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    Keith Thurman certainly seems like more than the modern Manny Pacquiao should be able to handle. Thurman (29-0, 22 KOs) is a decade younger, certainly more powerful and maybe even a bit faster than his famously speedy opponent. Thurman is a tough, voluble welterweight champion in his prime competitive years, and Pacquiao represents the biggest fight of his career — a once-in-a-lifetime chance to pound a boxing great into retirement. 'It's been a build up and a progression my whole career toward this moment on Saturday night,' Thurman said. 'This really is the outcome of an individual living out their dream.' So why are the 40-year-old Pacquiao (61-7-2, 39 KOs) and trainer Freddie Roach so confident heading into the MGM Grand Garden in Las Vegas? And why is the older eight-division champion actually a slight betting favorite against one of the best 147-pounders in the world? After 18 years together, Pacquiao and Roach believe Thurman is just another challenge to be overcome by hard work, smart planning and the psychological edge of experience. Thurman looks daunting on paper, but Pacquiao and Roach are virtuosos on canvas. 'Tomorrow night, class is in session,' Pacquiao said Friday after the weigh-in. 'I hope Keith Thurman studied hard, because Professor Pacquiao gives very hard tests.' Pacquiao and Thurman both hold versions of the WBA 147-pound title heading into this Fox Sports pay-per-view showdown. In Roach's educated mind, the vaunted Thurman has far more questions to answer than Pacquiao, who is coming into this fight off back-to-back victories over Lucas Matthysse and Adrien Broner. Can Thurman recapture his prime fighting form after two years of relative inactivity caused by a 22-month injury layoff? Can he match Pacquiao's legendary speed while showing the stamina to fight effectively for 12 rounds against Manny's famed pace? 'I hope Thurman brings his best, because that's when Manny will be at his best,' Roach said. 'Thurman is a good fighter, but Manny beats good fighters all the time. And I don't think Keith Thurman is a great fighter. I think Broner is a better fighter, and Manny took care of him (easily).' While Thurman is in the biggest bout of his career, the Filipino senator's late-career resurgence also reaches a vital point Saturday. Despite what Roach says, Thurman seems certain to be a big step up in competition from Matthysse and Broner, and the cumulative effects of a boxing career rarely wear well after 40. 'Manny isn't going to do anything with those little T-Rex arms,' Thurman said. 'He's about to get beat up. I get to punch a senator in the face, and he's going to feel it.' Thurman earned the nickname 'One Time' with his one-punch knockout power, yet he has stopped just one of his seven opponents since December 2013. And though Thurman is still in his ostensible prime, he has shown a few signs of weariness with his sport. He has never looked more vulnerable as a professional than he did in his comeback victory last January over tough veteran Josesito Lopez, who rocked Thurman repeatedly and even won a 10-8 round without a knockdown. More recently, Thurman has repeatedly spoken about how he's eager to get a few big paydays and then get out of boxing — a sensible mentality that nonetheless could indicate a fighter's focus isn't completely on competition anymore. Thurman has been totally focused in public appearances for this big-money bout, however. 'I'm going to do to Manny Pacquiao what he did to Oscar De La Hoya,' Thurman said, referring to Pacquiao's landmark victory over the Golden Boy in 2008. While Thurman would love to retire his opponent, Pacquiao plans to keep competing indefinitely, and he doesn't dismiss the notion of fighting to 50 and beyond, as Bernard Hopkins did. He has openly looked beyond Thurman to his hopes of a second fight with the retired Floyd Mayweather, or a unification bout with champion Errol Spence. But just in case anybody believes he isn't focused on Thurman, Pacquiao said that even his mother took offense at Thurman's pre-fight trash talk , including his vow to 'crucify' the vocally evangelical Pacquiao. 'I'm just always smiling, no matter what Keith says,' Pacquiao said. 'It's easy to say things, but it's not easy to do it in the ring. I've been in this sport longer than Keith Thurman, so my experience will be the difference.' ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/tag/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Cydney Clanton and Jasmine Suwannapura shot a 7-under 63 in alternate-shot play Friday to open a five-stroke lead in the Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational, the LPGA Tour's first-year team event. Clanton and Suwannapura birdied five of the last seven holes on the front nine and played the last five holes in 2 under, making three birdies and a bogey. 'I think because we pretty chill, like 'You hit a bad shot, like OK, I'll fix it, don't worry,'' Suwannapura said. 'So everybody kind of like relaxing the game today, so the result pretty good.' They had a 16-under 194 total at Midland Country Club, with a best-ball round left Saturday. 'Each hole's an opportunity,' Clanton said. 'How many opportunities can we give ourselves. One of those things where as many fairways and greens as you can hit and if the putts go in, great.' Suwannapura, from Thailand, won the Marathon Classic last year for her lone LPGA Tour title. Clanton is winless on the tour. They had an alternate-shot 67 on Wednesday and shot a best-ball 64 on Thursday. 'Today, I think what we did was quite impressive just with our ball-striking in general,' Clanton said. 'Jasmine's putting's on point. I think you've just got to look at it as it's just another opportunity to play and the more that you can think of the fact that it's just another day on the golf course, we're going to go out and try to do what we've been doing, the better it's going to be.' Sisters Ariya and Moriya Jutanugarn had a 64 to move into a tie for second at 11 under with Simin Feng-Ruixin Liu (67), Na Yeon Choi-Jenny Shin (67) and Paula Creamer-Morgan Pressel (69). 'I felt like first round, don't want to miss any shot because I don't want my sister to have like tough shot and I kind of worry and scared,' Ariya Jutanugarn said. 'But today we already make the cut and nothing to lose, so we keep playing golf.
  • Rory McIlroy's salvage operation began as a quest to regain respectability. Keeping his ball in play off the first tee was a good way to start. By the time he reached the back nine, it had become something very different. McIlroy was on the charge in a British Open at Royal Portrush — a sensation he'd dreamt of for so long — and it felt like all of Northern Ireland was behind him as he walked the links on the North Atlantic coast. 'Rory, we love you,' shouted a female fan beside the 14th green after he made a fourth birdie in five holes. 'We're with you all the way, Rory,' cried one man after McIlroy holed a 10-foot putt for another birdie at No. 16, nicknamed Calamity Corner. McIlroy just needed one more birdie on the last hole to make the cut and complete one of the great redemption tales of this storied event. It wasn't to be. 'I didn't play my part,' McIlroy said after a par at No. 18 meant he finished one stroke below the cut line at 1 over, despite a 6-under 65 that tied the best round of the week. 'But everyone in Northern Ireland came out to watch me and played theirs.' In the end, that shocking opening-round 79 did too much damage. That tee shot at the first that went out of bounds. That missed putt from barely a foot at No. 16, something McIlroy deemed 'inexcusable.' That sloppy triple bogey at the last that sagged his shoulders even more. That was all forgotten by the locals a day later. The spine-tingling roar McIlroy received from the grandstands as he walked down the 18th fairway, the clock having passed 8 p.m. and the light fading, will stay with him forever. McIlroy struggled to hold back the tears in his post-round interviews. High up in his thoughts was the feeling that he had connected with his fellow natives who so rarely see Northern Ireland's most famous active sportsman in the flesh. 'Sometimes you're so far away and you forget about all the people that are cheering you on back home,' said McIlroy, who lives in south Florida. 'And then you come and play in front of them. It definitely hit me like a ton of bricks today.' The pre-tournament betting favorite to hold the claret jug on Sunday, McIlroy began his second round as a 500-1 outsider and needing something comparable to the 61 he shot as a 16-year-old amateur to simply make the weekend. A long birdie putt at No. 3 and a 15-footer for another birdie at No. 7 gave him only an outside chance heading to the turn. Then McIlroy accelerated. A birdie at No. 10 was followed by another at the 11th after an approach to 2 feet. A tap-in birdie at the par-5 12th left him only two shots from safety and it felt as if every spectator on the Dunluce Links had converged to watch McIlroy's group, which also contained U.S. Open champion Gary Woodland and England's Paul Casey. McIlroy found the bunker off the 13th tee and left his 12-foot par putt short for his only bogey of the day, making his task that much harder. Three birdies were required from the final five holes, the first arriving from 15 feet at No. 14 after an approach which left McIlroy holding his pose. Whoops of joy from beer-swilling spectators greeted his birdie putt from 10 feet at No. 16, and fans even cheered McIlroy as he ducked out for a bathroom break on the side of the 17th fairway. He pulled his birdie putt on the 17th green, to massive groans. McIlroy had one more chance. But from the middle of the 18th fairway, McIlroy hit his approach left and the ball landed on a mound to the side of the green and rolled down the slope. He leaned on his iron, shook his head, and shaped with his left hand the way he wanted to hit that shot. Only a chip-in would keep McIlroy at Royal Portrush for an extra two days, but his attempt swerved left. Still, his putt for par was received like he had rolled in the winning putt on Sunday. 'It's a moment I envisaged for the last few years. It just happened two days early,' McIlroy said. 'Today was probably one of the most fun rounds of golf I've ever played. It's strange saying that standing here and having had a bit of success and won this championship before, and just to be battling to make the cut.' McIlroy remains stuck on four majors, his drought in golf's biggest events certain to extend to a sixth year. Friday's round was a reminder, though, of how big a draw McIlroy is, especially back on home soil. 'Even as a competitor and trying to beat the guy every week, sometimes I have to step back and realize how great Rory McIlroy is for golf,' Justin Thomas tweeted. 'How he handles the spotlight, the highs, the lows, his social life, the fans, his golf, everything.. it's awesome to watch.' ___ More AP golf: https://apnews.com/apf-Golf and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports ___ Steve Douglas is at www.twitter.com/sdouglas80
  • The two most important spots on a football team are the coach and the quarterback. Ohio State has questions at both. The Buckeyes aren't the only powerhouse program with uncertainty in the Big Ten's East Division. Michigan and Michigan State each have a new offensive coordinator, and Penn State has to find a replacement for quarterback Trace McSorley, a sixth-round pick of the Baltimore Ravens. For the Buckeyes, Ryan Day has taken over for Urban Meyer, who resigned after seven seasons and a national championship. Day was the offensive coordinator and has already gotten a taste of being in charge on the sidelines: Last season began with a three-game suspension for Meyer following an investigation into his handling of allegations of domestic abuse against former assistant Zach Smith. 'I think the easy thing to do is to ask how are you different than Urban Meyer, and that's not something I really like to answer because first off, you don't replace a legend,' Day said Thursday at Big Ten football media days. 'You don't replace one of the best football coaches in the history of the game. What you can do is just be yourself, and I think that's what I'm doing.' Senior wide receiver K.J. Hill said the two coaches have similar approaches but Day is less intense. '(Meyer) was more of an old-school coach,' he said. 'Coach Day is going to ask for the same thing but it's more in a laid-back way. We respect both coaches and there's no difference. Instead of yelling and screaming at you, (Day's) just going to demand it in an asking way. I've had it the opposite way my entire life, so this doesn't faze me.' Hill is just 48 catches from breaking David Boston's school record. The question remains: Who will throw him the ball? Dwayne Haskins broke every major Ohio State single-season passing record, and nearly every Big Ten single-season passing record last year en route to finishing third in the race for the Heisman Trophy. Day is hesitant to name a starter, but Georgia transfer Justin Fields is the presumed starter over Kentucky transfer Gunnar Hoak. 'He has a strong arm,' Hill said of Fields. 'He had to get used to the receivers, the routes, a different offense, but I feel like Justin can bring a lot to the offense because he can use his legs a little more than Dwayne did last year. A lot more RPOs (run-pass-option) in the running game, so I feel like he brings a lot to the offense.' Rival Michigan hired former Alabama wide receivers coach Josh Gattis as its offensive coordinator. Gattis spent one season as Nick Saban's co-offensive coordinator and wide receivers coach. He previously coached for six years under James Franklin at Vanderbilt and Penn State. Gattis, 34, is considered one of the elite, young offensive minds in the sport, but he is embarking on the biggest job of his young career. '(I've) been watching coach Gattis since he was at Western Michigan and followed his career,' Michigan coach Jim Harbaugh said. 'I felt he was just very decisive. ... We've been learning from him. He's got a great system.' Michigan State also has a new offensive play-caller with Brad Salem the new offensive coordinator. Dave Warner and Jim Bollman, who previously shared the role, were reassigned to position coaches. Salem, who is entering his 10th season as an assistant, also is back to coaching running backs, which he did from 2010-12 before taking over as quarterbacks coach in 2013. The Spartans were 13th in the conference in scoring last season, averaging only 18.7 points a game. They finished 7-6 and lost to Oregon in the Redbox Bowl, 7-6. '(I've) been very, very impressed with the way we've gone about our business since the bowl game,' head coach Mark Dantonio said. 'We're excited about '19.' Michigan State this year hosts Penn State, a program that is also looking to fill a rather large hole on the offensive side of the ball after the departure of McSorley. 'Obviously, whenever you lose a quarterback that played as many games and started as many games as Trace McSorley did for us and was able to win at such a high level, obviously there's question marks going into the season,' Franklin said. 'But we've been fortunate to be able to recruit extremely well. Very confident in the way we developed that position, as well, and we think we're going to have great competition.' Franklin said he anticipates redshirt sophomore Sean Clifford and redshirt freshman Will Levis competing for the starting job. ___ Keith Jenkins can be reached at https://twitter.com/MrKeithJenkins ___ More AP college football: https://apnews.com/Collegefootball and https://twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • A look at the key hole Friday in the second round of the British Open: Hole: 18 Par: 4 Yards: 474 Stroke average: 4.2 Ranking: 3rd Key Fact: Rory McIlroy came to the 18th needing a birdie to play on the weekend. He settled for par to finish off a 6-under 65 that left him one shot off the cut. Shane Lowry bogeyed the final hole, dropping back into a tie for the lead with J.B. Holmes at 8 under.
  • IndyCar points leader Josef Newgarden has spent much of the season holding off a hard-charging Alexander Rossi. Indianapolis 500 winner Simon Pagenaud looks poised to make the chase for the championship a three-car affair. Pagenaud moved 22 points closer to Newgarden, his Team Penske teammate, after leading 80 of 85 laps in a dominant win in Toronto last weekend. Pagenaud and the No. 1 Chevrolet now trail Newgarden by just 39 points and Rossi by 35 heading into Saturday night's race at Iowa Speedway. Pagenaud put further pressure on Newgarden and Rossi by winning the pole Friday for the second week in a row. The 35-year-old Frenchman beat Will Power, also of Team Penske, and Newgarden to capture his third pole of 2019 and his 13th overall. 'I'm definitely happy to be ahead of my teammates,' Pagenaud said. 'Josef is my competition this year, so I've got to grab any points I can get. Be aggressive, show authority.' Pagenaud hit a bit of a wall following his memorable win at the Indianapolis 500 in late May. He went four straight races finishing no better than sixth, a run that threatened to nullify the points advantage he picked up in Indianapolis. But the No. 22 team found something in last weekend's performance in Canada, and Pagenaud could be tough to beat if he can bring the speed he had in qualifying to Saturday's race. Iowa will be just the third oval of the season, with Pagenaud (Indianapolis) and Newgarden (Texas) taking the first two races. No one has ever won an IndyCar race from the pole in 12 tries at Iowa's 0.875-mile short track, but Pagenaud is on a roll heading into the race. 'I've been saying that I want to live in the moment this year,' Pagenaud said. 'Do it step by step and just be in the moment as much as I can, and it's working. So just now, I'm at the level I've always wanted to be in.' Newgarden wasn't happy on Friday despite qualifying third in a performance that he flatly said 'wasn't good enough.' Newgarden has had plenty of success at Iowa though — including one of the most dominant runs in recent memory. He led 282 out of 300 laps, a record that still stands, to win in Newton three years ago for Ed Carpenter Racing. Newgarden was the third-fastest in qualifying despite having issues coming through the opening turn. Turn '1 was probably the tough one for us. We didn't have the balance that we needed through there,' Newgarden said. 'But the car was good. I think the Hitachi car has been fast. Chevy has done a tremendous job. We should have what we need, I think, for tomorrow.' Rossi will start sixth in his No. 27 Honda, which was four MPH slower than Pagenaud's pace. But Rossi has been nearly as hot as Pagenaud of late, winning at Road America on June 23 before finishing third a week ago. 'The Penske cars have looked really strong, which is unfortunate,' Rossi said. ___ More AP auto racing: https://apnews.com/tag/apf-AutoRacing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Maximum Security is going to have to share top billing in the $1 million Haskell Invitational at Monmouth Park with an unexpected foe — broiling heat. The National Weather Service has issued an excessive heat warning for the Monmouth County through Sunday night, adding a seventh rival for the only horse to cross the finish line first in the Kentucky Derby and then be disqualified. The forecast calls for temperatures to hit 95 degrees with heat index values reaching as much as 106. 'Our priority will be the safety of the horses, jockeys and our fans,' said Dennis Drazin, the chairman and chief executive of Darby Development LLC, operators of track on the New Jersey shore. 'We will be in contact with the state veterinarians, and if we feel it's unsafe for horses there are things we can do.' The track has set up misting fans in the paddock and saddling areas for the 14-race card. It will employ shorter post parades before the start of races to limit track time for the horses. Drazin also said there is the possibility the Haskell might be delayed if it is too hot, possibly pushing it back an hour or so to 7 p.m. EDT. With racing under pressure because of many horse deaths horses in California, several tracks Friday canceled their Saturday cards, including Saratoga Race Course and Finger Lakes in New York and Laurel Park in Maryland. The Haskell Invitational is the signature event of the Monmouth Park meet, and this year's race could establish Maximum Security as the leader in the 3-year-old thoroughbred season that has produced one surprise after another. Each Triple Crown race had a different winner. If Maximum Security wins Saturday, he will be the only 3-year-old colt with two Grade 1 victories this year, having captured the Florida Derby in March. It would have been three had he not been disqualified in the Kentucky Derby. Trainer Jason Servis is feeling more confident heading into this 1 1/8 mile race than he did last month when the colt finished second to trainer Todd Pletcher's King for a Day in the Pegasus at Monmouth. Servis said horses tend to have rollercoaster cycles and the Pegasus wasn't surprising, especially after the colt stumbled at the start. Maximum Security, with jockey Luis Saez, drew the outside No. 7 post and is the 8-5 morning-line favorite in a field filled with speed. Hall of Fame trainer Bob Baffert, eyeing a record ninth Haskell win, is running Mucho Gusto. The 2-1 second choice is coming off two impressive wins in California, including one in the Affirmed on June 16. Regular rider Joe Talamo will break the colt from the No. 5 position. King for a Day is the 5-2 third choice. Jockey John Velazquez will replace Joe Bravo, who filled in for him in the Pegasus. The colt drew the No. 1 post, which means he probably will have to go right to the lead. After King for a Day, the rest of the field, in post-position order with jockey and odds, is: Joevia, Jose Lezcano, 10-1; Spun to Run, Paco Lopez, 15-1; Bethlehem Road, Luis Castro Rodriguez, 20-1; Mucho Gusto, Talamo, 2-1; Everfast, Julien Leparoux, 10-1; and Maximum Security, Saez, 8-5. Post time is scheduled for 5:47 p.m. EDT. The race will be televised by NBC.
  • Yankees manager Aaron Boone expected to be suspended following his profane rant at a rookie umpire and opted to serve his one-game ban against the Colorado Rockies on Friday night. Boone aimed a memorable tirade at plate umpire Brennan Miller following his ejection during a doubleheader opener against Tampa Bay on Thursday. MLB executive Joe Torre announced Friday that Boone had been suspended one game and fined, neither of which surprised Boone, who acknowledged making contact with Miller with the bill of his cap. 'I figured I'd be getting a call at some point from Mr. Torre,' he said. 'And I did.' Boone was ejected in the second inning for arguing from the dugout with Miller, who had called a third strike on Brett Gardner. The rant was captured by television microphones, and Boone's repeated reference to his hitters as 'savages' in the batter's box went viral and was being sold online on T-shirts before the game ended. Tensions were running hot in New York's dugout, where Gardner left dents in the roof by repeatedly slamming his bat into it. Boone said he sensed someone was going to be ejected and decided to make sure it was him instead of one of his players. 'Sometimes you try to divert attention from you players, so that's going to happen,' he said. 'But also understanding that I don't want to just let it rip, especially language-wise. My kids look at me funny, and you do have a responsibility.' Boone added that 'some of the foul language, I'm not real proud of.' Yankees players praised Boone for stepping in, with slugger Luke Voit saying 'we appreciate it, and we are a bunch of savages.' The outburst was also widely celebrated by Yankees fans. Miller was umpiring just his fifth big league game behind the plate. Boone said he was impressed by Miller's poise through the ordeal. 'Brennan yesterday I thought certainly handled the situation with a lot more class than I did, but also I thought turned in a really good game,' Boone said. 'I respect the job they have to do.' ___ Follow Jake Seiner: https://twitter.com/Jake_Seiner ___ More AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • A report examining the U.S. Olympic system urges a move away from the 'money for medals' funding system and a reconfigured board of the U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee that would give more power to athletes. The document was requested by the USOPC and was delivered this week by a committee led by former WNBA Commissioner Lisa Borders. The 113-page report comes in the aftermath of the the Larry Nassar sex-abuse scandal and the resignation or removal of most of the federation's top employees. The report delved into the relationship between the USOPC and the national sports federations (NGBs) it oversees. Most of its suggestions dealt with giving athletes a greater role and more access to funding, but didn't recommend how to pay for them. It calls for a reconfiguration of policies developed over the past 20 years: In 2003, the board was reduced from more than 120 to 12 to 15 people. About seven years later, more emphasis was placed on using medal potential as the primary factor in determining how much money to give NGBs. The money given to the NGBs is earmarked for athlete support. The Borders Report recommended changing this focus, and basing the formula more on strategic plans that outline how the NGBs will account for athlete safety and support. 'Although maintaining such medal driven programs is important, other programmatic funding and support programs must be offered to NGBs based on the USOPC's approval of an NGB's strategic plan and high-performance plan and its performance in accordance with such plans,' the report said. Committee members interviewed 62 people, some having 'significant and serious concerns about possible retaliation for helping the Commission,' the report said. 'Such fears highlight a lack of trust relative to the USOPC of the recent past and the NGBs,' the report said. It suggested the USOPC hire outsiders to conduct annual assessments to 'monitor the evolution toward a more athlete-centric' organization. The commission called for more athletes on the USOPC board by 2024, and for all of the federation's committees, working groups and task force to have at least 20 percent athlete representation — a figure that has been adhered to in many instances for decades. The commission also suggested an overhaul and expansion of the USOPC's 'limited and byzantine athlete health care' and for a direct-funding pipeline to athletes — two projects that would cost millions for an organization that receives no government funding. While acknowledging some of its recommendations could be costly, the committee said 'the USOPC has an 'opportunity to reflect and self-evaluate in real time.' The USOPC has made some governance changes since CEO Sarah Hirshland took over last year; many have been designed to give athletes a bigger say and easier pathways to lodge complaints. But critics say none of this has gone far enough and want yet another overhaul of the board and management. 'With changes to governance and personnel, policies and procedures — and most importantly, culture — we are a very different organization than we were one year ago,' Hirshland said. 'But we have more work to do.
