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    If there is a Kentucky Derby this year, Tiz the Law will have a shot to be there. And if he runs the way he did in the Florida Derby, he could very easily be a contender. Tiz the Law ran away in the stretch Saturday to easily win the Florida Derby, wrapping up a spot in the Kentucky Derby field based on the points standings that are used to determine who qualifies for the Run for the Roses. Tiz the Law's win at Gulfstream Park was worth 100 points, far more than what will be needed for a chance to run at Churchill Downs if the rescheduled Kentucky Derby goes off as planned in early September. It's a feel-good story for a sport in need of one: Tiz the Law is owned by Sackatoga Stable, the upstate New York-based group that took the sport by storm when Funny Cide won the Kentucky Derby and the Preakness in 2003. “Man, I hope they're really happy,' winning jockey Manny Franco said about the Sackatoga group led by Jack Knowlton, who was watching the race from a condo in Hallandale Beach, Florida about a mile from the track. “Their horse did a great job.' Franco said he got instructions before the race over the phone from winning trainer Barclay Tagg, but said he didn't have to do much work once the gate opened. “I give all the credit to the horse,' Franco said. Shivaree, an 80-1 long shot, was second and picked up 50 points to likely clinch a spot in the field. Fountain of Youth winner Ete Indien was third in a most unusual race at Gulfstream, where fans were not allowed and even owners were told to stay away from the track because of the coronavirus pandemic. Tiz the Law covered nine furlongs in 1:50 flat and returned $4.80, $3.60 and $2.80. Shivaree paid $42 and $13, and Ete Indien paid $3.40 to show. Ordinarily, Tiz the Law would now be immediately targeted to the Kentucky Derby because it was set to be run five weeks from now. But the pandemic has changed everything, and now it's unclear when or where any of the top Derby contenders — now, Tiz the Law foremost among them — will run again. There isn’t another major Kentucky Derby prep scheduled, for now, until May 2 when the Arkansas Derby is set to be run. Other major preps — like the Santa Anita Derby, the Wood Memorial and the Blue Grass — are all on hold. Many tracks are not running right now because of the pandemic; Santa Anita in California shut down indefinitely on Friday and Aqueduct, one of the New York Racing Association’s three tracks, canceled the rest of its winter and spring meets on Saturday. State officials announced that Aqueduct would become a temporary hospital site to help some of the many affected in the New York City area. “Aqueduct Racetrack will serve as a safe haven for those recovering from this virus,” NYRA CEO and President Dave O'Rourke said. “We recognize that we all must work together as a community to meet this challenge and emerge stronger for it.” Aqueduct’s winter meet was to end Sunday and its spring meet was to run from April 2-19. NYRA’s next meet is the 51-day schedule at Belmont Park, which is still scheduled to open on April 24. Gulfstream’s championship meet is scheduled to end Sunday. Its spring-summer meet is scheduled to begin Friday with racing typically four days a week through the end of September. Florida eclipsed the 4,000-case mark Saturday — with roughly half of those coming from in Miami-Dade and Broward counties, meaning Gulfstream Park is squarely within the state’s pandemic hotspot. Gulfstream is in Hallandale Beach, in Broward County, just over the border from Miami-Dade to the south. Gulfstream announced on March 12 that it would continue with live racing, but without fans present. It tightened protocols at least twice since, first by closing its on-site casino on March 16 and then going to a “no guests, no exceptions” policy on March 19 that barred media and even owners from going to see races. Remaining open has even drawn the ire of some local politicians who insisted the track should not be allowed to run with the area basically on lockdown. But bettors have continued pumping money in via online and simulcast opportunities. “I think it’s critical to the economy of racing that, if we can, we continue racing,” trainer Todd Pletcher said, adding that his stance is predicated on safety being assured for everyone involved. The lack of on-track handle and casino revenue forced Gulfstream to trim the Florida Derby purse from $1 million to $750,000. The track also slightly dropped the purse for several other stakes races Saturday.
  • ATHENS Georgia quarterback D'Wan Mathis was back in his home state of Michigan over spring break when the coronavirus pandemic began to take effect. Some of the Bulldogs' players would end up staying home when UGA suspended and then canceled face-to-face spring semester classes. But not Mathis. 'D'Wan came back on spring break and told me he loves where he is from, but that he needed to go back to Georgia,' Terence Mathis told DawgNation on Friday. 'He said, Daddy, I love you, but I'm leaving.' 'For us, we're just happy he was granted the exemption to stay near campus where they have the best doctors in the world keeping up with him.' The former Ohio State quarterback commit from metro Detroit has had a challenging rehabilitation period after an emergency brain surgery procedure last May 23 put him in the ICU unit at Piedmont Athens Regional Medical Center. 'I want the public to know this, please write this: Georgia could have given up on my son,' Terence Mathis said. 'But instead, Kirby and his staff have treated D'Wan as though he was their own son. They've used every possible resource to stay behind him and keep him engaged with the team after saving his life.' RELATED: Georgia saved my son's life, medical director Ron Courson praised Indeed, Coach Kirby Smart made it clear last May that Georgia would not rush Mathis' comeback, and they planned for a complete recovery. 'We are expecting a full recovery, and the timeline is the least of our concerns,' Smart said at SEC spring meetings. Mathis' comeback has come in stages. He was cleared to run and lift last July. By the start of the 2019 season, he was participating in limited drill work. By last November, Mathis running the scout team offense and playing with such passion that coaches and doctors had to reel him in and remind him to use some restraint. Mathis was cleared to go through spring football drills, though it's important to note he's not yet been cleared for game action. There's an MRI test scheduled for May that could provided the all-important clearance for total contact (UGA doesn't tackle its quarterbacks in spring drills). More good news came on Friday, when the SEC added some provisions for coaches to instruct players. Mathis, along with fellow Georgia football quarterbacks Jamie Newman, Caron Beck and Stetson Bennett, has the benefit of chalk talks starting at 1 p.m. next Monday. RELATED: SEC moves toward resuming football preparations Terence Mathis maintains the football will take care of itself. He said the most important thing to the Mathis family is how D'Wan has been accepted into the Georgia football community. 'I'm indebted to Georgia, they have extended this incredible opportunity to D'Wan,' Terence Mathis said. 'Especially during these tough times, and you know it's bad up here in Michigan. 'It means everything to us as a family for him to now have the opportunity to be involved with the football planning while still pursuing academics. 'Coach (Todd) Monken has reached out to me and let me know that D'Wan is having positive progress.' Mathis' upside was obvious to all who watched last year's G-Day Game. The 6-foot-6, 205-pounder was 15-of-28 passing for 113 yards and provided one of the biggest highlights of the Georgia football spring game. Mathis, who ran a 10.8-second time in the 100 meters in high school, showed his speed when he caught a double-reverse pass from Matt Landers for a 39-yard touchdown. TRICK PLAY ALERT #GDay #GoDawgs pic.twitter.com/3Qc6Opb85L Georgia Football (@GeorgiaFootball) April 21, 2019 'D'Wan, he's explosive,' Jake Fromm said of his former understudy. 'I think he converted three or four first downs in a row with his legs. 'The guy can run the ball, he can throw it 70 yards, he's going to be a great player.' The strong performances in spring drills kept Mathis going during the dog days of last summer and into the season. But there were also frustrating times when D'Wan Maths didn't know what to do without football, unable to travel to away games. That's when Georgia came up biggest, according to his father. 'As frustrated as he got, the more they wrapped their arms around him,' Terence Mathis said. 'Those coaches could have said they were too busy trying to win the SEC East again and play for another league title. But they didn't say that. 'They believed in D'Wan, and they have stayed behind him, and the DawgNation fans have stayed behind him, too.' There is no timetable for college football to return at the time of this publication (March 28). The coronavirus has put all group activities around the world on hold. But Terence Mathis said his son will remain in Athens. 'That's what he considers his home now,' he said, 'and it's where we believe he belongs.' DawgNation D'Wan Mathis stories Mind Game: D'Wan Mathis ready to compete for starting job Mathis tipped by social media Ohio State misled him on Justin Fields D'Wan Mathis recovering after emergency brain cyst surgery Jake Fromm shares observations of D'Wan Mathis The post Georgia quarterback D'Wan Mathis continuing comeback home' in Athens, granted exemption appeared first on DawgNation.
  • The walk to the starting grid for Tony Kanaan began in his Indianapolis kitchen, through the foyer, past the trophy case, up the stairs, down the hall, through the master bedroom, master bathroom and finally into the closet. That’s where the former Indianapolis 500 winner tucked away Saturday to participate in a full day of iRacing on a simulator in the one place his wife will tolerate the rig. Kanaan participated in two virtual races, a legends event won by three-time Indianapolis 500 winner Dario Franchitti. Then he joined the first of a six-week series that launched Saturday to give IndyCar fans content during the coronavirus pandemic. IndyCar followed the lead of NASCAR and other racing series in throwing together something - anything - to fill the void created when COVID-19 brought sports to a halt. IndyCar suspended the start of its season 48 hours before the March 15 opener in St. Petersburg, Florida, and on Thursday the Indianapolis 500 was postponed until August. NASCAR had a successful launch of its iRacing series last Sunday and it was the most-watched televised esports event ever with more than 900,000 viewers. IndyCar couldn’t get a television deal so its inaugural race was streamed online from virtual Watkins Glen International Speedway, the venue decided by fan vote. YouTube streams from IndyCar and iRacing combined for about 45,000 viewers to watch a virtual race called by NBC Sports' regular booth of Leigh Diffey, Townsend Bell and Paul Tracy. The invocation was done remotely, as was the National Anthem, sung by Chicago Blackhawks regular Jim Cornelison. The field included NASCAR’s seven-time champion Jimmie Johnson, who made his iRacing debut last weekend in a stock car using SIM settings more suited for IndyCar or sports car. Johnson has been using his rig to prepare for potential races in other series upon his retirement from full-time racing at the end of the season. He was scheduled to test an IndyCar next month in Alabama but that’s been canceled amid the pandemic. He wore a T-Shirt honoring late open-wheel driver Greg Moore for his virtual IndyCar debut, which he streamed live on his social media channels. Most drivers tried to give viewers an inside look of their experience, including James Hinchcliffe, the popular Canadian who played the part wearing a stereotypical flannel shirt and Team Canada red hat with ear flaps. But a technical glitch stopped his his SIM before the green flag and Hinchcliffe didn’t get to race, er, play, after all. Hinchcliffe had to go to an Indianapolis-area friends’ house to participate in the race because he doesn’t own a simulator, same with Robert Wickens, who hasn’t raced since his spinal cord injury in a 2018 crash but hoped to be in the iRacing event. Wickens struggled to find a simulator with a steering wheel equipped with hand controls so he could bypass pedals. The IndyCar community stepped in and Wickens was able to get a simulator from Cary and Todd Bettenhausen, the twin sons of former IndyCar racer Gary Bettenhausen. A steering wheel designed by IndyCar steward Max Papis’ innovation company was shipped from North Carolina, but alas, did not arrive in Indianapolis in time for Wickens to participate. Much like NASCAR’s first event last week, the iRace had a wide range of talents because the younger drivers use iRacing as a training tool, while veterans are new to the gaming rage. Participating in the series requires having the technology – which can be difficult to not only secure in a hurry, but also have installed in a drivers’ home during a lockdown – and the desire to be a good sport for fans starving for entertainment. Teams also viewed it as an opportunity to showcase their sponsors at a time there’s almost no way for promotion or activation. It was important to many organizations to have their car and sponsor represented, which got Scott Speed a slot in Marco Andretti’s place when Andretti declined to participate. Australian V8 SuperCars champion Scott McLaughlin entered the virtual event as one of four Team Penske drivers, but it is the closest he’ll get to a race now that his IndyCar debut has been put on hold. He was scheduled to run May 9 on the road course at Indianapolis Motor Speedway but those plans were scrapped when the race was moved to July 4. The race results were not surprising as the top iRacers led the way. Sage Karam, who turned 25 in March, won the race with no prior experience at Watkins Glen. Felix Rosenqvist, last year's IndyCar top rookie, was second. The Penske crew of Will Power and McLaughlin were third and fourth, followed by Indy Lights champion Oliver Askew, who is 23.
  • Roger Penske, at 83 and considered high risk for the coronavirus as a 2017 kidney transplant recipient, still makes the daily three-minute commute to his Bloomfield Hills, Michigan, office. He works 12 or more hours a day from his conference room at Penske Corp., which has a skeleton crew practicing social distancing. Penske has 60,000 employees across the world in an organization in constant flux because of the COVID-19 crisis. That would be enough for the leader of any corporation, but this pandemic is marring his debut as owner of Indianapolis Motor Speedway and the IndyCar Series. His cloak-and-dagger purchase was done in six weeks last year, the sale completed in January, and the most important thing to Penske since taking over was gearing up for his first chance to host “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” The Indianapolis 500 won’t be run on Memorial Day weekend for the first time since 1946 after Penske on Thursday postponed one of America’s crown jewel sporting events until Aug. 23. “I took the road that gave us the longest distance, five months,' he said. 'If this thing isn’t over in five months, we’ve got bigger problems.” It's a rotten way to usher in a new era at both Indianapolis Motor Speedway and IndyCar, the little series that can and wants to but just can’t reach the next level. But now it has Penske, the American industrialist who turned his racing hobby into a mighty empire. He agreed last fall to become just the fourth owner of national landmark Indianapolis Motor Speedway in a deal with the Hulman-George family, which had controlled American open-wheel racing since Tony Hulman bought the dilapidated speedway on the corner of 16th Street and Georgetown Avenue in 1945 at the end of World War II. Indy was Penske’s personal playground long before Tony George offered him a chance to bid on property everyone believed impossible to pry from the Hulman-George group. His Team Penske drivers won the Indy 500 a record 18 times, and the speedway suites and hospitality areas for decades have been the backdrop for Penske to celebrate his partners and employees. The Captain was the perfect man to give the speedway a good cleaning and take the Indy 500 to even greater prestige in the sporting landscape. And the IndyCar Series got the right guy to help its push for relevance. Then came the pandemic, which first put the start of the season on hold and now has delayed the iconic 500. “It’s a shame Roger has to go through this in his first year of owning Indianapolis Motor Speedway,” said four-time 500 winner A.J. Foyt, also a team owner, “but you couldn’t have a better man in charge.' In a wide-ranging interview with The Associated Press, Penske insisted his commitment remains steadfast to the speedway and the IndyCar Series as the world waits for the pandemic to end. “This was a commitment we made not for one year; it’s a lifelong commitment for our family and the company and all of our people,” Penske said. “The disappointment certainly is there. But you know, I’ve looked at it as an opportunity to show people that we’re still committed to the sport. We want to rally the team, let them know we are supporting them.” Penske had his heart set on opening the speedway gates in May to a glistening property he intends to make as pristine and revered as Augusta National. He’s put so much personal effort into pumping up the Indy 500 — from dumping an additional $2 million into the purse to push it to a record $15 million to upgrading the decrepit bathrooms and adding hand dryers — that giving up Memorial Day weekend and Indianapolis' celebration of the national holiday was not easy. So why not wait a little longer and see if the country opens up, just in case the race that draws crowds in excess of 300,000 could happen? “You have to make a decision, you just have to, with the number of people involved,” Penske said. “If we wait all the way until May to make these decisions, and you make a last-minute decision, now you don’t have a television partner because you don’t know what the Olympics are doing. Then the Olympics opened up, so I said, ‘Look, I want those dates.'” Among other issues Penske addressed: — Helping teams Penske noted that North Carolina, where probably 99% of NASCAR teams are located, as is his entire Team Penske operation, is on lockdown, so there aren’t any cars to be built. He’s put a team of Penske officials in charge of exploring laws in each state to build a clearinghouse so teams from any series can determine what, if anything, they are eligible for under the $2 trillion coronavirus response bill. He also said the full-time IndyCar teams will be paid as scheduled from the series' bonus programs. “We’ve committed the first three commitments through their leaders circle to pay them. We’re doing everything we can to help them,' Penske said. — Teaming with NASCAR IndyCar had hoped to open its season with the road course race at Indianapolis on May 9, but that event has been moved to July 4, mere hours after NASCAR’s debut with the Xfinity Series on the same circuit. It will be an unprecedented doubleheader if it goes off as scheduled, and the idea of the two series merging on one weekend seemed a pipe dream until Penske’s announcement. Even though NASCAR is expected to revamp its schedule in 2021, Penske Entertainment CEO Mark Miles, in that role for the Hulman-George family, seemed only lukewarm to sharing a weekend with stock cars. Now it’s on the schedule to happen with Penske dealing directly with NASCAR President Steve Phelps and executive Steve O’Donnell. It saved the road course race from becoming a mundane IndyCar event and instead created what could be a first of its kind as the Cup Series is scheduled to run the oval the next day. “Everybody had their fingerprints on it one time or another,” Penske said. “Ben Kennedy came and looked at the track himself to get a look at the track before we could get Xfinity on it. Then with the coronavirus, when it looked like (May 9) was going to be in trouble, we talked about was there an ability for us to run the IndyCar race with The Brickyard? And that was the discussion with Steve Phelps and then the work with O’Donnell and General Motors. We hope we can do something really special.” One loss for IndyCar’s Grand Prix is that Australian V8 SuperCars champion Scott McLaughlin will no longer make his IndyCar debut in that event, Penske said, because of the hectic schedule and lack of practice time. — Rest of the IndyCar schedule: For now, IndyCar is scheduled to start the season with a doubleheader at Belle Isle in Detroit, the one race Penske promotes, at the end of May. It can be adjusted if needed, Penske said, because Belle Isle could run later in the year. He also said he’s hopeful a return can be worked out with St. Petersburg, Florida, which had the street course built to host the March 15 season opener until the race was called off 48 hours before green flag. “At the end of October, there’s open dates there,” Penske said. “And, you know, we’ll see how we come out at the end of the other end. But I think the one thing is the most important race that we have has at least 150 days and, you know, running that is the priority.” — His mood: Penske continues to work alongside “a very small group” accessing his conference room, and “we’re practicing social distance and we’re cleaning every time anybody comes in or out.” His transportation operations have been suspended in Germany, Italy, Spain and the U.K., and his race teams can’t currently work. “We have such a commitment to 60,000 people around the world,” he said. Penske said he’ll tune in to iRacing for the first time on Saturday when IndyCar drivers and NASCAR’s seven-time champion Jimmie Johnson will stage a virtual race to give fans content. He said he’s had no exposure to esports, noting his grandchildren play hockey and lacrosse. As to the notion that Penske will ensure that IndyCar and the Indy 500 weather the coronavirus, he’s heard the praise from fellow team owners on his conference calls and appreciates their faith. “It was a huge relief to get something decided with the 500, not only for me, but the community and the industry. It needed to be locked down,” Penske said. “Within this small group, the team owners, I’ve built the credibility with them both on and off the track. And that means more to me than the next ticket. I’ve got to use every tool I have, all the people we have contacts with, in order to help our teams make the series the best we can. It’s going to be great once we get on the track.”
  • The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world: ___ Canadian hockey goalie equipment manufacturer Brian's Custom Sports has begun producing medical supplies for hospitals in and around southwestern Ontario. The company in Kingsville was originally approached by public health officials about its surplus of double-sided tape and foam. But when the Ontario government closed nonessential businesses to help stop the spread of COVID-19, the company was asked to change its production. Now its 15-person sewing team is producing medical gowns for front-line medical workers for Windsor-Essex EMS. ___ Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence and his girlfriend have restarted their efforts to raise money for those affected by the new coronavirus. They announced their decision Saturday on social media. The two had set up a GoFundMe page earlier this week until told by Clemson compliance officials the site violated NCAA rules against using an athlete's name, image and likeness for crowd funding. But the NCAA said Tuesday that Lawrence and other athletes could use such sites to raise money in this case. Lawrence's girlfriend, Marissa Mowry, is a soccer player at Anderson University, about 15 miles from Clemson's campus. They created the “Trevor Lawrence and Marissa Mowry COVID-19 Relief Fund” designed to provide direct assistance to families affected by the pandemic. ___ The Colorado Avalanche say a second player has tested positive for the new coronavirus. The team said it was informed Friday night and the player is in self-isolation. In their statement Saturday, the Avalanche say those who came in close contact with the player have been informed and remain isolated. The team says no other Avalanche player or staff member has shown symptoms at this time. The unidentified player has become the fourth known NHL player to test positive for the virus. The other two are with Ottawa. ___ Two-time Grand Slam champion Naomi Osaka says she is disappointed that the Olympics in her native Japan were postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic, but she supports the decision to delay the Summer Games to 2021. In a posting Saturday on social media, she said she's 'been thinking about how to articulate my thoughts on this for a couple of days now.' The decision to push back the games from July and August 2020 until sometime next year was announced Tuesday. Osaka wrote: 'Sport will eventually unite us again and be there for us always, but that time is not now.' She also addressed 'the people of Japan,' where she was born, saying, 'stay strong, hang in there and let's show the world our beautiful country when the time is right.' The 22-year-old Osaka figures to be one of the most-watched stars in Tokyo, given that she represents the host country and is a medal contender in tennis. She won the 2018 U.S. Open and 2019 Australian Open and became the first player from Asia to reach No. 1 in the singles rankings. ___ An A-League soccer player has become the first Australian professional footballer to test positive for the new coronavirus. The unnamed player, who plays for the Newcastle Jets in New South Wales state, was tested Friday as a precaution before an international flight. He played in recent A-League matches against Brisbane and Melbourne City. The player is now in quarantine and the A-League is suspended at least until April 22. Jets chief executive Lawrie McKinna said the player is asymptomatic and in good health. McKinna said the rest of the squad does not “need to get into isolation” but are being monitored. ___ Soccer players and celebrities will take part in a global music festival on Saturday organized by the Spanish league in order to raise funds for the fight against the coronavirus. Barcelona’s Gerard Piqué, Real Madrid’s Sergio Ramos and Sevilla’s Jesús Navas will be among the players involved in the charity event organized to raise money “for the purchase of medical supplies in the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic and to also support fans confined to their homes during the current period of quarantine,” the league said. Celebrities in the festival will include singers Aitana, Alejandro Sanz, Beret and Luis Fonsi, actress Danna Paola, music bands Morat and Taburete, and tennis star Rafael Nadal. The soccer players and celebrities will all participate from their homes. The concert is to be shown live through the league's international broadcasters and streamed via YouTube and Facebook. The “music extravaganza” will be broadcast in more than 180 countries simultaneously, starting at 1700 GMT (1 p.m. EST). ___ Barcelona has delivered 30,000 masks to the Catalonia government to help fight the coronavirus pandemic. The masks were made in China and donated by insurance company Taiping, a regional partner of the club. Barcelona said the “daily use” masks will be distributed to nursing homes. The club added it is working through its foundation “to do as much as possible to help with this crisis, both locally and internationally.” Spain, where stay-at-home restrictions have been in place for nearly two weeks, reported 832 more deaths on Saturday, its highest daily count yet, bringing its total to 5,690. An additional 8,000 confirmed infections pushed that count above 72,000. ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports
  • Austin Carr played for Notre Dame in an era when prolific scorers dominated college basketball. LSU's Pete Maravich was scoring 40 a night and still No. 1 on the points list. Niagara's Calvin Murphy, Purdue's Rick Mount and St. Bonaventure's Bob Lanier, along with Carr, were others putting up eye-popping numbers. It wasn't until Carr scored a still-standing NCAA Tournament-record 61 points against Ohio in the first round in 1970 that, in his mind, he started to separate himself. “At the time it gave me a different status in the basketball world,” he told The Associated Press this week. “It gave me an opportunity to be put on the radar, to be in the top three or four players in the draft. A whole lot of things happened because of that.' Carr averaged 34.6 points over 74 college games, a figure that still ranks No. 2 behind Maravich's 44.4. In the 1971 NBA draft, Carr was taken No. 1 overall by the Cleveland Cavaliers. Carr played nine of his 11 pro seasons with the Cavs and averaged better than 15 points a game, a figure that would have been higher had it not been for injuries. Now 72, he's the team's television analyst and director of community and business development. Carr said he didn't expect his single-game tournament scoring record to last so long. At the same time, he laments the magnitude of the accomplishment has faded over 50 years, perhaps because he never made it past a regional semifinal when he played for the Irish. “It's there but it doesn't really ring a lot of bells until this time of year because people don't talk about it,' he said. “Recently, I'm starting to hear more about it as a record that might not be broken. So that's starting to travel around. But the one thing about this generation, we don't really worry too much about the past. They're more about the future. I've just resigned myself to that.” Notre Dame, like most teams back then, relied heavily on one or two players to carry the scoring load. Carr was comfortable shooting from anywhere on the floor, and point guard Jack Meehan was adept at feeding him the ball. Carr's 61-point game really wasn't out of character. He averaged 41.3 points over seven NCAA games from 1968-71, including games of 52, 52, 47 and 45 points. Film of the game against Ohio showed nine of his baskets came from behind what would have been today's 3-point arc, meaning he would have scored 70 in this era. The game in Dayton, Ohio, didn't begin well for Carr. Ohio's John Canine, the man he was assigned to guard, made his first six shots. Assistant coach Gene Sullivan approached Carr on the bench and said, “Are you going to play defense tonight or let this guy kill you?' That moment changed the game. Canine cooled off and Carr went on a tear. The junior shooting guard was 25 of 44 from the field and 11 of 14 from the line, and the Irish won 112-82. During Carr's career, Notre Dame made three straight NCAA Tournament appearances for the first time in school history. “It helped put a football school on the basketball map, and that's what I really enjoyed about that whole time at Notre Dame,” Carr said. “To give it some type of a basketball reputation, I was really proud of that.” DANNY MANNING, KANSAS (1988) Manning orchestrated one of the biggest championship game upsets with his 31 points, 18 rebounds and five steals in an 83-79 win over Oklahoma. This was not a vintage Jayhawks team. It was a No. 6 seed and, with the exception of Manning, was devoid of name players. The Big Eight-champion Sooners averaged 103 points a game, had already beaten Kansas twice and were eight-point favorites. The Jayhawks weren't intimidated. “Every time we stepped on the court we felt like we were going to win,” Manning, now the Wake Forest coach, said this week. “It didn't matter who we were playing. That was just our mindset.” After playing at OU's up-tempo pace into the second half, coach Larry Brown had his Jayhawks slow things down for the last 12 minutes. OU got out of sorts, and Manning made four free throws in the last 14 seconds to secure the win. The team known as “Danny and the Miracles” remains one of the great underdog stories in tournament history, though Manning has never been comfortable with the nickname. “Not at all,' he said. 'Basketball is a team sport. My teammates did so many things to help me on the court, to make the game easier for me — whether it was getting me open, getting the ball to me in the right spots, defensively being ready to rotate over and help. It was definitely a team victory without question.” BILL RUSSELL, SAN FRANCISCO (1956) Russell turned in one of the most dominant performances in college basketball history in the championship game against Iowa. Officially, he had 26 points and a still-Final Four-record 27 rebounds in the 83-71 win. Media reports also credited him with between 12 and 20 blocks. The 83-71 victory gave the Dons their second straight national title and extended their winning streak to 55 games. OSCAR ROBERTSON, CINCINNATI (1958-60) The “Big O” was the king of the triple-double, and you need to look no further than the NCAA Tournament record book for proof. The triple-double was an “unofficial” statistic until the 1980s, but many box scores before that included categories such as assists, blocks and steals. Four of the top five tournament triple-doubles pre-1986 belong to Robertson, none more impressive than his 39 points, 17 rebounds and 10 assists against Louisville in the 1959 third-place game. The year before he scored 56 points against Arkansas. His 32.4-point average over 10 tournament games ranks third all-time. BILL WALTON, UCLA (1973) The Bruins won a seventh straight national title behind Walton's 44 points against Memphis State — still the most in a championship game. Walton made 21 of 22 shots from the field, and that didn't include four baskets that didn't count because of the era's no-dunking rule. The 87-66 victory was UCLA's 75th win in a row. CHRISTIAN LAETTNER, DUKE (1992) No NCAA Tournament is complete without revisiting Christian Laettner catching that long inbounds pass, turning, dribbling once and swishing his shot from just behind the free-throw line to beat Kentucky in overtime and send Duke to the Final Four. It was a fitting end to a 31-point performance in which Laettner made all 10 of his shots from the field and all 10 of his free throws. He was relatively quiet in the national semifinal against Indiana before scoring a team-high 19 in a 71-51 win over Michigan in the title game. ___ More AP college basketball: https://apnews.com/MarchMadness and https://apnews.com/Collegebasketball and http://www.twitter.com/AP_Top25
  • We've now reached the Final Four. Not of the NCAA Tournament but of the top Georgia football moments that have occurred under Kirby Smart. We now have the representatives for each season 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 that Smart has guided the Georgia program. The 2016 winner was the top seed, being Nick Chubb's return against North Carolina. The game also gave Smart his first career win, while Chubb ran for over 200 yards in his first game back. The 2017 pick is the runaway favorite to win, as that year is being repped by Sony Michel's game-ending touchdown run against Oklahoma. It's hard to imagine this moment somehow not winning the whole bracket, given how dominant that moment is been in voting up to this point. The 2018 selection was D'Andre Swift's touchdown run against Auburn, which capped Swift's best-career game in a Georgia uniform. And the representative for the past season was Georgia's 23-17 win over Notre Dame. The big highlight from that game was the light show that took place between the third and fourth quarters, though Lawrence Cager's touchdown catch. The Swift run will take on the 2019 Notre Dame game, while Chubb's return has the unfortunate matchup against Michel's final Rose Bowl touchdown. You can vote on the results below, as well as see the full brackets as to how we got to this point. Full Bracket 2016 vs. 2017 region No. 1 Sony Michel's walk-off against Oklahoma vs.No. 1 Nick Chubb's return Breakdown:Michel dominated again, winning 92-8 over the 2017 Notre Dame take over. Michel's game-winning touchdown run is the heavy favorite to win the entire bracket. Think back to how great it felt in that moment for the Bulldogs to punch their ticket to Atlanta. Chubb's return also advanced to this point with relative ease, beating Jacob Eason's winner against Mizzou by a 72-28 margin. This was Chubb's first game back after a horrific knee injury against Tennessee in his sophomore season. He came out and ran for 222 yards, the second-most in his illustrious Georgia career. The result also gave Georgia a win over North Carolina in Smart's first-ever game as Georgia's head coach. In the first matchup, 2017's top moment against 2016's top moment DawgNation (@DawgNation) March 28, 2020 2018 vs. 2019 region No. 2 D'Andre Swift's touchdown run against Auburn vs.No. 1 The Notre Dame lights show The 77-yard touchdown run by Swift capped not only his best career game but also a three-game stretch that saw the Bulldogs beat three straight-ranked opponents in Florida, Kentucky and Auburn. It got the final four by beating Kirby Smart's post-Florida celebration. Auburn has one of the best run defenses in the country. @DAndreSwift has 186 yards against it, including this 77 yard touchdown. pic.twitter.com/XoxKAB0fyq Dayne Young (@dayneyoung) November 11, 2018 The Notre Dame win is on the shortlist of best home games of the past decade. It advanced with a 58-42 margin over HBTFD. And in the other matchup, 2018 against 2019 DawgNation (@DawgNation) March 28, 2020 More Georgia football stories from around DawgNation Georgia football podcast: CBS writer says UGA among teams most hurt by missing spring practice SEC steps toward resuming football preparations, approves online chalk talks Jonathan Jefferson: 5 things to know about this week's 2021 Georgia commit Opinion: Kirk Herbstreit's reckless speculation does college football a disservice WATCH: If you don't like Todd Gurley on the Atlanta Falcons, you're anti-fun ESPN NFL draft analyst Mel Kiper Jr. breaks down D'Andre Swift draft stock Georgia football podcast: 5 things to know about UGA's chances of making Playoff Tony Grimes: Nation's No. 1 CB was set to see UGA amid a flurry of spring visits The post Bracket season: Discussing the top moment of each Georgia football season under Kirby Smart appeared first on DawgNation.
  • A panel of Associated Press sports writers voted in March 2020 on the top 10 men's basketball games in the history of the NCAA Tournament. They are being republished because the sport has been shut down because of the coronavirus pandemic. The following game was voted No. 4 and the following story was sent April 1, 1985. ___ Underdog Villanova, shooting 79 percent from the field, denied Patrick Ewing and top-ranked Georgetown a second straight NCAA basketball title Monday night with a 66-64 victory. Georgetown had won 17 straight games and completed the season with a 35-3 record and a 121-23 record in the four-year career of the 7-foot Ewing, a four-time All-American. Villanova, 25-10, was beaten twice by the Hoyas during the regular Big East season, 52-50 in overtime and 57-50, and Georgetown entered the game a nine-point favorite. “No one thought we could do it, but I did,” Villanova coach Rollie Massimino shouted afterward. And the rotund coach and his unranked crew from the Philadelphia suburbs had plenty of heroes to go around. Dawyne McClain hit two free throws and Harold Pressley one of two to provide the margin of victory, with Georgetown's Michael Jackson completing the scoring with a field goal with four seconds remaining. McClain, hitting five of seven field goals. paced Villanova with 17 points and 6-foot-9 Ed Pinckney, who battled Ewing in the pivot all night, scored 16. The Wildcats also hit 22 of 27 free throws and matched the Hoyas on the boards with 17 rebounds. And they limited Ewing, the Hoyas' All-American center, to 14 points. Georgetown was trying to become only the seventh team and the first since UCLA in 1973 to repeat as NCAA champions. They were being rated among the greatest teams of all time, after breezing through the last part of their schedule and looking stronger with each game. But Villanova, which finished in a third-place tie in the Big East Conference with Syracuse, began a six-game winning streak in the tournament, knocking off other ranked teams such as No. 2 Michigan and No. 5 Memphis State in Saturday's semifinal. Their upset victory was akin to that of North Carolina State, which won the NCAA title two years ago as an overwhelming underdog. But that N.C. State team finished with one more victory against its 10 losses, and the 16th ranking in the final pre-tournament poll. All Villanova had to show was hope as it entered its sixth consecutive NCAA tournament, a competition they had never won. The Wildcats pulled ahead 29-28 at halftime and after Ewing hit an opening jumper in the second half, they went up 36-30 with Harold Jensen's basket, a three-point play by Pinckney and a jumper by Gary McLain. McClain's three-point play kept them up 41-36, but Georgetown came back and went ahead on David Wingate's jumper 42-41 with 9:49 remaining. The lead changed hands five times, the last on a jumper by Pinckney, who was named the tournament's Most Valuable Player. McLain hit two free throws for a 49-46 lead. Again the Wildcats went ahead by five on a Pinckney jumper but Georgetown came back with six straight points. Wingate's drive put the Hoyas ahead 54-53. Pinckney then lost the ball trying to drive against Ewing and the Hoyas went into a spread offense. But Horace Broadnax, attempting to pass to Bill Martin, threw the ball off a Villanova player and it bounced off Broadnax's feet. Villanova then hit six straight points, with Jensen hitting a jumper, Pinckney two free throws and Jensen two more free throws for a 59-54 advantage with 1:24 remaining. Broadnax then made a basket but Jensen, a reserve sophomore guard who played most of the game, connected for two more free throws. McClain then missed a free throw, snapping his string of 20 consecutive foul shot tosses in the tournament, and Jensen also missed the front end of a one-and-one. Ewing's jam brought Georgetown within 61-58 with 41 seconds left but McClain then came through with two more free throws. A Wingate field goal pulled the Hoyas within three but McClain then hit another one-and-one with 18 seconds left for a 65-60 edge. Michael Jackson scored for Georgetown before Pressley went to the line for two free throws and made only one. Ewing , the AP Player of the Year, hit seven of 13 shots from the field but grabbed only five rebounds. Wingate had 16 points, hitting eight of 14 from the field. Bill Martin and Reggie Williams also hit 10 points apiece for the Hoyas. All of Williams' points came in the first half. The Hoyas shot 52 percent and went to the free throw line only eight times, connecting on six of them. Villanova, meanwhile, shot an incredible 90 percent from the field in the second half. Villanova's hot shooting overcame 17 turnovers forced by the relentless Georgetown defense, which pressed and trapped virtually all the way. Pinckney, a 6-foot-9 1/2 senior, hot on five of seven from the field. ___ More AP March Madness coverage: https://apnews.com/MarchMadness
  • DawgNation has four staffers who cover Georgia football from every angle: Beat, live streams, photos, podcasts, recruiting, etc. The 'Cover 4' concept is: 1) Present a topic; 2) Offer a reasoned response; 3) Share a brisk statement on that opinion. 4) Pepper the page with photos for the big picture. For this edition, we discuss what Georgia fans would have been talking about now had COVID-19 not put our way of life on hold. DawgNation continues with the 'Cover 4' concept. The focus is always a timely look with each of our guys manning the secondary on a pertinent topic. We're looking at our now useless Georgia spring practice schedule from earlier this year. It makes us wince. Poof. All of that is gone. But football will return. Someday. Hopefully soon. That schedule says the 2020 Bulldogs would have been six practices deep into their spring drills after today. What would have DawgNation been talking about right now? We closed our eyes and imagined what that would have looked like. It resulted in another 'Cover 4' discussion of four different aspects of the team. It was fun to do amidst a time of great renewal for the Georgia program. Well, except for a salty defense which should be the best of the Kirby Smart era in Athens. The quick in-and-out game remains. The Cover 4 is designed to come out as quick as everyone is to try to maintain their social distancing these days. What would have been the big Georgia football spring practice storyline right now? Brandon Adams: Jamie Newman The 'why' from 'DawgNation Daily' here: 'The quarterback is almost always the biggest story, and this certainly would've been the case with Newman. The absence of spring practice only increases our anticipation to see Newman's debut this fall .' Mike Griffith: The offensive line The 'why' from 'On the Beat' here: 'This is the area Kirby Smart is most concerned about, and he'll say it. There will be discussion about different players lining up in different places, and injury updates . ' Connor Riley: Todd, Todd, Todd Monken The 'why' from 'Good Day UGA' here: ' Between Smart and some offensive players, we'd have gotten to hear more about working with the new offensive coordinator and what he brings to the table, as well as the working dynamic with Smart.' Jeff Sentell: The need for more playmakers at receiver. Again. The Intel here: 'Kirby Smart made it clear last spring he didn't have enough playmakers at receiver. He wanted to see what Dominick Blaylock, Lawrence Cager and George Pickens could add to the unit. It would have been the same chorus this year. The only differences between the receivers practicing last spring would have been the subtraction of veterans J.J Holloman and Tyler Simmons and the addition of Pickens and Justin Robinson. The Bulldogs will again await the arrival of Jermaine Burton, Marcus Rosemy, Ladd McConkey and Arian Smith with great anticipation. When they hit the field, that's when we will get a glimpse of where Monken's new offense can take Georgia this fall.' The post Georgia football: What would have been the talk of spring practices by now? appeared first on DawgNation.
  • The Latest on the effects of the coronavirus outbreak on sports around the world: ___ Clemson quarterback Trevor Lawrence and his girlfriend have restarted their efforts to raise money for those affected by the new coronavirus. They announced their decision Saturday on social media. The two had set up a GoFundMe page earlier this week until told by Clemson compliance officials the site violated NCAA rules against using an athlete's name, image and likeness for crowd funding. But the NCAA said Tuesday that Lawrence and other athletes could use such sites to raise money in this case. Lawrence's girlfriend, Marissa Mowry, is a soccer player at Anderson University, about 15 miles from Clemson's campus. They created the “Trevor Lawrence and Marissa Mowry COVID-19 Relief Fund” designed to provide direct assistance to families affected by the pandemic. ___ The Colorado Avalanche say a second player has tested positive for the new coronavirus. The team said it was informed Friday night and the player is in self-isolation. In their statement Saturday, the Avalanche say those who came in close contact with the player have been informed and remain isolated. The team says no other Avalanche player or staff member has shown symptoms at this time. The unidentified player has become the fourth known NHL player to test positive for the virus. The other two are with Ottawa. ___ Two-time Grand Slam champion Naomi Osaka says she is disappointed that the Olympics in her native Japan were postponed because of the coronavirus pandemic, but she supports the decision to delay the Summer Games to 2021. In a posting Saturday on social media, she said she's 'been thinking about how to articulate my thoughts on this for a couple of days now.' The decision to push back the games from July and August 2020 until sometime next year was announced Tuesday. Osaka wrote: 'Sport will eventually unite us again and be there for us always, but that time is not now.' She also addressed 'the people of Japan,' where she was born, saying, 'stay strong, hang in there and let's show the world our beautiful country when the time is right.' The 22-year-old Osaka figures to be one of the most-watched stars in Tokyo, given that she represents the host country and is a medal contender in tennis. She won the 2018 U.S. Open and 2019 Australian Open and became the first player from Asia to reach No. 1 in the singles rankings. ___ An A-League soccer player has become the first Australian professional footballer to test positive for the new coronavirus. The unnamed player, who plays for the Newcastle Jets in New South Wales state, was tested Friday as a precaution before an international flight. He played in recent A-League matches against Brisbane and Melbourne City. The player is now in quarantine and the A-League is suspended at least until April 22. Jets chief executive Lawrie McKinna said the player is asymptomatic and in good health. McKinna said the rest of the squad does not “need to get into isolation” but are being monitored. ___ Soccer players and celebrities will take part in a global music festival on Saturday organized by the Spanish league in order to raise funds for the fight against the coronavirus. Barcelona’s Gerard Piqué, Real Madrid’s Sergio Ramos and Sevilla’s Jesús Navas will be among the players involved in the charity event organized to raise money “for the purchase of medical supplies in the battle against the COVID-19 pandemic and to also support fans confined to their homes during the current period of quarantine,” the league said. Celebrities in the festival will include singers Aitana, Alejandro Sanz, Beret and Luis Fonsi, actress Danna Paola, music bands Morat and Taburete, and tennis star Rafael Nadal. The soccer players and celebrities will all participate from their homes. The concert is to be shown live through the league's international broadcasters and streamed via YouTube and Facebook. The “music extravaganza” will be broadcast in more than 180 countries simultaneously, starting at 1700 GMT (1 p.m. EST). ___ Barcelona has delivered 30,000 masks to the Catalonia government to help fight the coronavirus pandemic, the club said Saturday. The masks were made in China and donated by insurance company Taiping, a regional partner of the club. Barcelona said the “daily use” masks will be distributed to nursing homes. The club added it is working through its foundation “to do as much as possible to help with this crisis, both locally and internationally.” Spain, where stay-at-home restrictions have been in place for nearly two weeks, reported 832 more deaths on Saturday, its highest daily count yet, bringing its total to 5,690. Another 8,000 confirmed infections pushed that count above 72,000 ___ More AP sports: https://apnews.com/apf-sports and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

Georgia Sports News

  • ATHENS Georgia quarterback D'Wan Mathis was back in his home state of Michigan over spring break when the coronavirus pandemic began to take effect. Some of the Bulldogs' players would end up staying home when UGA suspended and then canceled face-to-face spring semester classes. But not Mathis. 'D'Wan came back on spring break and told me he loves where he is from, but that he needed to go back to Georgia,' Terence Mathis told DawgNation on Friday. 'He said, Daddy, I love you, but I'm leaving.' 'For us, we're just happy he was granted the exemption to stay near campus where they have the best doctors in the world keeping up with him.' The former Ohio State quarterback commit from metro Detroit has had a challenging rehabilitation period after an emergency brain surgery procedure last May 23 put him in the ICU unit at Piedmont Athens Regional Medical Center. 'I want the public to know this, please write this: Georgia could have given up on my son,' Terence Mathis said. 'But instead, Kirby and his staff have treated D'Wan as though he was their own son. They've used every possible resource to stay behind him and keep him engaged with the team after saving his life.' RELATED: Georgia saved my son's life, medical director Ron Courson praised Indeed, Coach Kirby Smart made it clear last May that Georgia would not rush Mathis' comeback, and they planned for a complete recovery. 'We are expecting a full recovery, and the timeline is the least of our concerns,' Smart said at SEC spring meetings. Mathis' comeback has come in stages. He was cleared to run and lift last July. By the start of the 2019 season, he was participating in limited drill work. By last November, Mathis running the scout team offense and playing with such passion that coaches and doctors had to reel him in and remind him to use some restraint. Mathis was cleared to go through spring football drills, though it's important to note he's not yet been cleared for game action. There's an MRI test scheduled for May that could provided the all-important clearance for total contact (UGA doesn't tackle its quarterbacks in spring drills). More good news came on Friday, when the SEC added some provisions for coaches to instruct players. Mathis, along with fellow Georgia football quarterbacks Jamie Newman, Caron Beck and Stetson Bennett, has the benefit of chalk talks starting at 1 p.m. next Monday. RELATED: SEC moves toward resuming football preparations Terence Mathis maintains the football will take care of itself. He said the most important thing to the Mathis family is how D'Wan has been accepted into the Georgia football community. 'I'm indebted to Georgia, they have extended this incredible opportunity to D'Wan,' Terence Mathis said. 'Especially during these tough times, and you know it's bad up here in Michigan. 'It means everything to us as a family for him to now have the opportunity to be involved with the football planning while still pursuing academics. 'Coach (Todd) Monken has reached out to me and let me know that D'Wan is having positive progress.' Mathis' upside was obvious to all who watched last year's G-Day Game. The 6-foot-6, 205-pounder was 15-of-28 passing for 113 yards and provided one of the biggest highlights of the Georgia football spring game. Mathis, who ran a 10.8-second time in the 100 meters in high school, showed his speed when he caught a double-reverse pass from Matt Landers for a 39-yard touchdown. TRICK PLAY ALERT #GDay #GoDawgs pic.twitter.com/3Qc6Opb85L Georgia Football (@GeorgiaFootball) April 21, 2019 'D'Wan, he's explosive,' Jake Fromm said of his former understudy. 'I think he converted three or four first downs in a row with his legs. 'The guy can run the ball, he can throw it 70 yards, he's going to be a great player.' The strong performances in spring drills kept Mathis going during the dog days of last summer and into the season. But there were also frustrating times when D'Wan Maths didn't know what to do without football, unable to travel to away games. That's when Georgia came up biggest, according to his father. 'As frustrated as he got, the more they wrapped their arms around him,' Terence Mathis said. 'Those coaches could have said they were too busy trying to win the SEC East again and play for another league title. But they didn't say that. 'They believed in D'Wan, and they have stayed behind him, and the DawgNation fans have stayed behind him, too.' There is no timetable for college football to return at the time of this publication (March 28). The coronavirus has put all group activities around the world on hold. But Terence Mathis said his son will remain in Athens. 'That's what he considers his home now,' he said, 'and it's where we believe he belongs.' DawgNation D'Wan Mathis stories Mind Game: D'Wan Mathis ready to compete for starting job Mathis tipped by social media Ohio State misled him on Justin Fields D'Wan Mathis recovering after emergency brain cyst surgery Jake Fromm shares observations of D'Wan Mathis The post Georgia quarterback D'Wan Mathis continuing comeback home' in Athens, granted exemption appeared first on DawgNation.
  • We've now reached the Final Four. Not of the NCAA Tournament but of the top Georgia football moments that have occurred under Kirby Smart. We now have the representatives for each season 2016, 2017, 2018 and 2019 that Smart has guided the Georgia program. The 2016 winner was the top seed, being Nick Chubb's return against North Carolina. The game also gave Smart his first career win, while Chubb ran for over 200 yards in his first game back. The 2017 pick is the runaway favorite to win, as that year is being repped by Sony Michel's game-ending touchdown run against Oklahoma. It's hard to imagine this moment somehow not winning the whole bracket, given how dominant that moment is been in voting up to this point. The 2018 selection was D'Andre Swift's touchdown run against Auburn, which capped Swift's best-career game in a Georgia uniform. And the representative for the past season was Georgia's 23-17 win over Notre Dame. The big highlight from that game was the light show that took place between the third and fourth quarters, though Lawrence Cager's touchdown catch. The Swift run will take on the 2019 Notre Dame game, while Chubb's return has the unfortunate matchup against Michel's final Rose Bowl touchdown. You can vote on the results below, as well as see the full brackets as to how we got to this point. Full Bracket 2016 vs. 2017 region No. 1 Sony Michel's walk-off against Oklahoma vs.No. 1 Nick Chubb's return Breakdown:Michel dominated again, winning 92-8 over the 2017 Notre Dame take over. Michel's game-winning touchdown run is the heavy favorite to win the entire bracket. Think back to how great it felt in that moment for the Bulldogs to punch their ticket to Atlanta. Chubb's return also advanced to this point with relative ease, beating Jacob Eason's winner against Mizzou by a 72-28 margin. This was Chubb's first game back after a horrific knee injury against Tennessee in his sophomore season. He came out and ran for 222 yards, the second-most in his illustrious Georgia career. The result also gave Georgia a win over North Carolina in Smart's first-ever game as Georgia's head coach. In the first matchup, 2017's top moment against 2016's top moment DawgNation (@DawgNation) March 28, 2020 2018 vs. 2019 region No. 2 D'Andre Swift's touchdown run against Auburn vs.No. 1 The Notre Dame lights show The 77-yard touchdown run by Swift capped not only his best career game but also a three-game stretch that saw the Bulldogs beat three straight-ranked opponents in Florida, Kentucky and Auburn. It got the final four by beating Kirby Smart's post-Florida celebration. Auburn has one of the best run defenses in the country. @DAndreSwift has 186 yards against it, including this 77 yard touchdown. pic.twitter.com/XoxKAB0fyq Dayne Young (@dayneyoung) November 11, 2018 The Notre Dame win is on the shortlist of best home games of the past decade. It advanced with a 58-42 margin over HBTFD. And in the other matchup, 2018 against 2019 DawgNation (@DawgNation) March 28, 2020 More Georgia football stories from around DawgNation Georgia football podcast: CBS writer says UGA among teams most hurt by missing spring practice SEC steps toward resuming football preparations, approves online chalk talks Jonathan Jefferson: 5 things to know about this week's 2021 Georgia commit Opinion: Kirk Herbstreit's reckless speculation does college football a disservice WATCH: If you don't like Todd Gurley on the Atlanta Falcons, you're anti-fun ESPN NFL draft analyst Mel Kiper Jr. breaks down D'Andre Swift draft stock Georgia football podcast: 5 things to know about UGA's chances of making Playoff Tony Grimes: Nation's No. 1 CB was set to see UGA amid a flurry of spring visits The post Bracket season: Discussing the top moment of each Georgia football season under Kirby Smart appeared first on DawgNation.
  • DawgNation has four staffers who cover Georgia football from every angle: Beat, live streams, photos, podcasts, recruiting, etc. The 'Cover 4' concept is: 1) Present a topic; 2) Offer a reasoned response; 3) Share a brisk statement on that opinion. 4) Pepper the page with photos for the big picture. For this edition, we discuss what Georgia fans would have been talking about now had COVID-19 not put our way of life on hold. DawgNation continues with the 'Cover 4' concept. The focus is always a timely look with each of our guys manning the secondary on a pertinent topic. We're looking at our now useless Georgia spring practice schedule from earlier this year. It makes us wince. Poof. All of that is gone. But football will return. Someday. Hopefully soon. That schedule says the 2020 Bulldogs would have been six practices deep into their spring drills after today. What would have DawgNation been talking about right now? We closed our eyes and imagined what that would have looked like. It resulted in another 'Cover 4' discussion of four different aspects of the team. It was fun to do amidst a time of great renewal for the Georgia program. Well, except for a salty defense which should be the best of the Kirby Smart era in Athens. The quick in-and-out game remains. The Cover 4 is designed to come out as quick as everyone is to try to maintain their social distancing these days. What would have been the big Georgia football spring practice storyline right now? Brandon Adams: Jamie Newman The 'why' from 'DawgNation Daily' here: 'The quarterback is almost always the biggest story, and this certainly would've been the case with Newman. The absence of spring practice only increases our anticipation to see Newman's debut this fall .' Mike Griffith: The offensive line The 'why' from 'On the Beat' here: 'This is the area Kirby Smart is most concerned about, and he'll say it. There will be discussion about different players lining up in different places, and injury updates . ' Connor Riley: Todd, Todd, Todd Monken The 'why' from 'Good Day UGA' here: ' Between Smart and some offensive players, we'd have gotten to hear more about working with the new offensive coordinator and what he brings to the table, as well as the working dynamic with Smart.' Jeff Sentell: The need for more playmakers at receiver. Again. The Intel here: 'Kirby Smart made it clear last spring he didn't have enough playmakers at receiver. He wanted to see what Dominick Blaylock, Lawrence Cager and George Pickens could add to the unit. It would have been the same chorus this year. The only differences between the receivers practicing last spring would have been the subtraction of veterans J.J Holloman and Tyler Simmons and the addition of Pickens and Justin Robinson. The Bulldogs will again await the arrival of Jermaine Burton, Marcus Rosemy, Ladd McConkey and Arian Smith with great anticipation. When they hit the field, that's when we will get a glimpse of where Monken's new offense can take Georgia this fall.' The post Georgia football: What would have been the talk of spring practices by now? appeared first on DawgNation.
  • ATHENS Georgia and its new quarterback will be among the favorites when college football resumes, per the latest online odds from sportsbetting.ag. Wake Forest graduate transfer Jamie Newman is ranked fifth among the Heisman Trophy contenders without having even taken his first snap for the Bulldogs. To boot, Newman along with the rest of SEC players has just now gotten approval to receive online 'chalk talk' instruction from quarterbacks coach and offensive coordinator Todd Monken starting at 1 p.m. on Monday. Former Georgia quarterback Justin Fields is the favorite to win the Heisman Trophy at Ohio State (+450), followed by Clemson's Trevor Lawrence (+475), Oklahoma's Spencer Rattler (+1000), Texas' Sam Ehlinger (+1200) and then Newman (+1400). Other SEC quarterbacks among the favorites include Florida's Kyle Trask, who is tied for ninth with USC QB Kedon Slovis (+2500), Alabama QB Mac Jones and North Carolina QB Sam Howell. Tailback Zamir White is tied for 25th among the Heisman Trophy contenders listed (+6600). But White, like Newman, has yet to secure the starting spot at his position entering into what will be a unique yet still very competitive offseason. SEC teams are currently suspended from any on-campus activities and are social distancing amid the coronavirus pandemic. Once play resumes, Georgia figures to be in as good as shape as any program in the nation. RELATED: 4 reasons why Georgia football set for title run in 2020 The Bulldogs, as a team, rank fourth among the national championship contenders, per the online odds. Clemson is the favorite to win the national championship (+275), followed by Ohio State (+350), Alabama (+550) and then Georgia (+900). LSU is No. 5 on the preseason odds list (+1000), with Florida No. 6 (+1200), Oklahoma No. 7 (+2000) and Auburn, Notre Dame, Oregon, Penn State, Texas and Texas A&M tied at No. 8 (+2500). Georgia football offseason reads WATCH: Monty Rice shows proof of 'invisible progress' at Georgia The post Georgia football, Jamie Newman stand tall among preseason favorites in updated odds appeared first on DawgNation.
  • Georgia football is the No. 1 topic every day on DawgNation Daily the daily podcast for Georgia Bulldogs fans. Catch up on everything happening with UGA athletics with host Brandon Adams and the DawgNation experts as they break down the latest Georgia football recruiting news and discuss coach Kirby Smart's quest to return the Bulldogs to the top of the SEC. On episode No. 1,162 (March 27, 2020) of the podcast, Georgia fans can hear a discussion about why one CBS writer thinks UGA was hurt by missing spring practice. Georgia football podcast: CBS writer says UGA among teams most hurt by missing spring practice Beginning of the show: Georgia's new offensive coordinator Todd Monken and quarterback Jamie Newman lead to a scenario in which the Bulldogs are among the teams most harmed by missing spring practice according to a recent article by a CBS Sports writer. I'll discuss more on that topic on today's show. 10-minute mark: I share my response to ESPN analyst Kirk Herbstreit's prediction that the upcoming season will be canceled due to coronavirus concerns. 15-minute mark: DawgNation's Connor Riley joins the show. Some of the topics covered include The fun the Atlanta Falcons are having after signing former UGA and Los Angeles Rams running back Todd Gurley How UGA is impacted by not having spring practice And how college coaches should respond to the unprecedented challenges presented by dealing with the coronavirus 30-minute mark: I take a look at other SEC teams who didn't have the benefit of a spring practice including teams with new quarterbacks such as LSU and Alabama, and teams with new coaches such as Mississippi State and Missouri. 35-minute mark: I discuss Notre Dame coach Brian Kelly's proposed timeline for when coaches need access to their players in order to begin the season on time. End of show: I share the Gator Hater Updater. The post Georgia football podcast: CBS writer says UGA among teams most hurt by missing spring practice appeared first on DawgNation.