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The parents of a 2-year-old Texas girl are behind bars after police reportedly found the toddler's remains in a bucket authorities believe was filled with acid. According to The Associated Press, Monica Yvonne Dominguez and Gerardo Zavala-Loredo, both of Laredo, were arrested last week on charges of tampering with evidence and abusing a corpse. Authorities also charged Dominguez with two counts of endangering a child, the AP reported. >> Read more news stories Dominguez said her daughter, Rebecka, drowned in the tub Thursday afternoon while bathing with another child, according to prosecutors. Dominguez said the children were unsupervised at the time, authorities said. Prosecutors said Dominguez sought Zavala-Loredo's help to dispose of the girl's remains, which police found in a bucket inside a closet, the AP reported. Dominguez is being held on $175,000 bond, while Zavala-Loredo is being held on $125,000 bond, according to the AP. Read more here. — The Associated Press contributed to this report.
The family of a British teenager who ran away to join the Islamic State group said Sunday she has given birth to a baby boy. The family's lawyer said that 19-year-old Shamima Begum and her latest baby are in good health. Begum is living in a refugee camp in northern Syria and wants to return to Britain with her child. Begum was one of a group of schoolgirls from London's Bethnal Green neighborhood who went to Syria to marry IS fighters in 2015 at a time when the group's online recruitment program lured many impressionable young people to its self-proclaimed caliphate. She told The Times newspaper that her first two babies had died of illness and malnutrition. She told the newspaper she does not regret her decision to join the extremists, who have lost virtually all of the territory once under their control in Syria and Iraq. Her legal situation remains unclear. She may face charges for supporting the banned extremist group. Two days before the baby's birth was announced, Begum's family in Britain said they were 'shocked' by her comments but said she should be brought back to Britain and dealt with under the British justice system. 'The welfare of Shamima's unborn baby is of paramount concern to our family, and we will do everything within our power to protect that baby, who is entirely blameless in these events,' the family said in the statement. The family said it is concerned about Begum's mental health and characterizes her as having been groomed by Islamic State fighters.
Marcel Hirscher swept into the finish area and wagged his finger triumphantly in front of the camera. The message was clear: The ski king is back. The Austrian produced an emphatic response to relinquishing his giant slalom title two days earlier at the world championships by taking a 0.56-second lead after the first run of the slalom on Sunday. Only Alexis Pinturault of France was within a second of Hirscher, who was on course to win a record-tying seventh career gold medal at the worlds. Marco Schwarz of Austria was in third place, 1.22 seconds off the lead. Hirscher, the seven-time overall World Cup champion, showed no ill-effects from the cold that has been affecting him this week. After the giant slalom on Friday, he said he would be going straight back to bed to rest up for the slalom. He looked in good working order on Sunday. As the third skier on the course, Hirscher took 1.70 seconds off No. 2 starter Henrik Kristoffersen, who beat Hirscher to GS gold on Friday, and more than two seconds off Clement Noel, who came to the worlds in form after wins in Wengen and Kitzbuehel. Save for Hirscher crashing, only Pinturault looks capable to denying the Austrian a third slalom gold at the worlds — something only the great Ingemar Stenmark has achieved. Pinturault was only 0.06 seconds behind Hirscher at the third checkpoint but he went wide at the first turn on the final descent and lost half a second. 'I'm still in the fight,' Pinturault said, 'and still have a chance in the second leg. That's the essential (thing).' Daniel Yule of Switzerland was 0.28 behind Hirscher at the last split before falling at the start to the final descent. Hirscher also won the slalom at the 2013 and 2017 worlds. A seventh career gold at the worlds would tie the men's record held by compatriot Toni Sailer from the late 1950s. Austria, a storied Alpine skiing nation, needs Hirscher to deliver in the final event to avoid finishing the world championships without a gold medal for the first time since Crans Montana, Switzerland, in 1987. The women's team has already finished with no medals and that hasn't happened since Schladming, Austria, in 1982. The second run starts at 2.30 p.m. (1330 GMT). ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
Pope Francis is asking for prayers for this week's sex abuse summit at the Vatican, calling abuse an 'urgent challenge of our time.' He has summoned bishops to Rome to help him chart a way forward after decades of abuse by priests and prelates and the systematic cover-ups of that by their superiors. The scandals have eroded Catholics' trust in the Vatican and in church leaders like bishops. Francis told pilgrims and other visitors Sunday in St. Peter's Square that beginning Thursday, the heads of episcopal conferences worldwide will discuss 'protection of minors in the church.' He said: 'I ask prayers for this appointment, which I wanted as an act of strong pastoral responsibility in the face of an urgent challenge of our time.
Actor Alec Baldwin's Donald Trump impression was back in the spotlight this weekend as 'Saturday Night Live' took on the president's national emergency declaration. >> Trump signs funding bill to avoid government shutdown, declares emergency to build border wall In Saturday's cold open, Baldwin's Trump laid out his case for building a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border. >> Watch the clip here 'Let's cut to the chase: Folks, we need wall, OK? We have a tremendous amount of drugs flowing into this country from the southern border, or 'the brown line' as many people have asked me not to call it,' he said, adding: 'You can all see why I gotta fake this national emergency. I have to because I want to.' >> Read more trending news  Baldwin's Trump then launched into a lengthy explanation of his plan. 'I'm basically taking military money so I can has wall,' the fake Trump said. 'So I'm going to sign these papers for emergency, then I'll immediately be sued, then the ruling will not go in my favor, then end up in the Supreme Court, then I'll call my buddy [Brett] Kavanaugh, and I'll say, 'It's time to repay the Donny,' and he'll say, 'New phone, who this?' And then the [Robert] Mueller report will be released, crumbling my house of cards, then I can just plead insanity and do a few months in the puzzle factory, and my personal hell of playing president will finally be over.' >> See the full sketch here (WARNING: Viewer discretion advised) When Kyle Mooney, playing CNN reporter Jim Acosta, said undocumented immigrants commit fewer crimes than people born in the U.S., Baldwin's Trump was incredulous. 'Oh my God, Jim, those numbers are faker than this emergency,' he replied. 'Anyway, in conclusion, this is a total emergency, a five-alarm blaze, which means I gotta go to Mar-a-Lago, so I can play some golf.' Read more here.
Paris authorities opened an investigation Sunday into anti-Semitic remarks hurled at a noted philosopher during a yellow vest protest in the capital, an incident that raised national concerns about the movement's ascendant radical fringe. The Paris prosecutor's office said Sunday an investigation was launched into 'public insult based on origin, ethnicity, nationality, race or religion.' A few demonstrators targeted philosopjer Alain Finkielkraut with insults on the sidelines of a yellow vest protest through Paris on Saturday. The shocking incident prompted criticism from French President Emmanuel Macron and other prominent figures. Meanwhile, yellow vest demonstrators called for multiple rallies around Paris and some other French cities Sunday, including a march expected to start at the Arc de Triomphe monument. The increasingly divided movement has held protests every Saturday since Nov. 17, but some groups are holding rallies this Sunday to celebrate the movement's 3-month birthday. An online invitation to Sunday's main Paris march says 'Let's stay peaceful.' Police fired tear gas and brought in water cannons and a horse brigade to disperse yellow vest protesters Saturday in Paris. The movement, which began as protests against a fuel tax hike, has broadened to include a range of concerns about France's living standards and the economic stresses facing ordinary families. Its name comes from the fluorescent yellow vests that French motorists must keep in their cars for emergencies.
Hundreds of passengers throughout Europe have been stranded by the abrupt collapse of the British regional airline Flybmi. British Midland Regional Limited, which operates as Flybmi, said it's filing for administration — a British version of bankruptcy — because of higher fuel costs and uncertainty caused by Britain's upcoming departure from the European Union. 'Current trading and future prospects have also been seriously affected by the uncertainty created by the Brexit process, which has led to our inability to secure valuable flying contracts in Europe and a lack of confidence around bmi's ability to continue flying between destinations in Europe,' the airline said on its website late Saturday. The airline thanked workers for their dedication and said 'it is with a heavy heart that we have made this unavoidable announcement.' The airline operated 17 jets on routes to 25 European cities. It employed 376 people in Britain, Germany, Sweden and Belgium and says it carried 522,000 passengers on 29,000 flights last year. Pilots union chief Brian Strutton said the airline's collapse came with no warning and 'is devastating news for all employees.' 'Our immediate steps will be to support Flybmi pilots and explore with the directors and administrators whether their jobs can be saved,' he said. Britain is scheduled to leave the EU on March 29 but there are serious doubts about whether the British Parliament will approval the Brexit withdrawal deal that Prime Minister Theresa May negotiated with the EU. That is making it more difficult for businesses to plan for the separation. Flybmi said all flights will be cancelled and advised passengers to seek refunds from credit card issuers, travel agents or travel insurance companies. Passengers were told not to travel to the airport Sunday unless they had made arrangements directly with other airlines. Flybmi said it would not be rescheduling passengers on other airlines' flights. Many passengers were left stranded by the shutdown. Hannah Price told Sky News she was planning to return Monday to Britain from Brussels on Flybmi. 'Unfortunately for me, I was supposed to be flying home with them in less than 48 hours to Bristol. I don't think that's going to happen now,' she said. The collapse will have a major impact on the Northern Ireland city of Derry, also known as Londonderry, which will lose its only air connection to London. Officials at the City of Derry Airport said they were urgently seeking a new carrier to keep the link open. Flybmi was still seeking customers up until the day before its collapse, urging people in a tweet to book flights to Germany for a winter sports holiday.
If you plan your evening’s alcohol consumption by the old wives’ tale “beer before wine and you’ll feel fine; wine before beer, have fear,” then you might wake up tomorrow feeling awful. Researchers at Witten/Herdecke University in Germany and at the University of Cambridge put the saying to the test to determine if the order in which you imbibe beer and alcohol makes a difference. Their study, published Feb. 8 in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, divided 90 volunteers into three groups. To get the groups as equally likely to be drunk as possible, participants were divided into groups of “triplets” based on similar age, gender, body composition, alcohol drinking habits and hangover frequency. Each triplet was then randomly assigned to one of the three larger groups. >> On AJC.com: Many hangover 'cures' are merely myths >> On AJC.com: Do you drink too much? Here’s what a new study says >> On AJC.com: Taking a break from alcohol can improve sleep and weight, study says On the first day of the study, group one was served beer before wine; group two drank wine before beer; and group three was served one or the other, but not both. A week later, groups one and two switched their order of consumption, and those who drank wine in group three drank beer while who had beer on day one drank wine. The volunteers, ages 19-40, drank until they reached a breath alcohol concentration of 0.11 percent.  The day after each party, er ... test, participants scored their hangover symptoms — thirst, fatigue, headache, dizziness, nausea, stomach ache, tachycardia (elevated heart rate) and loss of appetite — on a scale of zero to 7, with zero being no symptoms. The results? There was no difference in hangover intensity based on the order of alcohol consumption. >> Read more trending news  They were “unable to confirm that the well-known folklore of drinking ‘beer before wine’ purportedly results in a worse hangover than drinking ‘wine before beer,'” their report stated. The researchers admitted the study had limitations, including an inability to create a control group that drank only nonalcoholic beer or wine.  “When they tried to, QZ.com reported, “participants expressed ‘real dissatisfaction and envy’ about not being in the ‘ever-so-happy booze-sipping study groups’—even trying surreptitiously to sneak in.” Abstaining from alcohol is the only sure way to avoid a hangover, researchers said, adding that “perceived drunkenness and vomiting are useful predictors of misery in the morning after the night before.”
The Latest on skiing world championships (all times local): ___ 11:55 a.m. Marcel Hirscher took a 0.56-second lead in the slalom at the world championships in a brilliant response to missing out on gold in the giant slalom two days ago. Only Alexis Pinturault of France was within a second of Hirscher, who was on course to win a record-tying seventh career gold medal at the worlds. Marco Schwarz of Austria was in third place after the first run, 1.22 seconds off the lead. Henrik Kristoffersen, who beat Hirscher to GS gold on Friday, was 1.70 seconds back in sixth. Hirscher showed no effects from the cold that has been affecting the Austrian this week. Results weren't official as lower-ranked skiers were yet to finish. The second run starts at 2.30 p.m. (1330 GMT). ___ 10:55 a.m. Austria, a storied Alpine skiing nation, needs Hirscher to deliver in the final event to avoid finishing the world championships without a gold medal for the first time since Crans Montana, Switzerland, in 1987. The women's team has already finished with no medals and that hasn't happened since Schladming, Austria, in 1982. The conditions are overcast for Hirscher's tilt at the title. ___ 10:50 a.m. Mikaela Shiffrin defied illness to win the slalom at the skiing world championships. Can Marcel Hirscher do the same? Hirscher, the seven-time overall World Cup champion, will start as the favorite for the last medal event of these championships, even though he is still nursing a cold he picked up midway through the week. Feeling under the weather, the Austrian finished second behind Henrik Kristoffersen in the giant slalom on Friday. They trained together on Saturday. If Hirscher wins the slalom for a third time, he will move on to seven career golds at the worlds — tying the men's record with compatriot Toni Sailer from the late 1950s. ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
Mikaela Shiffrin defied illness to win the slalom at the skiing world championships. Can Marcel Hirscher do the same? Hirscher, the seven-time overall World Cup champion, will start as the favorite for the last medal event of these championships, even though he is still nursing a cold he picked up midway through the week. Feeling under the weather, the Austrian finished second behind Henrik Kristoffersen in the giant slalom on Friday. They trained together on Saturday. If Hirscher wins the slalom for a third time, he will move on to seven career golds at the worlds — tying the men's record with compatriot Toni Sailer from the late 1950s. ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
Europeans need to do more than talk if they want to preserve a deal meant to keep Tehran from obtaining a nuclear weapon after the unilateral withdrawal of the United States, Iran's foreign minister said Sunday, slamming Washington as the 'biggest source of destabilization' in the Middle East. Mohammad Javad Zarif told a gathering of world leaders, top defense officials and diplomats that a barter-type system known as INSTEX set up last month by France, Germany and Britain to allow businesses to skirt direct financial transactions with Iran, and thereby evade possible U.S. sanctions, is not enough. 'Many around the world, particularly on this continent, speak eloquently about multilateralism, but they also need to walk the walk,' Zarif told the Munich Security Conference in an impassioned address. 'For instance, INSTEX falls short of the commitments by the (European countries) to save the nuclear deal. Europe needs to be willing to get wet if it wants to swim against a dangerous tide of U.S. unilateralism.' The three European nations, as well as Russia, China and the European Union as a whole, have been struggling to save the 2015 deal with Iran since President Donald Trump announced the unilateral American withdrawal last year and re-imposed sanctions. The deal promises Iran relief from sanctions in exchange for limiting its nuclear program, and so far the International Atomic Energy Agency has said Tehran has been living up to its obligations. Those working to preserve the agreement have been trying to walk a fine line between mollifying Iran without angering Washington. Zarif's comments appeared directed at European assurances that INSTEX could concentrate on products not currently subject to U.S. sanctions, such as medicine, medical supplies, and agricultural goods, rather than on broader trade. On Saturday, U.S. Vice President Mike Pence slammed INSTEX, and urged others to abandon the nuclear deal entirely. 'The time has come for our European partners to stop undermining U.S. sanctions against this murderous revolutionary regime,' Pence said before leaving Germany. 'The time has come for our European partners to stand with us and with the Iranian people, our allies and friends in the region. The time has come for our European partners to withdraw from the Iran nuclear deal.' Before Pence spoke, German Chancellor Angela Merkel defended the Iran deal, saying that while she shared concerns about Iran's missile program and regional ambitions, it was important to keep 'the small anchor we have in order maybe to exert pressure in other areas.' Merkel's comments, and her defense of global diplomacy instead of go-it-alone foreign policy, drew lengthy applause. Zarif told the conference that Pence had 'arrogantly demanded that Europe must join the United States in undermining its own security and breaking its obligations' and urged them to push back against American pressure. 'If the United States were to come, in the course of their fight with China, and tell Europe to stop dealing with China, what would you do?' he asked. 'Whatever you (would) want to do then, do now in order to prevent that eventuality.' He would not comment on whether the nuclear deal will survive without the U.S. but said Iran was not prepared to renegotiate it as Trump has suggested. 'Nothing can be done that is better than this deal,' he said. 'It's not all we want and it's certainly not all the United States wants but it's the best that can be achieved.' Responding to Pence's comments that Iran was the 'greatest threat to peace in the Middle East,' Zarif said the U.S. had an 'unhealthy fixation' with Iran and was itself the 'single biggest source of destabilization in our neighborhood.' 'The U.S. claims, and unfortunately some blindly parrot, that it is Iran which is interfering in the region, but has it ever been asked whose region?' Zarif said. 'Just glimpse at a map for a second — the U.S. military has traveled 10,000 kilometers to dot all our borders with its bases. There is a joke that it is Iran's fault that it put itself in the middle of all (the) U.S. bases.' ___ Geir Moulson in Berlin contributed to this report.
Islamic State militants are preventing more than 1,000 civilians from leaving a tiny area still held by the extremist group in a village in eastern Syria, a spokesman for the U.S.-backed Syrian militia fighting the group said Sunday. 'Regrettably, Daesh have closed all the roads,' Mustafa Bali, a spokesman for the Kurdish-led Syrian Democratic Forces, told The Associated Press, referring to IS by its Arabic acronym. SDF officials have said the extremists are hiding among civilians in a tented village and using a network of caves and tunnels. IS, which once ruled a proto-state in large parts of Syria and Iraq, is clinging to an area less than a square kilometer (square mile) in the village of Baghouz, in eastern Syria. The extremists may include high-level commanders, and could be holding hostages among those trapped inside. Occasional coalition airstrikes and clashes continue inside the village of Baghouz. Artillery rounds were meant to clear land mines for the SDF fighters to advance. SDF commanders say the end of IS' self-declared caliphate is near. 'We will very soon bring good news to the whole world,' Ciya Furat, an SDF commander, said Saturday at a news conference at the al-Omar Oil Field Base, miles away from Baghouz in the Deir el-Zour province. The capture of the last pocket of territory held by IS in either Syria or Iraq would mark the end of a devastating four-year global campaign to end the extremist group's so-called caliphate. At the height of their power in 2014, the extremists controlled nearly a third of both countries. But experts and U.S. defense officials warn that the group still poses a major threat and could regroup within six months if pressure is not kept up.
A biennial arms fair has opened in the United Arab Emirates as the country faces increasing scrutiny over its involvement in the Saudi-led war in Yemen. While the war went unmentioned at the opening ceremony of the International Defense Exhibition and Conference in Abu Dhabi on Sunday, it was clearly present in the theatrical show offered to spectators. In it, a militia threatens an unknown country with both launchpad-based and mobile ballistic missiles. Saudi Arabia has faced over 100 such launches by Yemen's Houthi rebels into the kingdom. Saudi Arabia and the UAE are the leading members of a coalition that has been at war with the Iran-aligned Houthis since March 2015. The conflict that has killed tens of thousands of people and caused the world's worst humanitarian crisis.
Country music star Miranda Lambert has found love again. The 'Mama's Broken Heart' singer took to social media Saturday to tell fans that she secretly married Brendan Mcloughlin. >> Read more trending news  'In honor of Valentine’s Day I wanted to share some news,' Lambert, 35, wrote in a Facebook post. 'I met the love of my life. And we got hitched! My heart is full. Thank you Brendan Mcloughlin for loving me for.... me.' >> See the Facebook post here According to People magazine, Mcloughlin is an officer with the New York Police Department and has a 3-month-old child from a former relationship. Lambert was previously married to country singer and 'The Voice' coach Blake Shelton from 2011 to 2015.  Read more here.
A Georgia father has been arrested after deputies say his 2-year-old ate meth.  Keith Edward Teubner Sr. of Spalding County was charged with cruelty to children in the second degree, possession of methamphetamine, possession of marijuana and other charges.  >> Read more news stories  Deputies were called to WellStar Spalding Regional Hospital on Thursday on reports that a child had eaten methamphetamine.  Deputies got a warrant for Teubner's home on Greer Road, where they found drugs in the bedroom, authorities said. Deputies also learned Teubner knew his child had ingested the drug but didn't seek medical care, authorities said. It's unclear who took the toddler to the hospital.  The child was turned over to the Division of Family and Children's Services. 
Among those trying to win the Daytona 500 this year are a Florida watermelon farmer, a short-track champion from New England, a television analyst and a 22-year-old whose career nearly was derailed by a brain tumor. The front row is the youngest in Daytona 500 history and it will be William Byron, a Liberty University student who had his wisdom teeth removed in the offseason, leading the field to green in Sunday's showcase race to kick off the NASCAR season. The overall look of the nation's top racing series has undergone a transformation the last few seasons and proof is plastered on the hood of Corey LaJoie's car. His full facial-haired face adorns his Ford Mustang, which easily makes him the most recognizable driver among the eight Daytona 500 rookies in the field. 'He looks like he's going to eat you every lap,' quipped Clint Bowyer. LaJoie's paint scheme for his low-budget team is courtesy of sponsor Old Spice, which chose 'The Great American Race' to promote its dry shampoo. Manscaped.com bought the space on the back of Landon Cassill's car, Bubba Wallace signed Aftershokz headphones for the race. After Casey Mears made the field — his first race in two years — skateboard rim maker Rim Ryderz joined his program. This Daytona 500 is unlike any in recent memory and truly highlights the dramatic loss of star power from just four years ago. The 2015 race featured Jeff Gordon, Dale Earnhardt Jr., Tony Stewart, Matt Kenseth, Carl Edwards, Bobby Labonte, Michael Waltrip and Danica Patrick. All are now retired. Some of the big-money sponsors in that race included Lowe's, Target, Dollar General, GoDaddy and 5-Hour Energy. All have since pulled out of NASCAR. What remains is a new-look NASCAR that nonetheless has a throwback feel. NASCAR was built on the premise that if a budding driver or team owner could scrape together the funds to field a car, they could bring it down to the beach and try to make the big show. As the sport exploded past its Southern origins, it became nearly impossible for a new driver to claw his way into a ride. But change has created opportunity — even second and third chances for a guy like Ross Chastain. The eighth-generation watermelon farmer impressed a sponsor with his work ethic and landed a career-changing ride with unexpected funding. Federal agents raided the sponsor right before Christmas, but Chastain still managed to land a seat for his first Daytona 500. Ryan Preece bounced back and forth between NASCAR and New England short tracks before finally gambling on his future. He settled for a part-time job with a competitive team because he believed he could show his true talent if given the right equipment. Now he's also a Daytona 500 rookie. Same with Matt Tifft, who learned he had a brain tumor four races into his 2016 season. Or Daniel Hemric of Kannapolis, North Carolina, who followed hero Dale Earnhardt Sr. from the old mill town into a ride with Richard Childress Racing. Parker Kligerman, a part-time racer and full-time television personality, raced his way into his second Daytona 500. 'Watching this race last year, I literally thought I'd never drive a Cup car again, never have another chance in the Daytona 500,' Kligerman said. 'I'm doing TV full-time. It just didn't seem like I was really getting anyone's attention. For whatever reason, I just couldn't find the right opportunity, couldn't find a sponsor.' 'I went off and did the TV thing. You've seen drivers do that before, where they do something to up their profile, then they get back in a ride. It kind of feels like it's finally all starting to work.' Kligerman works for NBC Sports and so does Earnhardt Jr., his broadcast partner who will drive the first pickup truck to pace the race. It is an unexpectedly heavy NBC Sports promotion in a race broadcast by rival Fox. Despite all the hardscrabble hopefuls who at various times figured they'd never make it to NASCAR's biggest stage, the super teams still exist and the stars are the favorites. Hendrick Motorsports and its four fast Chevrolets at the start of Speedweeks went 1-2-3-4 in time trials. Byron, who is 21, and 25-year-old teammate Alex Bowman swept the front row for qualifying and gave Chevrolet an early boost in its effort to defend last year's Daytona 500 victory with Austin Dillon . Still, Ford drivers swept both podiums in the pair of 150-mile qualifying races to load rows two, three and four with the brand new Mustang. Ford competed last year with the Fusion, winning 19 of 36 races and its first Cup title in 14 seasons, and is eager to make an immediate statement with its sportier new race car. Kevin Harvick and Joey Logano, previous Daytona 500 winners, led the Ford charge. Logano and Team Penske teammate Brad Keselowski are listed as 8/1 favorites in betting lines. Jimmie Johnson ended a 19-month losing streak with a victory in a Speedweeks exhibition race, but he triggered a 16-car accident while making his race-winning pass. Then contact with Kyle Busch in a qualifying race increased the scrutiny around Johnson, who has a new sponsor Ally Financial and a new crew chief for the first time since his 2001 debut. The Toyota bunch has yet to stand out from the crowd, which doesn't bother Martin Truex Jr. His 0-for-14 skid in the in the Daytona 500 is longest among active drivers, but he knows he's got a chance Sunday. 'Out of the 40 cars, how many have a legit shot at winning? Probably 25,' he said. ___ More AP auto racing: https://apnews.com/apf-AutoRacing and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
It's said that history often repeats itself — the first time as tragedy, the second as farce. Many Britons feel they are living through both at the same time as their country navigates its way out of the European Union. The British government awarded a contract to ship in emergency supplies to a company with no ships. It pledged to replace citizens' burgundy European passports with proudly British blue ones — and gave the contract to a Franco-Dutch company. It promised to forge trade deals with 73 countries by the end of March, but two years later has only a handful in place (including one with the Faroe Islands). Pretty much everyone in the U.K. agrees that the Conservative government's handling of Brexit has been disastrous. Unfortunately, that's about the only thing this divided nation can agree on. With Britain due to leave the EU in six weeks and still no deal in sight on the terms of its departure, both supporters and opponents of Brexit are in a state of high anxiety. Pro-EU 'remainers' lament the looming end of Britons' right to live and work in 27 other European nations and fear the U.K. is about to crash out of the bloc without even a divorce deal to cushion the blow. Brexiteers worry that their dream of leaving the EU will be dashed by bureaucratic shenanigans that will delay its departure or keep Britain bound to EU regulations forever. 'I still think they'll find a way to curtail it or extend it into infinity,' said 'leave' supporter Lucy Harris. 'I have a horrible feeling that they're going to dress it up and label it as something we want, but it isn't.' It has been more than two and a half years since Britons voted 52 percent to 48 percent to leave the EU. Then came many months of tense negotiations to settle on Brexit departure terms and the outline of future relations. At last, the EU and Prime Minister Theresa May's government struck a deal — then saw it resoundingly rejected last month by Britain's Parliament, which like the rest of the country has split into pro-Brexit and pro-EU camps. May is now seeking changes to the Brexit deal in hope of getting it through Parliament before March 29. EU leaders say they won't renegotiate, and accuse Britain of failing to offer a way out of the impasse. May insists she won't ask the EU to delay Britain's departure, and has refused to rule out a cliff-edge no-deal Brexit. Meanwhile, Brexit has clogged the gears of Britain's economic and political life. The economy has stalled, growing by only 0.2 percent in the fourth quarter as business investment registered a fourth straight quarterly decline. Big political decisions have been postponed, as May's minority Conservative government struggles to get bills through a squabbling and divided Parliament. Major legislation needed to prepare for Brexit has yet to be approved. Britain still does not have a deal on future trade with the EU, and it's unclear what tariffs or other barriers British firms that do business with Europe will face after March 29. That has left businesses and citizens in an agonizing limbo. Rod McKenzie, director of policy at the Road Haulage Association, a truckers' lobby group, feels 'pure anger' at a government he says has failed to plan, leaving haulers uncertain whether they will be able to travel to EU countries after March 29. McKenzie says truckers were told they will need Europe-issued permits to drive through EU countries if Britain leaves the bloc without a deal. Of more than 11,000 who applied, only 984 — less than 10 percent — have been granted the papers. 'It will put people out of business,' McKenzie said. 'It's been an absolutely disastrous process for our industry, which keeps Britain supplied with, essentially, everything.' He's not alone in raising the specter of shortages; both the government and British businesses have been stockpiling key goods in case of a no-deal Brexit. Still, some Brexit-backers, such as former Daily Telegraph editor Charles Moore, relish the prospect of a clean break even if it brings short-term pain. 'Perhaps it is time for a Brexit recipe book, like those comforting wartime rationing ones full of bright ideas for dull things,' Moore wrote in The Spectator, a conservative magazine. He added that he and his neighbors were willing to 'set out in our little ships to Dunkirk or wherever and bring back luscious black-market lettuces and French beans, oranges and lemons.' Brexit supporters often turn to nostalgic evocations of World War II and Britain's 'finest hour,' to the annoyance of pro-Europeans. The imagery reached a peak of absurdity during a recent BBC news report on Brexit, when the anchor announced that 'Theresa May says she intends to go back to Brussels to renegotiate her Brexit deal,' as the screen cut to black-and-white footage of World War II British Spitfires going into battle. The BBC quickly said the startling juxtaposition was a mistake: The footage was intended for an item about a new Battle of Britain museum. Skeptics saw it as evidence of the broadcaster's bias, though they disagreed on whether the BBC was biased in favor of Brexit or against it. Some pro-Europeans have hit back against Brexit with despairing humor. Four friends have started plastering billboards in London with 20-foot-by-10-foot (6-meter-by-3-meter) images of pro-Brexit politicians' past tweets, to expose what the group sees as their hypocrisy. Highlights included former U.K. Independence Party leader Nigel Farage's vow that 'if Brexit is a disaster, I will go and live abroad,' and ex-Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson's pledge to 'make a titanic success' of Brexit. The friends dubbed the campaign 'Led by Donkeys,' after the description of British soldiers in World War I as 'lions led by donkeys.' The billboards are now going nationwide, after a crowdfunding campaign raised almost 150,000 pounds ($193,000). 'It was a cry of pain, genuine pain, at the chaos in this country and the lies that brought us here,' said a member of the group, a London charity worker who spoke on condition of anonymity because their initial guerrilla posters could be considered illegal. A similar feeling of alienation reigns across the Brexit divide in the 'leave' camp. After the referendum, Harris, a 28-year-old classically trained singer, founded a group called Leavers of London so Brexiteers could socialize without facing opprobrium from neighbors and colleagues who don't share their views. It has grown into Leavers of Britain, with branches across the country. Harris said members 'feel like in their workplaces or their personal lives, they're not accepted for their democratic vote. They're seen as bad people.' 'I'm really surprised I still have to do this,' she said. But she thinks Britain's EU divide is as wide as it ever was. 'There can't be reconciliation until Brexit is done,' she said. Whenever that is. ___ Follow Jill Lawless on Twitter at http://Twitter.com/JillLawless . Follow AP's full coverage of Brexit at: https://www.apnews.com/Brexit
Bill before Congress would expand 3 Georgia historic sites Lawmakers mull medical pot cultivation, drones near prisons Georgia bill would replace state's outdated voting machines Patrick Caddell, pollster to Jimmy Carter, dies at 68 21 Savage 'wasn't hiding' being British, feared deportation
David Ryan Adams is a 44-year-old singer-songwriter born in Jacksonville, North Carolina. He has had a long career across multiple genres and musical acts. He is also the subject of a New York Times expose on numerous accusations he psychologically abuses women. Background Adams first came on the music scene in an alt-country band he founded called Whiskeytown. The group released three major albums, making it big with “Strangers Almanac” in 1997. The group split in 2000, after what a Guardian story called a “particularly gruesome Michigan show.” >> Ryan Adams covers Bryan Adams and the internet can't get enough Solo career Adams’ first solo album, “Heartbreaker,” was a hit, especially with critics. A Pitchfork review called it “a startling 15-song masterpiece.” His follow-up, “Gold,” was also a hit and earned him three Grammy nominations. However, as the Guardian article put it, “Then something went askew… (he) got a reputation for being a boozy, druggy brat.” At one point, Adams left a scathing message with profanities on the answering machine of the music critic for the Chicago Sun-Times. Since then he has performed with the band The Cardinals and done more solo work. He is known for his 2015 release “1989,” a song-for-song alt-country cover album of Taylor Swift’s album “1989.” He is a prolific producer, working with Willie Nelson and Fall Out Boy. He has also worked with Weezer, Norah Jones and Counting Crows. Abuse allegations On Wednesday, the New York Times published a story detailing allegations of abuse against Adams. “In interviews, seven women and more than a dozen associates described a pattern of manipulative behavior in which Adams dangled career opportunities while simultaneously pursuing female artists for sex,” Joe Coscarelli and Melena Ryzik wrote. >> Read more trending news  For example, 20-year-old musician Phoebe Bridgers told the Times that Adams invited her to his studio. She said he praised her music, and the two had a short relationship. However, she said, when she broke off the relationship, Adams rescinded an offer to be the opening act on his European tour. One of the women who talked to the Times was Adams’ ex-wife, actress and singer Mandy Moore. She said he psychologically abused her and blocked her progress as a musician. They divorced in 2016. Megan Butterworth, who was engaged to Adams recently, also called him “controlling and emotionally abusive.” She told the Times he tried to isolate her “socially and professionally.” They broke up in 2018. Adams allegedly corresponded with a fan as well, starting when she was 14. She said he exposed himself during video calls on Skype.  According to texts reviewed by the Times, Adams questioned her about her age and sometimes she gave a false, older one.  In one text, he told the girl,” And tell me that your mom is not gonna kill me if she finds out we even text.”  Adams called the article “inaccurate.” Read more here.
The victims of a disgruntled employee who opened fire at a suburban Chicago industrial warehouse were co-workers ranging from an intern to the plant manager. A look at the victims: TREVOR WEHNER The 21-year-old Northern Illinois University student was on his first day as an intern in human resources at Henry Pratt Co. in Aurora and attended the fateful meeting where the gunman was fired and then started shooting. Jay Wehner said his nephew grew up about 30 miles (50 kilometers) south of Aurora in Sheridan and was expected to graduate from Northern Illinois University in May with a degree in human resource management. He was on the dean's list at NIU's business college. 'He always, always was happy,' Jay Wehner said. 'I have no bad words for him. He was a wonderful person. You can't say anything but nice things about him.' RUSS BEYER Ted Beyer said his son had a 'big heart' and tried his best to make his office a better place. He told the Chicago Sun-Times that's why the 20-year mold operator and union chairman sat in on Gary Martin's termination meeting Friday afternoon. Ted Beyer said his son had helped Martin win back his job months earlier. Russ Beyer was shot outside the meeting 'He was a hard worker, just like I was,' Ted Beyer, 71, said of his son. 'I loved him ... We were close. He was my first kid.' Russ Beyer had followed in the footsteps of his father, a previous union chairman who worked at Henry Pratt Co. for four decades. Ted and his 46-year-old son enjoyed camping, fishing and swimming together, usually at Taylorville Lake in central Illinois. They also shared one more connection: Ted Beyer had also previously vouched for Martin in grievance meetings with management. Beyer remembered Martin as a kind, caring man who brought him coffee and walked with him following back surgery. But, Beyer said, that doesn't take away the pain of losing Russ, the oldest of three children, who also had two adult children of his own. 'Anybody who knew him knew he had a big heart,' Ted Beyer said of his son. 'I just recently lost my sister and now this and, you know, it hurts. It's just like somebody reached in there and took your heart out.' CLAYTON PARKS The 32-year-old from Elgin, about 20 miles (32 kilometers) north of Aurora, had just joined Henry Pratt in November 2018 as HR manager responsible for operations in Aurora, Illinois, Hammond, Indiana and Denver, the company said. He also was in the meeting where the gunman was being fired from his job. Parks was married and had an infant son Axel, according to a Facebook post by his wife Abby. 'Every time I've closed my eyes over the last twelve hours, I've opened them hoping to wake from a terrible dream, but that's not the case,' Abby posted. 'I'm living my worst nightmare. My husband, my love, my best friend.' Parks was a 2014 graduate of the Northern Illinois University College of Business. VICENTE JUAREZ Neighbors remembered Vicente Juarez as a hard-working grandfather and rock of his tight-knit family. Juarez was shot outside the meeting where the gunman was being fired from his job. Juarez had been employed at Henry Pratt since 2006 and was a member of the shipping and warehouse team in Aurora. He had held several other jobs previously in the warehouse, the company said. The Chicago Tribune reported that Juarez lived with his wife, adult daughter and four grandchildren in a subdivision in Oswego, about 6 miles (10 kilometers) south of Aurora Relatives declined comment, saying they appreciate the support but are still dealing with the shock. Neighbor Julie Zigman called Juarez 'the patriarch of the family' and said 'everyone looked to him.' Neighbor Joven Ang said anytime he was working outside Juarez asked him if he needed help. 'That's the kind of person he was,' Ang said. JOSH PINKARD A native of Alabama, Pinkard became plant manager at Henry Pratt in the spring of 2018. He was also in the meeting with the gunman. The company said Pinkard, 37, joined the parent company 13 years ago at its Albertville, Alabama facility. The father of three earned a bachelor's degree in industrial engineering from Mississippi State University and a master's degree from University of Arkansas, according to his LinkedIn account. 'He loved God, his family and Mississippi State sports,' a cousin wrote in a text to the Chicago Tribune that he said was written on behalf of Pinkard's wife, Terra.

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Georgia Sports News

  • ATHENS — Nicolas Claxton’s All-SEC campaign continued Saturday night against No. 19 LSU, the sophomore leading Georgia in scoring and assists. The Bulldogs played the Tigers tight in a hard-fought 83-79 defeat before the sold-out Stegeman Coliseum crowd, and Claxton had everything to do with it. RELATED: Georgia battles LSU in bitter 83-79 defeat “We had no answer for Claxton,” said LSU coach Will Wade, whose team has won 14 of its past 15 games. “He played great.” Indeed, Georgia out-scored the Tigers by nine points when Claxton was on the floor. Problem was, the six minutes the 6-foot-11 forward didn’t play, LSU outscored the Bulldogs by 13. Wade credited Georgia coach Tom Crean with creating match-up problems throughout the game with personnel substitutions. LSU struggled to get a handle on how to defend Claxton. “When he’s hitting those mid-range turnarounds, it’s very tough to guard him,” Wade said. “We put Skylar (Mays) on him, one of our guards, and they posted him, and we put our big guys on him, and they took him on the perimeter and he was driving and he was spinning. “We just didn’t have very good coverage on him. They exploited the mismatch.” Claxton converted a conventional three-point play despite being triple-teamed with 5:30 left, pulling Georgia within 71-70. But Claxton couldn’t get his shot to fall with the game on the line in the final seconds. Claxton’s layup was uncharacteristically off-target after Crean called time out to set up the play with the Bulldogs down 82-79 and 29.5 seconds left. “I was supposed to drive and make the layup,” Claxton said. “So, we executed the play right, I just came up short on the layup.” Claxton is one of only four players in the Division I ranks who leads his team in all five major categories: points (12.8 per game), rebounds (9.0 per game), assists (53), blocks (64) and steals (31). Claxton, the SEC’s overall leader in rebounding and blocked shots, just wants to get back in the win column. “I would say it’s progress, us just playing our hardest for the whole 40 minutes, not coming out in the second half and being in a drought,” Claxton said. “At the end of the day, we did not want a moral victory. We wanted to come out and get the win.” Georgia dropped to 10-15 and 1-11 in SEC with the loss. The Bulldogs play host to Mississippi State at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday. Georgia basketball players LSU coach Will Wade Georgia basketball boxscore   The post WATCH: LSU won, but ‘had no answer’ for Georgia basketball star Nicolas Claxton appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Georgia gave No. 19 LSU all it wanted, but the Bulldogs couldn’t close the deal at Stegeman Coliseum on Saturday. The Tigers (21-4, 11-1 SEC) pulled out a hard-fought 83-79 win over Georgia (10-15, 1-11) in a contested affair that featured seven lead changes. The game was tied up as late as the 7:03 mark, 68-68, on a pair of Jordan Harris free throws. Nicolas Claxton led Georgia with 17 points and six rebounds, including a conventional three-point play with 5:29 left that pulled UGA within 72-71. The Bulldogs weren’t done. A  pair of Derek Ogbeide free throws with 53.6 seconds left kept Georgia within striking distance, cutting the LSU lead to 82-79. Ogbeide followed up with rim defense on Tigers’ post Naz Reid, leading to a missed shot that gave Georgia the ball with a chance to tie. Tom Crean called timeout with 29.5 seconds left and 24 showing on the shot clock to set up a play Claxton’s drive, however, came up empty and LSU closed out the game for its 14th win in its past 15 games. The Bulldogs have dropped six straight dating back to their win over Texas on Jan. 26. The loss to the Tigers was Georgia’s 10th straight against SEC competition.   LSU held a 41-37 lead at the half on the strength of 61-percent shooting through the first 20 minutes. Georgia, however, didn’t trail until the 10:15 mark when Tremont Waters drained a 3-pointer for three of his 16 first-half points. The Bulldogs led by as many as six in the opening moments, a Tyree Crump 3-pointer giving Georgia a 20-14 lead before LSU rallied. Waters’ 3-pointer capped a 7-0 run that gave the Tigers a 21-20 lead. Moments later, LSU went on a 10-0 run to go up 31-22, triggering a Tom Crean timeout at the 5:16 mark. The Bulldogs came out of that break battling, and Claxton scored six points in the final five minutes as UGA closed to 41-37 at intermission. The Bulldogs return to action at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday against Mississippi State (17-7, 5-6 in Stegeman Coliseum. The post Georgia basketball plays No. 19 LSU close, falls 83-79 appeared first on DawgNation.
  • In honor of Valentine’s Day, who are the top 5 most loved UGA football players ever by the current Bulldog fans? Please write your list at the bottom of this post. My list would start with Herschel Walker, who hasn’t played for the Bulldogs in 35 years but still remains a consensus No. 1 in my humble opinion. After that, it gets a little muddy. Here’s my list of the Top 5 most loved Bulldogs ever (subject to change): 1. Herschel Walker 2. Hines Ward 3. Todd Gurley 4. AJ Green 5. Nick Chubb Honorable mention: Aaron Murray, Buck Belue, Terrence Edwards, Ben Watson, Champ Bailey, David Pollack, Garrison Hearst, Roquan Smith, Thomas Davis, Terry Hoage, Scott Woerner, Fran Tarkenton – and I apologize because I know I’m leaving out a lot of other worthy candidates. Note: No players on the current team, such as kicker Rodrigo Blankenship (who usually gets the loudest ovation during player introductions before games) and quarterback Jake Fromm, are eligible for the list. This topic was inspire by @UGAFootballLive, who tweeted out his “top five most loved #Dawgs ever” earlier in the week. Please post your list below: The post Who are the Top 5 ‘most loved’ UGA players by the fans? appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS — Georgia football assistant coach Glenn Schumann has been promoted to co-defensive coordinator, his annual salary now worth more than half-million dollars. All before his 30th birthday. The 28-year-old Schumann has quickly established himself as one of the top recruiters in the nation. Schumann is in-part responsible for four of the five 5-stars the Bulldogs signed in the 2019 class, according to 247Sports. Dan Lanning, at 32 years old, got the nod to become the Georgia defensive coordinator with no “co-” in his title. Head coach Kirby Smart oversees the defense each week and is very much involved in all facets of game-planning. Smart’s decision to promote from within suggests Georgia isn’t looking to change up too many things after Mel Tucker’s departure from the coordinator role. Tucker vacated the UGA defensive coordinator and secondary coach position on Dec. 5 to become Colorado head coach. Smart hired Charlton Warren away from Florida to become the Bulldogs secondary coach on Jan. 19. RELATED: Kirby Smart hires Charlton Warren as Georgia football DB coach Warren is the only new face in the defensive meeting room. Warren’s experiences working for defensive gurus Bob Shoop and Bo Pelini could provide new concepts. Schumann, 28, was considered a favorite for a co-defensive coordinator role from the onset, and on Friday his salary nearly doubled. Schumann went from making $325,000 to $550,000 a year. Schumann was Smart’s first hire when the Georgia head coach took over in Athens before the 2016 season. It was Schumann’s first on-field assistant coach position as a college coach. Schumann served as Alabama’s   director of player development and player personnel the previous two seasons. Prior to that, Schumann was an undergraduate analyst (2008-Dec. 2011) and then graduate assistant (Dec. 2011-Feb. 2014). Schumann’s relative youth at the position is offset by his experience working with Smart at Alabama and Georgia, along with the fact he hails from a football family. Eric Schumann, Glen’s father, was a safety at Alabama in the 1970s and then coached 20 years of college football. His stops included Alabama-Birmingham, Tulane, SMU, East Tennessee State, Valdosta State, Livingston, New Mexico and Troy. Jack Haskin, Glenn Schumann’s grandfather, is a member of the Florida State Hall of Fame after playing on the fist-ever Seminoles’ football team. As if that weren’t enough, Schumann’s mother — Dr. Sherry Schumann — is a former collegiate coach and athletic director, according to the Georgia football media guide. Glenn Schumann graduated from McKinney Boyd High School in McKinney, Texas, lettering in football and basketball.   The post Glenn Schumann’s star on rise in Georgia football program, promoted to co-DC appeared first on DawgNation.