  • A question that first seemed pie-in-the-sky is growing in credibility with each additional ride that takes him toward Paris: Could Julian Alaphilippe carry the yellow jersey glued ever more firmly to his shoulders all the way to the Tour de France finish on the Champs-Elysees? With the Tour's toughest climbs looming from Saturday, Alaphilippe pretends not. But it's becoming increasingly difficult to believe him. Having had no excuse to uncork champagne since it last had a Tour winner in 1985, France will soon need to start thinking about icing the bubbly if he keeps surprising everyone, even himself. Inspired by his yellow jersey, Alaphilippe delivered the biggest shock so far in this Tour by holding off defending champion Geraint Thomas to win the only individual time-trial stage on Friday, extending his race lead and ratcheting up French hopes for a first homegrown champion since Bernard Hinault won his fifth title 34 years ago. Roared on by crowds thunderously hammering on roadside barriers, and super-motivated on the 100th birthday of the iconic yellow shirt, Alaphilippe delivered a barnstorming performance on the tricky, hilly, turn-filled time-trial loop south of Pau, with spectacular views of the Pyrenees. Having previously predicted that he'd lose time to Thomas, an expert in the race against the clock, Alaphilippe stunned even himself by emphatically relegating the Welshman into second place, 14 seconds slower — a surprising margin of victory in a discipline where riders train in wind tunnels and ride go-fast bikes in go-fast skinsuits to shave off time. 'It's incredible,' Alaphilippe said, adding that his performance reduced members of his team to tears. 'I was transported by the maillot jaune.' His second stage victory of this Tour — he also was victorious on Stage 3 — came 100 years to the day since the Tour first awarded a yellow jersey, to Frenchman Eugène Christophe on July 19, 1919. Stage 3 was also where Alaphilippe first took the race lead. He then lost it on Stage 6, got it back on Stage 8 and hasn't let anyone else near it ever since. But between Alaphilippe and Paris are two huge obstacles: The Pyreenees and the Alps, with a total of seven climbs to above 2,000 meters (6,500 feet) still to come in the highest Tour in the race's 116-year history. The first of those monsters is the Tourmalet on Saturday. Alaphilippe's sizeable lead of 1 minute, 26 seconds over Thomas could melt like the Pyrenees' last snows in the July heat if he cracks on the long uphill finish and, next week, in the Alps. 'There's a long way to go and a lot of hard stages to come now,' Thomas said. But Thomas, too, was among those stunned by Alaphilippe's sustained power on the 27-kilometer (17-mile) time-trial route, where he was quickest through all the checkpoints and then rode explosively up the final climb to grow his winning margin. 'I didn't really expect that,' Thomas said. 'He's obviously going incredibly well, so he's certainly the favorite and the one to watch.' Mindful of how quickly the Tour's mountains can destroy podium hopes, Alaphilppe furiously sought to temper expectations, repeating that he is thinking only 'day by day.' 'One mustn't dream,' Alaphilippe said. Given the doping-stained history of cycling and the Tour, Alaphilippe also immediately faced a question in his winner's news conference about the believability of his performance, which he batted away, seemingly unruffled. 'If it creates suspicions, that's the way it is,' he said. 'I'm just riding my bike in the way I like.' Having continued to confound expectations with his punchy riding and gritty determination to stay in yellow, Alaphilippe is converting others in the peloton to the idea that he could ride up the Champs-Elysees in the lead on July 28. 'He can surprise everybody,' said Belgian rider Thomas De Gendt, third on Stage 13 and 36 seconds slower than Alaphilippe. Behind Thomas and Alaphilippe, there was significant movement in the overall standings among other riders also fighting to get on the podium. Steven Kruijswijk from the Netherlands, fifth in Paris last year, vaulted to third overall. But his deficit to Alaphilippe grew to 2:12, having been just 1:27 off the lead before the French rider's time-trial tour de force. Thomas' teammate, Egan Bernal, slipped from third to fifth overall, now 2:52 behind Alaphilippe. Having started the Tour in Belgium as equal co-leader with Bernal on their team, Thomas looks increasingly like the undisputed No. 1 at Ineos. The no-holds-barred performance from Alaphilippe rewarded him for taking risks on the course that proved too difficult for some other riders. Belgian Wout van Aert, a Tour rookie who won Stage 10, plowed into a roadside barrier and crashed in a right-hand curve close to the finish. He'd been one of the quickest riders on the course before hitting the deck. Medics treated him at the side of the road and then transported him away by ambulance. His team, Jumbo-Visma, said van Aert was conscious but out of the Tour with a flesh wound on his right upper leg. ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports