five at Kansas twice in the past couple years, but the trip to victory lane was the first for his Joe Gibbs Racing team since 2012. 'This was a tough track for us. We didn't run very good here in the spring,' said his crew chief, Chris Gabehart. 'We got a few key adjustments that turned us into a dominant car.' The frenzied push to the finish Sunday began when Blaney scraped the wall with 14 to go, causing his tire to go down and a caution flag to fly. Elliott was three points behind Keselowski at that point, but the savior of Hendrick Motorsports' playoff hopes made a big move on the restart to climb to fourth place, and that put the pressure right back on Keselowski to make up ground. Elliott was still in good shape until another caution flew, jumbling the front of the pack and giving Keselowski a chance. He made a quick stop and picked up three spots on pit road, putting Elliott back in a situation where it appeared he would need a victory to advance. 'I was under the impression,' he said. The entire field got through the first playoff restart cleanly, but Keselowski ran out of room deep in the pack and nudged Suarez, sending him into the wall. Logano also was heavily damaged in the wreck, throwing his own playoff hopes into question as another OT approached. Hamlin got a good jump on the restart, and Elliott dived low and got in line. He immediately moved forward into second place while Keselowski began hemorrhaging positions, and the change that was made in the final two laps was enough to send Elliott into the next round. 'If you ever get to Homestead, you're going to have to fight for a win,' he said. 'Proud of the effort. Learned a lot. To be able to come out here and, like I said, in our minds have to win, come and fight for one, to finish second, I think is step in the right direction for us.' OTHER PLAYOFF DRIVERS Bowyer had a strong finish in eighth, but the playoff contender was a non-factor most of the day despite needing a win to advance. Kevin Harvick started 40th after inspection issues and never making it on the track to qualify, but he worked his way through the field to finish ninth. 'That was not a very good weekend from top to bottom,' Harvick said. 'I just didn't have a very good car and didn't have a very good day on pit road. Nothing went right all weekend. It was definitely one of the worst weekends we have had in a while.' ALL THE REST Among non-playoff drivers, Erik Jones was among his three Gibbs playoff teammates in contention for the win before finishing seventh. Jimmie Johnson rallied from a slow start to finish 10th. UP NEXT Keselowski won the spring race at Martinsville, though that probably doesn't make him feel much better returning now that he's outside the playoffs. Logano edged Hamlin in the playoff race a year ago. ___ More AP auto racing: https://apnews.com/apf-AutoRacing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • The Latest on the NASCAR Cup Series elimination race at Kansas Speedway (all times local): 4:55 p.m. Denny Hamlin has won the chaotic NASCAR Cup Series elimination race at Kansas Speedway on Sunday, holding off Chase Elliott on a second overtime restart to pick up some extra playoff points. Elliott managed to finish second and advanced to the round of eight on points when Brad Keselowski, whom he'd been dueling with all afternoon, got boxed in on the restart and lost too many spots. In a bit of irony, it was Keselowski who helped bring out the caution on the first try of the green-white-checkered finish when he got into Daniel Suarez. The field was nearing the start-finish line but the caution light came on before the leader took the white flag, forcing a second overtime. Kyle Busch wound up third, followed by Kurt Busch and William Byron. But the key was Keselowski, who dropped from 13th to 19th on the restart and out of the next round of the playoffs. ___ 3:30 p.m. Denny Hamlin further solidified his spot in the round of eight of NASCAR's playoffs, dominating the second stage of Sunday's Cup Series elimination race at Kansas Speedway. While Kyle Larson and Ryan Blaney have assured their spot in the next round, Hamlin was leading the 12 playoff drivers in the point standings coming into the race. Blaney was second in the stage as playoff drivers swept the top eight spots. Martin Truex Jr. was third, William Byron and Hendrick Motorsports teammate Chase Elliott were next, and Kevin Harvick and Joey Logan were next before non-playoff driver Paul Menard. ___ 2:45 p.m. Joey Logano got a big push from Chase Elliott on a restart with two laps left in the first stage, then held on to grab valuable playoff points in NASCAR's elimination race at Kansas Speedway. The caution flag flew Sunday when Ryan Newman tagged the wall, setting up a two-lap sprint for the final stage. Ryan Blaney led Clint Bowyer to the green flag on the restart, but the field went five-wide down the back stretch and Logano took advantage of the chaos. He raced to the front on the outside with Elliott right behind him. That's how they finished the stage, with Daniel Suarez third and playoff contenders Martin Truex Jr., Kyle Busch, Brad Keselowski and Denny Hamlin picking up points in their effort to advance. Bowyer was the big loser, falling from second all the way back to 21st. ___ 1:40 p.m. Daniel Hemric is on the pole alongside David Ragan on Sunday, but all the action figures to happen behind them when the elimination race for NASCAR's playoffs begins at Kansas Speedway. Ryan Blaney starts third and Kyle Larson is fifth, though both of them already have secured a spot in the round of eight by virtue of their wins at Talladega and Dover. Denny Hamlin, Martin Truex Jr. and Kyle Busch appear to be in good shape on points, and Kevin Harvick has a nice buffer even though he'll start last. Harvick had trouble going through inspection on Saturday and never made it onto the track for a qualifying run. Brad Keselowski, who will start fourth, and Penske Racing teammate Joey Logano are the last two drivers on the good side of the cut line. Alex Bowman, Chase Elliott, Clint Bowyer and William Byron are on the outside and could need a victory to advance in the playoffs. ___ More AP auto racing: https://apnews.com/apf-AutoRacing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports